New answers tagged

2

Google Play services is excluded because Google wants it so. It has to remained excluded from Doze or any power saving mode because apps depending upon Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) may fail to serve the user appropriately, hence, ruining the user's experience with Android big time. A GCM Android Client requires Play Store and Play services installed in ...


2

This is one reason, there may be more Google Play Services has location API. And your Android Device Manager (ADM) which you use to track your stolen or misplaced device uses location API. Let's say you forgot your phone leaving for home and on reaching home want to locate your phone by logging into ADM You can do that successfully only if your ADM (using ...


1

There is a free app MyAndroidTools which shows the logcat with the applications names responsible for the loggings.


0

Very old question but answering it as there is an app that fits Charge Cycle Battery Stats does that, from app description Charge Cycle Counter is a free App, that helps you to measure how often you charge your phone and keep track of your battery life. Features: - Total number of charge cycles - Daily statistics - Weekly statistics - ...


2

The Tag Dispatch System of Android Developers says Android-powered devices are usually looking for NFC tags when the screen is unlocked, unless NFC is disabled in the device's Settings menu. When an Android-powered device discovers an NFC tag, the desired behavior is to have the most appropriate activity handle the intent without asking the user what ...


3

Yes, booting the device is very expensive in terms of power consumption. Many reads from the storage and lots of computation needs to be done when booting the device so that you need considerable off time to justify turning it off. Android's power conservation features (deep sleep, dozing etc) allow you to keep your phone turned on all the time and still ...


1

Yes, this is completely normal (although on Android you would expect it to be combined with the "System" usage). See Kworker, what is it and why is it hogging so much CPU? "kworker" is a placeholder process for kernel worker threads, which perform most of the actual processing for the kernel, especially in cases where there are interrupts, timers, I/O, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included