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18

Whether or not you can use a phone on a specific carrier depends on a variety of factors, but it is generally possible to figure it out provided that you can find enough information on the device and carrier you are interested in. The main points to focus on will be the cellular standard the carrier uses, the frequency bands it uses, and the associated ...


9

I will say yes, but, that answer doesn't necessarily hold true 100% of the time. It really depends on the bands that the device supports. On the device spec sheets you will usually see something like this: 800/1900/700 These are the bands that the device will operate on. I pulled these numbers from the Droid Bionic. From that spec sheet, it goes even ...


5

Yes, it has HSPA+ which is what T-Mobile's "4G" actually stands for. This article on AndroidAuthority should help you understanding why it doesn't have LTE.


5

Since the nature of your question is simply "is this possible", the answer is yes, there are ways to spoof your ESN. Often this is a form of phone cloning, which is also simply referred to as ESN cloning. The concept is that you take one phone and then configure it to broadcast using the ESN of a different phone, effectively "cloning" the second as far as ...


5

Simple answer: No. 3G (also called UMTS) is a different techology than 4G (also called LTE). Both technologies don't share any common base technology (starting with the frequencies and going over to the encoding technologies). So your carrier has two different nets, one with 3G and another with 4G. If you are lucky being near a 4G base station you have an ...


4

Is that true? Yes, this is true. The USA is currently using the 700, 800 (Sprint only, I think), 1700 and 1900 MHz bands for LTE service, whereas European providers are using 800, 900, 1800, and 2600 MHz (Wikipedia). If it's true, can the US variant be persuaded to work in the UK, 4G-wise? I'm not shy of flashing custom ROMs and so forth. No. The ...


3

An "LTE band", or any other type of "band" that you read about with relation to a phone, is referring to the radio frequencies that the phone picks up. Each cellular provider builds their network on a specific set of radio frequencies which are divided up into chunks that are assigned band numbers. So, using your T-Mobile example, band 4 is specifically ...


3

LTE bands are the bands of radio spectrum that the cellular networks run on. There are 44 defined bands and different carriers in different areas use different bands to provide service. Wikipedia has a fairly extensive list of who uses what bands. Yes, T-Mobile operates on band 4 (aka AWS), so any other band capability on the device would go unused. If ...


3

Often times, one of the main differences between Android phone models is the supported frequency bands. This can be because they simply use different antennas for different bands, or because they support completely different network standards (e.g. CDMA and GSM versions). It is not uncommon for devices to be released with completely different names on ...


3

The HTC Evo does not contain any LTE hardware, so it wont work


3

First, WiMax and 4G are completely separate. WiMax already has real-world implementation, whereas 4G does not; 4G is still in development. Second, 3G LTE is also completely separate from 4G. LTE also has real-world implementation. A 3G LTE phone can only operate at 4G speeds if it has hardware capable of it. The manufacturer will undoubtedly advertise ...


2

I have a Nexus S for T-Mobile, and I've enjoyed it so far. There's only been one update for the Nexus S so far, to 2.3.3. I didn't get it the first day, so I installed it myself. Unless Sprint turns it off, you should be able to tether. I can both over Wifi and USB. I have never needed to root, and I'm a rather advanced Android user. You can unlock the ...


2

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.dazbradbury.restartConnections While not an actual solution - this app does remedy (99% of the time, in my experience) the connectivity issues.


2

In the HTC Dream (G1) the UMTS radio (3G) is a separate board from the rest of the phone. While this is a Desire Z and I haven't had the opportunity to take one apart, it's probably very similar. The 3G/4G daughterboard (or if it's connected, antenna) could have failed, cracked, disconnected or sustained damage in some other way. Software won't fix it. You ...


2

It's hard to say without knowing what specific model(s) you're thinking of, but by and large the antennas you're thinking of are probably designed for 3G/EVDO, in which case the answer is no. Sprint's WiMAX network operates on a completely different frequency than it's 3G network, so the antenna for one will not work for the other. The EVO itself has two ...


2

Yes, the current Verizon 4G phones all have support for the 3G network. As Matthew Read points out, it would not make sense until 4G coverage is available everywhere that 3G is. If you have an active data connection, your phone will get a new IP address when it lands on the new network (4G->3G or 3G->4G); apps must be able to handle this event (any app ...


