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I have a rooted Samsung Galaxy GT-I7500 running stock Donut (Android 1.6). I tried a couple of overclocking apps such as SetCPU and CPU Master, but none of them let me actually "over"-clock the CPU, because I can't set the maximum to be more than the default 528 MHz. I have read about speeds of 624 and/or 710 MHz possible with either the Galaxo custom ROM or GAOSP, but I want to achieve those kinds of speeds with stock Donut.

I've tried GAOSP b3 (Gingerbread) and Galaxo 1.6.3.4, but I prefer the feel of stock 1.6 (that's why I love my stock Nexus S running 2.3).

Is it possible to set the CPU speed beyond 528 MHz in my rooted Samsung Galaxy GT-I7500? How?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is my understanding that some ROMs allow for Overclocking, whereas others dont. It depends on how the kernel is setup. I couldnt Overclock my Samsung galaxy s2 for example on the stock rom with it rooted. I could however once I installed Cyanogen. Perhaps that is the case.

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Unfortunately, this is true. Galaxo is a modded version of the stock 1.6 with a kernel that allows for overclocking, whereas the original, stock 1.6 kernel doesn't. Thanks! –  aalaap Nov 28 '11 at 5:31

The look and feel of CM7 is superior compared to most stock rom's. So if your reason for not switching from the stock rom is the look n feel, you wont be disappointed with CM7.

Get CM7 for your phone from cm.get, install it. Once done go to

Setting --> CyanogenMOD settings --> Performance --> CPU Settings --> Change Min Frequency

That is it, but be careful you can screw up your system, there are available governors, i suggest you use them.

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The OP explicitly said they want to keep their current ROM, so telling them to use CM isn't helpful. –  Logos Nov 27 '11 at 13:31
    
My reason for not switching from the stock ROM is that anything else isn't stock. I love original Android and I hate customisations such as TouchWiz and Sense or even third-party launchers. Besides, Cyanogenmod isn't available for the i7500 directly. That's what GAOSP is for - it's a port of CM for the i7500. I've already tried GAOSP (based on CM7/Gingerbread), and I wasn't happy with the feel. –  aalaap Nov 28 '11 at 5:27
    
@Logos I only suggested CM7 in case look and feel was the reason.. aalaap my bad did not have knowledge of that. –  Aadi Droid Nov 28 '11 at 12:05

If you're using Donut you're using an older kernel, or perhaps the presets for your phone from autodetect don't include the desrired frequencies. From SetCPU's manual:

In rare situations and in older kernels, and when SetCPU cannot get root access, SetCPU may not be able to autodetect the full range of speeds supported by the kernel. If this is the case, you can configure SetCPU to use custom frequencies. To get started, you'll need the list of frequencies your kernel can support in kHz (not MHz!).

Create a plain text file called “setcpu.txt” and place it on the root directory of your SD card or on your SD card's ext partition (/sdcard/ or /system/sd/). The text files should sort the frequencies on one line by comma, from lowest to highest. For example, the following is a valid config file:

125000,250000,500000,550000,600000

To store the custom frequency list on your phone, save it as “setcpu” with no extension and put it in /data/. SetCPU reads from the SD card first and uses that text file if present, then tries to read from /data/.

To configure SetCPU to read your custom frequencies, go back to the device selection screen (in the Main tab, press Menu > Device Selection), choose “show other frequencies” if necessary, and choose the custom config option at the very bottom.

If you don't want to do that, you can also manually choose a different model of phone that offers the frequencies you're looking to use instead of using auto detect.

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Is that just a very elaborate way of saying RTFM? :-) Thanks for the tip - I'll certainly try this tonight! –  aalaap Nov 28 '11 at 5:31

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