Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

Aside from the actual power provided, there's another variable: Whether the device RECOGNIZES that the charger is capable of putting out the rated amps. Devices have some different strategies for recognizing what rating a charger has. Now when connected to a computer, it's easy - the numbers come across during USB enumeration. But when connecting to a dumb ...


19

I doubt that there is a direct correlation between battery consumption and RAM usage. The hardware doesn't know which RAM cells contain 'used' data and which not. So there can be no difference in battery consumption on that level. But I think that one could say that unnecessarily killing Apps causes a few extra CPU cycles when those Apps have to be ...


15

You can open a telnet connection to the AVD: telnet localhost 5554 then once connected: power capacity 100 or power status full Source: Android Developers: Using the Emulator


13

Think of RAM like a paper notebook. You can write data into the book (with a pencil), and you can erase those data and replace them with new data, but the book's always the same weight. The book doesn't get any heavier, whatever you write in it. The same way, with current RAM technology, the battery use of the RAM is fixed, regardless of what (if anything) ...


7

Short answer: yes and no. Using three accounts won't run the battery down in itself: by far the bigger factor is how much activity there is. To take an example, Gmail uses push messages (via Google Cloud Messaging, GCM) to notify your phone of new mail, so the phone doesn't have to repeatedly poll the server for new messages for each account. Because of ...


5

Battery level estimation is usually performed by a special “fuel gauge” chip; different phone models use different chips. E.g., Samsung GT-I8150 (Galaxy W), according to the kernel config, uses the Maxim MAX17043 chip, which, according to its datasheet, does not have any inputs to measure the current — it has only a battery voltage sensor. According to the ...


5

No, they don't behave differently if you don't use the original charger. I have a Samsung phone that has never even seen its original charger, along with some Nexus devices in similar conditions, and they don't suffer from slowdown or anything like this. More likely, your phone is running low on internal storage, or you've recently installed an app that ...


3

As using the device also uses some power, the device cannot "charge with the normal speed" at the same time. It will however primarily use the external power source for its consumption. Depending on whether you "consume" more power than the source can feed, either it compensates by taking whatever is needed additionally from the battery, or feeds whatever is ...


3

My answer for you is twofold; there are innate downsides to off-brand devices but - most importantly - your use case (development and application purposes) might make off-brand Android phones a poor choice. This is from my experience with the phones (I have a lot, having lived in Asia for years, and seeing a lot here in the States) First, the general ...


3

mA is not the same as mAh. The former is a current rating, and the latter is the capacity of the battery. 1000 mAh means the battery can supply a current of 1000 mA (at its rated voltage) for 1 hour, or equivalently, a current of 500 mA for 2 hours, etc. It tells you how much energy the battery can hold. The number in mA printed on the phone tells you how ...


3

If you're needing it as always-on wall plugged you will probably need to stick with that. However newer devices stop charge when 100% and then recharge back from ~95%. Answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/6654233/3288281 Says that you simply can't use any software to stop the charging.


3

Most of the battery saving applications are better termed as "settings managers", if you already know how to turn things on & off there isn't much they can do for you. Plus it is another application now running. Newer phones also have employed better hardware , better techniques and more power savings into the whole system, improving that before ...


3

We are using Exchange on serveral devices at the office (for testing) and what i noticed is that sometimes exchange services seem to drain alot of battery even when set to a low interval or push. This typically happens when Exchange is trying to pull some data from the server but an error occurs. The end user (you) does not always see the error. For me ...


3

Battery app re-calculates the remaining battery based on the battery power currently being used (mV) and history. That's why you can do calibration to correctly measure the current battery status and range of it. In most case, battery power (mV), it goes down from the top and it usually up & down within a small range but for overall, it goes down. But ...


2

Tasker is an app that can be used to automate changing settings on your device, based on various events like when you leave range of a wifi AP, or when you enter a geographic area. You can have a look through the Tasker tag here for some idea of the jobs it can be used for, and how to configure it.


2

I don't know for the Droid Charge in special, but on many phones you can turn off the radio separatly. And even if that doesn't work, in your case it should be fine to simply enter airplane mode, and then activate WiFi again (plus Bluetooth, when needed) -- which eventually has the very same effect. I remember having used Dazzle Configurable Switcher for ...


