Take the 2-minute tour ×
Android Enthusiasts Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for enthusiasts and power users of the Android operating system. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a T-Mobile Samsung Dart (which IIUC is a re-branded Samsung Galaxy Mini) and a Wi-Fi network in my apartment with two access points. When I make Wi-Fi calls while walking from one end of my apartment to the other, the signal from the access point I was originally connected to (AP1) degrades to the point of being unusable. By the time I get to this point the signal from the other access point (AP2) is strong but my phone doesn't roam to AP2.

Both access points are set up with the same SSID and security settings, so roaming should "just work". It does work when the Wi-Fi connection is idle, although it usually takes a long time for the phone to figure out that the signal from AP1 is weak and start using AP2. Using Wi-Fi calling seems to make Wi-Fi roaming even less aggressive, probably because the Wi-Fi NIC is busy sending data instead of scanning for hotspots to roam to.

How do I configure my phone to roam more aggressively between Wi-Fi hotspots on the same network (same SSID and security settings)?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

Even if the other AP connected, you will lose your call. When you switch access points, you are going to drop the wi-fi call.

The device may have a hard time figuring out if it should switch to AP2 because it is still connected to AP1 and it can still see AP1. if the signals overlap, it will connect to the strongest one at the time, if it is already connected, it will not attempt to connect to another AP until it is no longer connected. Once you go completely out of range of AP1, the device scans and sees AP2, then it connects. It doesn't matter how "strong" the signal is for another AP, if you are connected, it will not see another AP. Then once you disconnect, the device needs to go in to "scan" mode.

If your router supports it, you could turn down the power of the AP so they don't overlap (or if they do, it is only slightly). but then again, if your router supports that, you could also increase the power so you don't need the second AP.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.