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11

BurritoRoot seems to be the way to go for root on the Kindle Fire. I rooted mine with this tool and then installed TWRP to get ICS on the Fire. BurritoRoot is a simple .apk that needs to be installed. Rooting itself is then easy as with SuperOneClick. Here are the resources for BurritoRoot: Offical XDA Thread for BurritoRoot AndroidPolice Blog post with ...


11

You can take screen shots with ddms and the Android SDK. It's not hard to set up. See http://www.thefireblog.com/2011/11/16/houston-we-have-screenshots/: So, here’s a quick summary people: Install the android SDK tools, then the platform-tools Edit your adb_usb.ini file to add the 0×1949 vendor ID at the end Ensure that adb is running ...


11

You can set up the Market on a Fire, but only if you have root by doing the following (guide originally from this XDA thread): Prerequisites Root your Kindle Fire Download the following apks GoogleServicesFramework.apk Vending.apk (Latest Version 3.3.11) See HERE for .apk downloads (complete GApps zip file) Root Explorer App (or ...


10

The Amazon Kindle Store and the Google Android Market are different stores. Apps you buy in one store are not honored in the other store. You can install the Amazon Store on your Nexus One pretty easily, so you'll be able to use Apps you buy on your Fire on your Nexus One. But going the other way is more trouble (it currently requires you've rooted your ...


7

The most stable option at this point is to use CyanogenMod. You can get it onto your Fire by doing the following: Root and Custom Recovery On Windows, you can use the Kindle Fire Utility to root the Kindle Fire and install Team Win's recovery (TWRP). It's extremely straightforward, and should even set up the Google drivers for you. The whole process is ...


7

Unless Amazon releases their Kindle Fire source code, there won't be a way to mod a different Android tablet to be a faux Fire. I seriously doubt that will happen That's not to say that someone won't be able to put together some combination of mods and apps that might approximate some of the Fire's functionality, but that's a pretty daunting task, if ...


7

Try this: adb shell "cd /data/local && mkdir tmp" adb shell mv /data/local/tmp /data/local/tmp.bak adb shell ln -s /data /data/local/tmp adb reboot adb wait-for-device adb shell rm /data/local.prop adb shell "echo \"ro.kernel.qemu=1\" > /data/local.prop" adb reboot By creating a link to from /data to /data/local/tmp, ...


6

I had the same problem with Kindle Fire Utility, and I actually figured this out. The install_drivers.bat replaces the driver, which is not what you want! You need both drivers in place, the regular Amazon Kindle one, and the ADB driver. To get it to work: Uninstall the Android ADB driver in Device Manager (right click to do this) In Device Manager, right ...


6

The Kindle Fire will function as it normally would, but you cannot use the Video on Demand service while you are rooted. The Amazon Appstore functions fine even if you're rooted. You can revert to the "original functionality" with the "Unroot" button provided by SuperOneClick. Nobody knows this but Amazon. Honeycomb was not open-sourced when the Fire was ...


6

The title of your question and it's body are really not very related to one another, but I think the title is actually something that's worth covering since I haven't really seen it come up here before (in a general sense). Per the title of your question: You can't register a device on the Market from the web interface alone. Devices appear once the Market ...


5

I have a kindle Fire I received as a gift and live in Canada. The Amazon App Store is visible but you cannot download anything. It says "this service is unavailable in your region" The web browser works fine, as does downloading books from Amazon .ca You can see the content for sale or borrowing in Amazon Prime, but get the same message.


5

Yes, an eBook from Android Market (in Google Books) has a different format from the Kindle. It would seem that you can obtain Google books in either ePub or PDF (more information here). Amazon books are in the AZW format. This comes down to personal preference. I have read books on both Google Books and Kindle on my Xoom; I see little to no difference in ...


5

You can use Kindle Fire Utility to easily get root and Market with Google Apps. It would automatically perform steps described in the above answers and even more.


5

eldarerathis's answer got me going on the right track... Since I already had the Android SDK installed on my Windows PC, I configured it to recognize the Fire: Edit <sdk location>\extras\google\usb_driver\android_winusb.inf to add the following to the [Google.NTx86] and [Google.NTamd64] sections: ;Kindle Fire %SingleAdbInterface% = USB_Install, ...