2

Here are the real expert answers from Electrical Engineering, our sister site: Effects of smartphones always connected to AC power? Not directly related, but also a nice read: Tricking the charging circuit considered harmful TL;DR: The charging circuit is safely engineered to be connected to the charging circuit 24/7.


2

I had similar problems and used Llama, then expanded my use of it to cover other events. It is similar to Tasker, and sufficient to my needs, while still a free app. Most automation can be triggered by entering/leaving cell tower range that is recognized as "Home". It has options to turn on Airplane mode automatically when the phone leaves a cell reception ...


2

You should calibrate your battery: Fully discharge your phone Fully charge it when it is turned off Disconnect charger and wait a minute Connect it again and turn your phone on Delete your data/system/batterystats.bin file (with battery calibration for instance) Reboot your device and disconnect charger Also, it is common problem, so try to google it ...


2

This issue gets pretty clear by the second screenshot, which I will repeat here: Battery usage (click image for larger variant) Please pay attention to its lower half, just below the graph, and let me point out some details: Mobile network signal: This bar has no black, which means the radio was on all the time. Further, the colors indicate a relatively ...


2

It's fully possible to do that if the charge-from device has USB On-The-Go (OTG) support. You just need a USB OTG host cable (like this one), which you connect to the charge-from device, then plug a normal micro-USB cable into that, then into the device to be charged. The only obstacle you may run into is current limitations. A USB OTG port almost ...


2

To be honest, it sounds like a hardware fault in the phone, especially since you say it's been happening since you bought the phone. If the phone were still new, I'd say you should take it back to the shop, but by flashing a new ROM you've voided the warranty. To answer your question: no, it's not normal for that phone. I've known a few Galaxy S2 owners, ...


1

Don't you worry. LiIo batteries are not that concerned about that. What really lowers their life span are "complete discharges", not frequent "trickle-charging". It's even recommended to charge them as soon/often as possible (and practicable, of course). See e.g. Wikipedia: Lithium Ion batteries for details, and also take a look at our question Does ...


1

The Incredible 2 has a defective charging port that does not typically last a long time. It is an extremely common issue with this phone. Chances are, this is what you are seeing. Disclaimer: I have been using my current dinc2 for ~18 months and haven't had this issue yet, but I did see it on a used phone I attempted to buy. Anyway, my plan for if/when this ...


1

I have the same experience with Wifi, I find leaving it on is much more convenient (your phone will prioritize Wifi over 3/4G, resulting in faster speeds and lower bills), and power consumption is negligible. The only time when turning off Wifi conserve me some serious battery is back from my days with a Sony p990i, which runs UIQ3. Ah, old times...


1

Did you try a different battery? Is this one the factory one? It may be faulty and possibly not charging reliably. If worst comes to worst, you can try reflashing your GNexus with the default google 4.3 yakju images (after backing up all your data of course) to see if the problem goes away. If it does not then the battery needs to be replaced. Here is a ...


1

There are a lot of theories and myths about battery life and I haven't seen enough statistically significant data to support any of those 'theories'. I have heard that it is bad to use a phone while it is plugged in but I will tell you why I think this is wrong. From my own experience as an Android developer, my phone is ALWAYS plugged in when I am at my ...


1

It is okay to use another battery as a backup. But if you switch the batteries frequently, you may end up with damaging your phone. Even though the chance for this a very low, it is still a chance. When you change the battery frequently, you have to turn on and off the device. When you do this, the inserted battery spends power to start and turn-off your ...


1

There are slightly different opinions around on this topic. To fully understand the issue, one needs to first understand how LiIo batteries work (which goes a little too far for our site, so please read details on Wikipedia). Lie Ryan is absolutely right: LiIo batteries don't take it well to be fully discharged. It shouldn't be done too often. I'm not sure ...


1

This part of your screenshot you can find explained (partly) in my answer to What is Cell standby and how can I keep it from eating my battery?. But more specifically to your question, here's what it is about: Network signal: Quality of the signal (colors are explained in this answer) GPS on: Whether GPS was actively used Awake: some app requested a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible