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When I charge my HTC Sensation mobile with the charger supplied by HTC the battery duration is more or less 1 day (depending of the usage). But (here comes my question) when I charge the mobile through usb connected to the PC, or with the cable supplied by Amazon Kindle, the battery duration is much lower, sometimes a couple of hours.

Could someone explain which is the electrical reason of this behaviour?

Thanks in advance

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Your phone will charge much slower using a USB cable attached to the PC than with a wall-charger, but as long as you wait until it is 100% full then it should reach the same capacity and duration at the end. See Why is charging from computer using USB slower than using an outlet? –  GAThrawn Apr 5 '12 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

No. Since you mentioned the battery DURATION is hours shorter, it must be the usage not the charger.

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Whether this is likely to be true or not, this is not an answer to the question. The question is why is the duration shorter, not if it is. You may not believe the questioner's circumstances, but if so, it would be more appropriate to ask them to provide usage data to verify their claim instead of outright dismissing it. It might turn out that usage is the difference, but you may also be surprised. –  Dave M G Jun 8 '12 at 2:18

It's not quite an exact answer, but I try:

I noticed the same behaviour on other devices too: My Nook Color's supplied cable & wall charger feeds it with 2A. When using a normal cable this is limited to 0.5A (or so). When charging with 0.5A the Nook shows 100% far quicker than it can be possible but starts charging (silently) in the background again. My guess is this:

The device sometimes sucks more power during usage than your charger unit can supply and the internal charging circuit then decides to stop charging and shows 100% capacity reached from that time on. This might be to prevent charge/uncharge waves when your car charger does not supply your device's max power usage.

Some car chargers only provide 450mA... or don't have a stable enough voltage ouput.

This is the standard for generic USB chargers: EN-62684

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