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32

Sidestepping the debate over the legitimacy of installing that app on your phone, the question of verification is one that I've been meaning to understand for a while, and you've prompted me to try to figure out a possible way of verifying who signed an apk. Android apps are signed in the normal manner of .jar files (.apk is really just a special .jar which ...


26

Use DropBox. Put the APK in your DropBox folder. Open up the DropBox app on your phone, find the apk, tap on it, and it should download it to your phone and then install it. Use the SD card. Plug your phone into the computer via USB. Mount the SD card drive. Copy the APK into the SD card. Unmount your phone. Browse to the APK using a file browser app ...


26

I spent a decent amount of time trying to figure this out because I don't feel like having the "google experience" and as far as I can tell, it isn't possible. I've worked around it: The F-Droid repository and Amazon markets are both reasonably well maintained -- either will manage any apps you install, which is handy. That's where I start. Otherwise, I ...


21

There is no easy way to download an APK file. However, redphoenix89 has found a way to download the APK with a Chrome extension. bexton did some cleanups and the result including a guide is available: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1809458 The guide mentions that you need to disable SSL warnings, but I could download APKs even without ...


14

As Liam already pointed out, there's no danger involved for the developer. If one wants to grab the .apk for distribution, that's easily possible using apps like AppMonster, which can back up the .apk file to SD card. No extra protection from Google's side -- except users might feel more safe installing it from a "trusted source" (and they are right about ...


13

If you're using Android 2.2, you can move your applications to SD from Settings -> Applications -> Manage Applications. Before 2.2, you need to have root, create a separate partition in your SD card, and install a custom ROM that supports app2sd.


12

Another way... Place the .apk file onto your SD card (by using your phone as a mounted drive). Enable applications from unknown sources (go to Settings > Applications > then verify that Unknown Sources is selected). Use an application such as Installer or APK Manager to install the application.


12

As far as I know, you cannot download directly from the web Market, but you can find many apps on other app sites.


12

There is nothing dangerous about it, and this is done occasionally when the store isn't accessible. In response to your second question, apks are not unique - and can be easily transferred to another device, or the internet. This is the base of android app piracy. When you upload the APK to Google Play, GPlay does nothing to it. It is up to the developer ...


11

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/APK_(file_format) APK files are a variant of the JAR file format, which are built on the ZIP file format, with a .apk file extension.


11

As many others have said, you cannot download directly from the market. Android Phones with Google experience maintain a connection to Google's servers; it is over this channel that Google tells your phone to download & install the APK. Alternative markets & websites are certainly options - please note it can be hard to determine if the application ...


11

If you get lucky and your .apk file wasn't protected by Proguard or analog, you can use APK tool. It is a tool for reverse engineering 3rd party, closed, binary Android apps.


10

I prefer using the ADB. However, It's a little less user friendly. This isn't the easiest way, but it will work without an SD card and will work without the device being internet connected(some devices(tablets) aren't). At the command line you would type: adb install "full-absolute-path-to-apk-here.apk" The "tools" directory of the SDK must be in your ...


10

You can't download apk from market.android.com . But getjar has lots of app and you can download it to your PC.


10

Even if ProGuard was used you still can get some interesting insights. Here is a StackOverflow question with a detailed explanation: Android: Getting source code from an APK file. YouTube video with a detailed guide. And a blog entry about that: How to retrieve source code from an Android APK file.


10

Android does not natively back up applications so you can't "undo" an app update. Best thing I'd say you can do is something like this howto. It backs up your apks and their settings. It uses Titanium Backup and requires root, but rooting is not your problem.


9

You will need to push the .apk to the phone to the System partition to the folder /system/app or /system/priv-app when using Android 4.3 using adb. You can find more info about adb here: http://android-dls.com/wiki/index.php?title=ADB. In order to write to /system you likely have to remount it read-write: adb shell su mount -o rw,remount /system Now you ...


9

Try wget http://www.blah.com/files.apk in the terminal emulator (if you're using CyanogenMod, then you probably have BusyBox, which includes wget), you might need root to write to the internal memory, so if you don't have write permission in the current directory, then you might need to type su first.


9

One thing you could potentially do is get the android market on the android emulator (which I don't think your supposed to be able to do, but some people have done it in the past), and download the apk onto the emulator. Then, you can find the data in /data/app/-.apk on the emulator. Pull it off with adb, and install it on your device with adb. But like ...


9

Save as app name.apk and right click on that file and open with apk handler.exe which is located in C:\Program Files\blue stack.


8

Use a file manager to look in the following locations: /data/app /data/app-private /system/app/ /sdcard/.android_secure (shows .asec files, not .apks) On Samsung phones: /sdcard/external_sd/.android_secure You need to be rooted to view the first three.


8

If you have a file browser app installed, such as ASTRO, you can browse to the apk file on your SD card, click the apk, and it should pop up the apk installer.


8

It should be located at /data/app/. You can access that directly if you have root. If not, you will have to use adb pull. For example: adb pull /data/app/myapp.apk C:\backup\myapp.apk More info on adb: http://developer.android.com/guide/developing/tools/adb.html


8

If you don't have root access, it doesn't matter because you won't be able to back them up. If you do have root access, use an app like Titanium Backup to back up the apks. Note: This doesn't really answer the question of where to find the downloaded APKs, but it does address the need of the OP.


8

You cannot download apk files from http://play.google.com/store. There are other ways to get apps (alternative markets, developer sites) and you can install them manually provided you can turn on the "Unknown sources" setting.


8

As eldarerathis already pointed out in his comment on your question: If the app is already installed, and the certificate matches, you will be prompted whether you want to replace it. If the certificates differ, there's a conflict: The app cannot be updated due to the mismatch, and it cannot be installed along as the package name is already in use (apps use ...


8

An .apk is simply a .zip file. But unfortunatedly any app build for 'release' will probably be protected by ProGuard.


7

At least on my phone, it seems you need way more available space thanthe size of the app you are actually trying to upgrade. In my case it seems I needed to have at least ~13MB free space to upgrade anything at all (even for 500KB apps). Some tips to free space: Go to Settings, Applications, Manage Applications, click "Move to SD card" on the ones that ...


6

If you have a Samsung phone, some of them have separate "internal" and "external" SD storage. If it's on the external SD card, then you need this adress: file:///sdcard/external_sd/yourApp.apk


6

If I'm interpreting "on the computer" correctly to mean "I want to use the command line on my computer to read an .apk file's permissions" then you can do that with aapt on a local file like so: C:\>aapt d permissions "MyApp.apk" package: com.app.myapp uses-permission: android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE uses-permission: android.permission.INTERNET ...



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