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I'm trying to use an Android emulator to use services running on my local machine. I have a site running under IIS which in my host file looks like this:

127.0.0.1       www.local.company.co.uk

I have several sites running under Apache Tomcat. My host file for Tomcat related sites:

127.0.0.1       internal.localhost.company.com  # port:8090
127.0.0.2       external.localhost.company.com  # port:8081
127.0.0.3       auth.ws.localhost.company.com  # port:8082
127.0.0.8       mysite.localhost.company.com  # port:8086

What I have tried so far (in the following steps):

adb pull /etc/hosts

Edit Android host file:

127.0.0.1        localhost
10.0.2.2         myefc.localhost.efinancialcareers.com

adb remount
adb push hosts /etc/hosts

Then I try to visit myefc.localhost.efinancialcareers.com in the browser and am told webpage not found. I’d at least expect it to go to www.local.company.co.uk.

What I would ideally like is to be able to go to any site on my local machine which are specified in the above host file examples.

I am on Windows 7 and using Tomcat 6. The emulator I am using is nexus one.

share|improve this question
    
Guess you need to learn some networking stuff first: 127.0.0.1 is the so-called "loopback", and always refers to the machine itself. Do address a service from a machine different than the one it is running on, you need to use the device's "external" IP (intranet or internet), not the 127.* ones. Having said this, it is not an Android related question, and thus might be off-topic here; probably serverfault.com or superuser.com are better places to ask. –  Izzy Jan 10 '13 at 13:30
    
When I go to 10.0.2.2 in the Android browser, I am eventually presented with the site running on IIS, on my local machine that would be 127.0.0.1:8080. It's extremely slow though. –  Ilyas Patel Jan 10 '13 at 14:09
    
10.0.x.x is a valid IP for that, right (Intranet). It goes via your network, so from your Android device via WiFi via router via cable to the target -- which of course is not that fast as if you run the browser directly on the service machine. And again, this is no Android specific question (see above). –  Izzy Jan 10 '13 at 14:46
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closed as off topic by Izzy, Liam W, t0mm13b, roxan, Matthew Read Jan 10 '13 at 16:40

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