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90

I had the same issue after upgrading the developer tools (v20.0.0v2012...). All of a sudden none of my android virtual devices would accept any input from my physical PC/Mac keyboard. This is how I fixed it: Eclipse > Window menu > AVD Manager Select your virtual device and click Edit Under Hardware, Click New Select Keyboard Support then click OK Edit ...


19

The Snapshot option speeds up the boot of the emulator by saving a snapshot of its RAM once it has booted, and restoring from that snapshot on future uses. That way, it doesn't have to run the boot process (which is slow, because it's emulated) every time you start the emulator. The Use Host GPU option uses the host computer's OpenGL implementation (which ...


18

The Android emulator gives you root access, you don't need to root it. Check out the emulator page on android.com for details on how to do things as root.


16

You can open a telnet connection to the AVD: telnet localhost 5554 then once connected: power capacity 100 or power status full Source: Android Developers: Using the Emulator


15

I guess what you mean is to install applications from the market on the Android emulator. Well, normally this is not possible and also not suggested. The emulator is mainly intended for development purposes. The problem is also that you'd need to get the Android market in order to be able to download apps (Angry Birds in your case), but the emulator doesn't ...


15

Try Android x86 as a virtual machine on Virtual Box. this is by far the best working android I have seen... It has the basic, default Android UI. It is fully functional. It works 4 times faster than my HTC Sensation Android X86 ISO files: http://code.google.com/p/android-x86/downloads/list How to install it: ...


11

Have you given the Amazon Appstore's Test Drive feature a try? Super simple, runs in most browsers - simply find an app in the store for which Amazon has Test Drive available then click the big green Test Drive button (a list of Test Drive apps is here). Once you have a Test Drive session open click the home button on the bottom of the emulator to access the ...


11

Please try the following settings. My environment (Target: Android 4.0.3 - API Level 15) successful. AVD - Edit - Hardware: - New... - Keyboard support - yes AVD - Edit - Hardware: - New... - Keyboard lid support - no


11

You can call between AVD's. Run 2 AVD, each will have diffrent number - it is placed on window title bar, example 5558. Call from one to other using this numbers. You can also text ;] In your AVD you simply cannot use real celluar network because your PC/Mac do not have built-in GSM modem (even if, AVD is not supporting this kind of feature).


10

You can certainly install the Amazon App Store app on the emulator. First go to the settings and allow installation of apps from unknown sources, then open the browser and download this app. This will download the app store .apk, which you can then install. However, if you are planning to download and run Angry Birds (or other games), on the emulator, you ...


10

Launch the emulator from the command line so that you can specify a /system partition size using the -partition-size <MB> option. For example, I use this to launch an emulator running Android 1.6 with a /system partition of 512 MB: emulator -avd Donut -partition-size 512 ...where "Donut" is whatever you named your AVD (you can check in Eclipse's AVD ...


9

If you're doing development in Eclipse, you don't need to turn off the emulator. If the debug/run button in Eclipse is set up properly, then Eclipse will close the current instance of your program inside the emulator, install your new program to the emulator, and start the program on the currently running emulator -- all without rebooting the emulator. Yes, ...


8

Lie Ryan makes a good point that once you start the emulator you don't need to close it when you are done testing a build. Leave it open and each time you run or debug your app it will automatically be re-loaded and launched. If you are having trouble with the size of the emulator you can modify the settings and have it display the actual size of the ...


7

You need to create a port forwarding to your Android device. This can be done with ADB. adb forward <local> <remote> - forward socket connections forward specs are one of: tcp:<port> localabstract:<unix domain socket name> ...


6

Unfortunately the emulator is extremely slow on all platforms. Better hardware will only get you so far. Edit: Since there are now native x86 versions of the emulator, performance should be considerably improved. You should be able to get them through the SDK (or through Intel's website, see this Stack Overflow post).


6

The emulator is slow because it's an qemu that emulates a whole different CPU architecture as it's used by consumer PCs: ARM (vs. x86(_64) on your PC) This means that every CPU instruction on the emulator's ARM CPU has to be emulated, which is per se slow. Also the emulator is AFAIK single-threaded. This means that speed-up can only be achieved by fast CPUs ...


6

The Android emulator doesn't currently support this, unfortunately. There is a configuration file in the build system that determines whether or not to enable the user accounts feature, and it is disabled in the emulator images distributed by Google. You can star this issue on the bug tracker in the meantime. However there are two alternatives you can look ...


6

The Snapshot option allows you to use a feature that's similar to the Hibernate function in Windows. It saves the contents of the emulator's memory to disk when you close the emulator, so that when you open it, it doesn't have to boot the OS, but instead it can load the memory contents from the disk and resume from where you left off. This allows you to ...


5

I think there is nothing to do to accelerate the emulator, it is just really slow. You'd better use a real device for tests, if possible.


5

Note that although Android OS itself is free (gratis and libre), Google's Android Market is not a free application (proprietary and device manufacturers have to pay license fee to Google if they want to legally include Market on their device); so installing Market on an emulator have a shady legality (though I doubt Google would knock on your front door, ...


5

you don't need an official "skin". You just need to figure out what screen dimensions and memory capacity the device you want to test has and create a deployment target file.


5

You already have a working vCard file (.vcf), just import it using GMail's web interface. If this VCF is still bad, you can apply simple text processing (regex search & replace) to it before importing it to Google. Here are the steps to import a vCard file into GMail using the web interface. Here's an excerpt from Google's help: Click Gmail at the ...


5

1. Using command line: Here's how you can copy files to an SD card image. You have to use adb push to copy files from Desktop to Emulator and adb pull for the reverse. Here's the syntax to copy files to or from an Emulator/Device Instance: Copy from desktop to emulator: adb push <local> <remote> Copy from emulator to desktop: adb pull ...


4

When you create a new AVD (Android Virtual Device). Under Hardware, click New: From the drop down list of Property, select Device ram size. Click OK. You can now put a value beside of Device ram size of how big you want it to be. Note: You have to create a new AVD. You can't edit them as far as I know.


4

The Android emulator is resetting the system image when rebooting. You can find the changed version of the system.img in your /tmp here: /tmp/android-username/ It usually has a name like emulator-*. Copy that file before shutting down the emulator.


4

I would say the simple answer is no. The emulator performs fairly poorly on high-end computers, so even if you got it to start up the performance would be beyond horrible.


4

You need to change the config.ini file in your .android directory. This file is found under the main hard drive directory. From there, open the avd file and you will see a list of virtual devices. Open the desired device and then open the config.ini in notepad. Then copy this text: "hw.keyboard = yes" (minus the quotes) and then save and close. The next time ...


3

There is a feature build into the Emulator, named Snapshot. Snapshot, basically saves an image of the emulator (in it's current state) when you close it. Then next time, you can start it from the same place. The emulator will start almost immediately, since it doesn't need to go through the boot process. Using Snapshot, I consistently can start my ...


3

If you're using a multicore machine, you could try to force the emulator to use more cores. The Android emulator uses a single core by default, and on some processors it can be really slow. However, this decreases the stability of the emulator. To do this, launch the emulator and press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to open Task Manager. Go to the Processes tab and ...


3

In addition to the other great answers here, this is sort of an obvious answer. Anyhow, I figured I'd add it to the list here. If you increase hardware specs on the development computer your running this on (most specifically RAM or hard disk spindle speed) you'll see an increase in the speed at which the Emulator starts up and runs. My development ...



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