Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Try with shell using a keyboard pm install [path_to_apk]


3

Check if you can connect a mouse (or Keyboard) through USB OTG port (and microUSB-to-USB converter cable)... I'm not sure whether your device supports OTG or not... Just give a try...


1

Yes, if the phone is connected to the internet, you can install apps from the Google Play web interface](https://play.google.com/store/apps) without touching the phone. Starting the app is a different matter, though: you may need to find an app that's specifically designed for this situation, so it can be triggered without needing to open it from the ...


0

On custom recoveries (CWM, TWRP) you normally are able to use adb. With that you can delete the corrupted bootanimation and replace it with your original one. Mount your /system partition using "Mount->System" on TWRP or "Mounts and Storage->mount /system" on CWM Plug your phone onto the computer Remove your corrupt bootanimation: adb shell "rm ...


0

I'll be answering my question.. I downloaded this USBDView and I deleted all COM ports that are open. I also did removing my usb controllers on my Device Manager. I restarted my computer to reload all the drivers; then opening the flasher generates a new COM port, clicking the upgrade and it worked.


0

Try installing the Microsoft User-Mode Driver Framework (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2685813). It will require a restart. Worked for me, Nexus 5, Windows 7 SP1. I tried the Google USB Driver (http://developer.android.com/sdk/win-usb.html) but it didn't fix the issue for me. The Microsoft User-Mode Driver Framework, however, did.


0

I'm sure this is not exactly the answer you're looking for, but this could solve your problem: If your Nexus works fine otherwise, why don't you just plug a mouse and keyboard (via USB OTG or Bluetooth) and pretend your Nexus does not have touch screen? Anything, including allowing USB debugging would work as the mouse cursor is even usable when your phone ...


1

You need to enable USB debugging on your phone. You should get prompted to accept an RSA key, which will mean that your computer is authorised. Also keep in mind that any coding questions belong on StackOverflow.


0

Have you checked that your ADB drivers are working. Just run following command from where you have installed ADB adb devices If not detected try manually updating your phone ADB drivers. Install generic drivers here. link If not try the following Post 1 #Troubleshooting part Once you are sure that ADB is working... Follow steps given in this Post 1 ...


1

This will work on a linux: adb shell dd if=/dev/block/mmcblk0p7|sed 's/\r$//' > backup.bin In MacOS it can be made to work as well, you just need to do it with Perl: adb shell dd if=/dev/block/mmcblk0p7|perl -pe 's/\x0D\x0A/\x0A/g' > backup.bin


0

You need to unlock your bootloader. You'll need to go to the HTC dev website and select your device in the menu on the right, and then follow the instructions it gives you. (Note that this might void your warranty)


0

Carl Parker writes about it on Android Authority: (partly reproduced here in case the original post goes down) For Apps Installed on the Device Assuming you have installed the app on your device, go to the app’s Google Play Store link and take note of the words after “?id=” and ignore the rest. Connect your device to the computer via ...


0

and the answer is pretty simple, use cp instead of mv)


0

I had my digitizer burned (by flashing corrupted recovery) and flashed new ROM and I was able to proceed as described here: http://android.stackexchange.com/a/69600/60711


0

To update the PATH variable inside a running adb shell you can use the expect command. This works on a non-rooted phone where you can't edit system files as suggested in the other answers. Put the following script somewhere on the path of your development machine, for example in ~/bin/adb-shell-busybox: #!/usr/bin/expect -- spawn adb shell expect "$" { ...


1

This answer on stack overflow suggests that it could be a permissions issue, the user that is attempting to start the adb server cannot access the file. Could you try moving the sdk to a folder that is not within your users area and see if you can start it then?


1

I didn't test that, but you didn't quote the command – so su -c just got the command pm to execute, while everything behind that got passed as additional parameters to adb shell. And shell doesn't know anything about "disable". adb shell su -c "pm disable com.google.android.gsf/.update.SystemUpdateService$Receiver" should fix that – and pass the complete ...


0

I think you should be able to use adb on your phone while in recovery. adb devices should show something along the lines of YOUR_DEVICE recovery. Once you have access to your device in recovery, you can mount the data partition using adb shell busybox mount /data and then you can use adb pull to pull data from the data partition, for example: adb pull ...


0

I don't know if this is the reason for you, but I've seen the symptoms you describe caused by USB problems. There are two particular possible problems: The cable is loose, probably at the device end. Then wiggling it slightly can cause a brief disconnection. You wouldn't normally notice this, because it only lasts for a second, but it'll terminate an adb ...


-1

find your device on XDA forums Root your device and find an appropiate Rom Download and install it Profit


2

You can download and flash a factory image from here: https://developers.google.com/android/nexus/images#razorktu84p it also includes instructions at the top on how to do it. This will restore it completely to stock.


0

Files and directories below /data/data are protected from the "average user", so you cannot simply "pull" them unless the ADB daemon is running in root mode. Other than the file you were referring to (/system/buildprop is at least readable by all apps), folders below /data/data are "invisible" (except for root), so they cannot even be read. To be able to ...


0

You cannot pull data folder directly since adb doesn't have file listing access to it. If you want to pull the /data folder you can do it via recovery ([Custom recovery, CWM/TWRP] run adb while device is in recovery mode, hopefully a custom recovery). Or as root, copy /data to another directory (sdcard) and pull it from there.


0

It turns out most of the problems seem to have stemmed from my trying to split the boot and recovery images in the wrong place. I was trying to extract the kernel and ramdisk at the 1F8B for gzip (the kernel before, ramdisk after), but there were several instances of 1F8B (specifically 1F8B 0800) in the hex code and the first one was not the correct one. ...


-1

Yes it is possible using ADB to disable USB debugging. Using the appropriate shell input keyevent commands you can navigate the GUI and change the setting.


1

From the sources, it looks like it's printing out the contents of the SignalStrength object: private SignalStrength mSignalStrength = new SignalStrength(); ... pw.println("last known state:"); ... pw.println(" mSignalStrength=" + mSignalStrength); ... This object is described in detail on the Android Developers ...


1

You can find the code that produces this output in SignalStrength.java in the Android framework. Even if you don't know Java, it's pretty easy to see which raw value is which. If there are any values you don't understand (the names are pretty concise and only make sense if you're familiar with phone standards), you can read the inline documentation ...



Top 50 recent answers are included