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asus sl101 slider running cyanogenmod 10

This problem actually started around when I upgraded to cm9.1 and I think I got an error that my android profile had changed or something. from that day forward I have been unable to delete anything in my downloads folder.

The following did not work

  • rm /sdcard/download/filename
  • removing with rootbrowser
  • adb shell> rm /sdcard/download/filename
  • remounting the sdcard

I get the error that the folder is read only and when I try to change permissions it wont let me.

I was able to

mv /sdcard/download /sdcard/download.back
mkdir /sdcard/download

but still cannot delete from the old download folder.

Eek!

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can you paste here the output of ls -ld /sdcard/download; mount | grep sdcard ? –  sputnick Sep 30 '12 at 0:32
    
u0_a37@android:/ # ls -ld /sdcard/download; mount | grep sdcard drwxrwxr-x root sdcard_rw 2012-09-30 00:27 download /dev/fuse /storage/sdcard0 fuse rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1023,group_id=1023,default_permissions,allow_ot‌​her 0 0 –  Joshua Robison Sep 30 '12 at 1:59
    
is it possible that a program like titanium backup is somehow rotecting them even above root? –  Joshua Robison Sep 30 '12 at 2:00
    
Did you try the full real path ? rm -rf /mnt/sdcard/download –  sputnick Sep 30 '12 at 2:22
    
I just tried it now and got the error, "read-only file system" the trouble is, it's not true. other things on sdcard delete fine. –  Joshua Robison Sep 30 '12 at 2:31

2 Answers 2

You have a special mount point* for /mnt/sdcard/download, so

  • umount it with umount /mnt/sdcard/download
  • remove the directory rm -rf /mnt/sdcard/download

And try to figure out what cause your Android to use this special mount.

If you just want read-write access, run this command : mount -o remount,rw /mnt/sdcard/download and then you will be able to rm anything inside.

*figured out by the discussions in your question thread

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u0_a37@android:/ $ umount /mnt/sdcard/download failed: Invalid argument –  Joshua Robison Sep 30 '12 at 3:00
    
1|u0_a37@android:/ # mount -o remount,rw /mnt/sdcard/download Usage: mount [-r] [-w] [-o options] [-t type] device directory 1|u0_a37@android:/ # –  Joshua Robison Sep 30 '12 at 3:00
    
i wonder if some parental software i installed a long while back or titanium backup or some software is causing this. but i deleted all the data and cache before flashing this rom. several times... –  Joshua Robison Sep 30 '12 at 3:02
    
You should be root to do it –  sputnick Sep 30 '12 at 3:05
    
sorry, copy pasted the wrong line. ----------------------- u0_a37@android:/ # umount /mnt/sdcard/download failed: Invalid argument –  Joshua Robison Sep 30 '12 at 3:10

I'm not sure if you're still having this issue or not, but a couple of things that come to mind:

  • In the output you paste in your responses, you mix terminal output with $ and #. You need to be root all the time which means that you should always see a #.
  • If I were you, I would first check the permissions on the old download directory with something like ls -alh | grep <foldername>. Who owns the directory, what group?
  • Try changing ownership with chown, changing chmod to 777 recursively (just throwing stuff at the wall here to see what sticks). After setting yourself (root) as the owner and giving everyone full rights to the directory recursively, I would try rm -rfv <foldername> and see what output I got.

Hopefully this might help someone else. Also, when you do ls -alh it should show you if it's a symlink, and if so to where. If it's a mounted folder, I would run something like mount | grep <foldername> to see what's going on.

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Thanks for trying to help. The -h flag does not work in the android terminal. All the files already belong to root user and group seems to be 'sdcard_rw' . chmod 777 * returns no errors but does not change anything at all. Permissions remain rwxrwxr-x –  Joshua Robison Sep 14 '13 at 2:41

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