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Backups made with the -system argument can't be restored to a different Android version. It's not that the OS itself is in the backup: it's that the settings from system apps are in the backup and can only be read by the same version that produced them. Usually upgrading to a newer minor version (e.g. from an earlier milestone release to the stable release) ...


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Same problem here - this is how I fixed it on my side. Preparations: - Samsung Galaxy S5 on Android 6.0.1 (not rooted) - adb v. 1.0.32 running under windows 10 command line - password set on the S5 I succeded when using quotes for all switches: adb backup "-apk -noshared -all -nosystem" -> will prompt for the password and produce a backup.ab ...


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on master device: Configure wifi proxy manually adb pull /data/misc/wifi/ipconfig.txt on second device: adb shell svc wifi disable adb push ipconfig.txt /data/misc/wifi/ipconfig.txt adb shell svc wifi enable


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you can redirect kernel logs during boot time using USB serial port. If the phone doesn't even boot up to a stable state where the ADB commands can be used, one might be interested in redirecting the kernel messages to some places where they can be seen. This is to leverage the "console=" command for the kernel. For different devices, there may be ...


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The best answer is It depends on the situation. Let me explain: Some solution make work better than others for some files than others. For instance, use Bluetooth to send a picture, or Wi-Fi based FTP for small files. For larger files, you may want to use a cable and transfer them manually, or even load these files onto a high-speed SD card and plug that ...


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USB Debugging is not relevant, it doesn't come into play here, but you must be able to connect it to your computer via USB. The first thing you have to do is unlock the bootloader, luckily the Nexus 4 does not require anything special to unlock the bootloader. From the fasboot screen, on your computer use the command: sudo fastboot oem unlock And follow ...


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Turns out there was much more to unmount beyond /mnt/sdcard. Through ADB (and rooted) I unmounted /mnt/sdcard/.android_secure, then /mnt/sdcard, then everything under /mnt. Then I was able to partition my SD card. I hope someone can make good use of this thread one day!



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