2

That's not a bad idea at all. I have Verizon Wireless and I do this all the time. That's what tethering is for, and the USB option as well. 4G is fast, and for what it's worth, based on what you've said, it seems like a fantastic idea. To answer your second question and forward, no - - your phone wouldn't fry, providing you got a phone with good specs. ...


2

You can use the code *#*#4636*#*# in caller app, you will find a menu called 'Testing', enter in phone information and then in 'set preferred network type' select 'WCDMA only' or 'GSM only'


2

When connected to LTE, the phone is also separately connected to the GSM network for voice. Voice does not go over LTE so switching your data to WCDMA (HSPA) won't make any difference in the quality of voice calls, unless you are using VOIP calling. There isn't much you can do to boost the signal other than not using a case or if you do, stick to a thin ...


2

Easy answer Depends on. More detailed answer: This is no easy yes/no question, but has many things to consider. Several factors have to be taken into account. Picking just the easy ones to make it less complicated: what is the energy consumption in idle mode how much energy is needed per time unit how much data is transfered per time unit how much data ...


1

The issue is most likely caused by a wrong APN configuration. Though customer care told you their card is "self configurable", this may well be relative: many ROMs (especially custom ROMs like cyanogenmod) come with a built-in list of APNs, which are matched against the provider as specified by the SIM card, and used correspondingly. While those matches ...


1

While unlikely, it's possible that the Nexus 7 doesn't support your local LTE network. It seems like Aero2 only operates LTE on 900MHz and 2500MHz (Take that with a grain of salt though; it may be incorrect or incomplete). The Nexus 7 2013 apparently doesn't support either of those frequencies. Oddly enough, apparently neither does the iPad Mini. You may ...


1

What version of Android you currently have on your Nexus device? I have (I think) exactly the same device, as you (ASUS Nexus 7 II (2013) LTE) and three days ago it was upgradred from 4.3.0 to 4.4.2 KitKat (I issued manual upgrade, by connecting to WiFi network and going to Settings > About phone > System Updates). After upgrade, option you're ...


1

According to GSMArena, the Nexus 7 2013 uses a microSIM. Google's help page on inserting the SIM further confirms this. I would fully expect that Google would include a SIM of the appropriate size, unless they've completely reneged on their "Don't be evil" bit. If not, just break out your scissors to cut it down to the appropriate size and shape. The ...


1

I don't think it makes a difference which Android version you use: the support for 4G is provided by the cell radio drivers, added to the system by the manufacturer. The Samsung Galaxy S Advance does not have the hardware needed to use 4G networks, so upgrading the OS won't add this support, and there's no way a third-party app can do that either. If you ...


1

While this is sort of a "shopping" question, it is also a question about if these phones will work on t-mobile's network. T-Mobile does not (currently) have LTE. So if the device has LTE, you will not use the LTE chip. Will the devices work on T-Mobile? Yes. Will you get the T-Mobile 4G speeds? Well that depends on what bands (or frequencies) the device ...


1

If you get a device working on a specific carrier or not depends on the following factors: cellular standards and frequency bands artificial locks on the device and sometimes willingness of the carrier First, check what your future carrier and phone have. For carrier networks and frequencies Wikipedia is the most complete source I know: ...


1

You don't need the US phone to begin with. If you're just looking for the RAM: According to a Cnet article the UK Version has 2GB of RAM. Apparently the international version excluding US also has 2GB RAM.


1

I would not read too much into EE's rollout of 4G just yet, for starters, the frequencies are different, give that time, EE and other 4G operators in the UK would have the final say on the compatibility of the handset. Here in Ireland, 3 and Vodafone are planning a merger which would see the in-evitable 4G being rolled out - do not know when yet... Stick ...


1

It seems the issue is network authentication problems caused by Verizon's switch to a UICC SIM-based authentication for both 3G and 4G connections on all of its 4G LTE devices. See this article: http://www.androidpolice.com/2011/12/19/this-is-why-your-verizon-galaxy-nexus-or-other-4g-lte-vzw-phone-is-losing-data-signal/



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