Take the 2-minute tour ×
Android Enthusiasts Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for enthusiasts and power users of the Android operating system. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question seems to say that it's necessary to root an at&t phone (like the samsung captivate) in order to install apps from unofficial sources.

My question is a bit more focused: if I'm working on my own android app, will I be able to load it on my at&t phone for testing (via the android SDK, etc.) without first rooting the phone?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The Android Compatibility Definition Document for 2.2 says that “Device implementations MUST support the Android Developer Tools provided in the Android SDK.”

Any device which isn't “compatible with Android” according to this document isn't going to have the Google services, including the Android Market.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This question seems to say that it's necessary to root an at&t phone (like the samsung captivate) in order to install apps from unofficial sources.

That is not true. While you cannot download apps from the Web, you can install apps through the development tools, or things based on the development tools (like the Sideloader Wonder Machine).

My question is a bit more focused: if I'm working on my own android app, will I be able to load it on my at&t phone for testing (via the android SDK, etc.) without first rooting the phone?

Yes.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious as to why you say you can't download apps from the web? If you can download an APK file then you can install it. Just because the majority of apps are only available in market, doesn't mean that you can't download apps from other sources. –  Captain Toad Oct 8 '10 at 23:16
2  
@Captain Toad: AT&T phones block installs from the Web (via the phone's browser) and third-party markets. I suspect this may also block "file managers" from installing APKs located on SD cards, though I haven't heard about that one way or another. However, they cannot block the development tools and remain compatible with the Compatibility Definition Document (a requirement for having the Android Market). –  CommonsWare Oct 8 '10 at 23:38
    
Thanks for the clarification. I didn't know that it was possible to block installs that way and none of the carriers in the UK (where I'm based) would be dumb enough to try. All the Android handsets and slates I have seen or used have an "Unknown Sources" that allows installation of non-market apps –  Captain Toad Oct 21 '10 at 13:53
    
@Captain Toad: Yup, we Android folk here in the States are not happy with AT&T. :-( –  CommonsWare Oct 21 '10 at 14:09
add comment

I cannot post comments due to rep limitations. I am adding a link for what commonsware said.

I will upvote you when I hit 15 rep commonsWare.

Sideload Wonder

share|improve this answer
add comment

Update:

AT&T has finally seen the light and allowed unknown sources on most of its devices; you should get an update.

If you want a real "developer phone" you can get the Nexus S (right now it's exclusive to Best Buy, so you'll have to go there. Make sure you get the AT&T variant if you want HSPA+). I have only booted stock once on mine - and it was not the first boot.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.