4

The kindle fire was just recently updated and the update removed root from the device, and it broke the Super One Click root method used. Once another root method is found (it may have been already) the developer of Super One Click will most likely update the application to support the Kindle Fire again. Here is an article from Engadget talking about the ...


4

Someone over at the XDA Forums already discovered how to do that. See link to the thread below. I strongly advise to follow this guide only if you know your way around the procedures mentioned (repacking & zipaligning an APK file, file system operations with root permissions) and wouldn't mind jumping through several hoops to recover your device if the ...


4

Just got a Kindle Fire as a gift. So far I've been more than disappointed. No apps No Amazon Prime membership. No Cloud. No MP3's No storage. Yes Facebook works. Yes I can check my email. Yes I can browse the web. Bottom line is, if you're in Canada, spend a few more bucks and get a tablet that you CAN use...


4

To do this, you'll need to root your Kindle Fire. To do that, you'll need to follow the procedure created by Justin Case at Android Police. Once that's through, you've got to install the Android app store, along with all the other Google stuff it needs. You'll find those instructions here. With that, you'll be all set. Good luck!


4

It is always enabled on the Kindle Fire. You simply need to add the Fire's device ID to your android_usb.ini file so that the Google ADB drivers will find it. You can do this from the command line very easily with: echo 0x1949 >> "%USERPROFILE%\.android\adb_usb.ini Then restart adb adb kill-server adb start-server And you should be good to go. ...


4

You can use Kindle Fire Utility to easily get root and Market with Google Apps. It has support for the latest Kindle Fire firmware (6.2.1 currently).


4

Summing up from the comments above... As eldarerathis wrote: "connected as a media device" suggests it's using MTP, which would require special software to be installed (there are MTP packages available for different Linux flavours). Try getting UMS working You might also want to check your "notification area" when the device is connected: I don't know ...


4

Short answer: You will have to root your device for that. Explanation: The shell user has no write permission there. The /data directory is not owned by shell, nor does their group match: on my Motorola Milestone 2, e.g., it is owned by system:system and has the permissions drwxrwxr-x, while shell belongs to the shell group only. Only on a rooted device you ...


4

In order to remove the book/app from your cloud, you'll need to visit Visit amazon.com/myk. Log into your account and find the book/app. Click the "actions" link to the right of the title. Under it you'll have the option to delete it permanently. After you do so, you'll have the repurchase the book if you want to read it again.


3

If you allow non-Appstore apps to be installed in your device, you can install Dropbox from their website. To do that, Click the gear icon in the top-right corner of the Kindle Fire home screen to activate the Settings window Click More Scroll down to Device Scroll down to ‘Allow Installation of Applications from Unknown Sources’ and move the slider ...


3

If you haven't tried this yet, I think you should try syncing your device. To sync the device, you tap on the settings button on the top right and select sync.


3

I haven't tested since I don't have my Fire yet, but it can be rooted with SuperOneClick, which means you can probably take screenshots with an app like ShootMe or Screenshot ER 2. I would think Amazon would advertise it if it could take screenshots without root, so I would suspect non-root users to be out of luck. That said, ShootMe has been known to work ...


3

This might help: How to take a screenshot with an Android phone? Basically Android doesn't provide you a direct way to take a screenshot the way iOS does. But Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich will.


3

Aha! As edlarerathis commented, you can change this in AWD settings. settings -> ADW settings -> system preferences -> Home orientation change from landscape to auto/sensor.


3

There are the two things of note that I see in your data: The instructions indicate that you should use fastboot -i 0x1949 boot u-boot.bin. This is actually not correct, because the fastboot boot command is intended for hotbooting a boot.img, not a bootloader (they are different). The original XDA instructions give the proper command, which is fastboot -i ...


3

The necessary .apk files for Google Play Store, Services Framework, etc., must be installed in /system/app and doing so requires root access. So, you must root the Kindle Fire in order to do so. However, you don't have to leave the Kindle Fire rooted. After you've installed it, you can always unroot the device (though I'm not sure why you'd want to do ...



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