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I downloaded One Click Lag Fix and it requested z4Root, I also downloaded from the computer, because it was not on the market and installed, but AVG reported me that is infected.

I downloaded with multiple sites including xda-developers, and all were infected.

Should I proceed with installation?

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Does AVG provide any informations? –  Leandros Jan 27 '12 at 18:59
    
OCLF has nothing to do with z4root. Can you be more clear about what exactly you're doing and what exactly is being flagged? –  Matthew Read Jan 27 '12 at 20:05
    
My phone isn't rooted and I can't do lag fix without rooting phone! OCLF asks me to install z4root from market but did't find it there. I downloaded it from xda-developers.com and installed but OCLF insists to download from the market and does't recognized z4root that I downloaded from computer and installed. I installed again z4root and AVG is marked as a threat but it doesn't showed no further information. I have a Samsung Galaxy Y android version 2.3.6 Gingerbread. –  Dule Jan 28 '12 at 11:18
    
Can I do lag fix? This is the picture which shows what happens when I turn on the application mobile-dev.co.za/screens/oclfscreen1.png –  Dule Jan 28 '12 at 11:18
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2 Answers 2

Antivirus applications use special algorithms to scan, take apart and analyze files on your computer and network. If they are certain chunks in the files that it finds suspicious, then it gets flagged as malware.

Now, certain applications like one click root applications use hacks similar to the ones that some malware do. This causes the antiviruses to wrongly flag such software.

Most likely, z4root isnt infected but you can always use a secondary anti virus app to check or go on the xda forum thread and look for comments on infected files.

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z4root is in fact infected.

It is infected with an often used root exploit for Android 2.2 Froyo which allows you (or any malicious app) to gain root rights by executing it on a vulnerable phone. z4root is neutral if you have the original benign one however: It's only used to gain root. It does nothing else on its own.

AVG (and other antivirus vendors) flag this because it is a root exploit. They don't care if you like it or not and if you want to use it in a benign way (to install lag fix). It bypasses Android's security by exploiting a known vulnerability and this is enough to label it as infected.

To give an example:
Let's assume some app piggypacks this exploit to gain root to be able to start wreaking havoc on your phone (or with your data by formatting/wiping it. whatever).

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