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11

You will find a good explanation including graphics to visualize what's going on in the article The Android boot process from power on. Basically, the steps are as follows: execute Boot ROM code. This is stored in a hardware-specific area and keeps information on where to find the first stage of the boot loader, which is then loaded into RAM. You can ...


10

I think you have caught yourself out, in short, nothing you can do! Have a look at this source that explains why, specifically in this section: System Partition and Safe Mode The system partition contains Android's kernel as well as the operating system libraries, application runtime, application framework, and applications. This partition is set ...


10

Single user boot is a feature of the init daemon (initd, like sysVinit) and not the Linux kernel. Since Android only shares the kernel with Linux and not the init process, a genuine single user boot can not be achieved. Android has something that is called "Recovery Mode", but it's not exactly the same as a single user boot on an Unix system. The approach ...


10

While looking around my Android filesystem, I found that it did, in fact have a /etc/init.d/ directory. After peeking around in there, I found /etc/init.d/20userinit with the following lines: if [ -e /data/local/userinit.sh ]; then log -p -i -t userinit "Executing /data/local/userinit.sh"; busybux chmod +x /data/local/userinit.sh; logwrapper ...


8

I don't know of a free solution, though there may be one. I do know of Autostarts, currently just under 1 USD, a pretty good price in my opinion. It gives you a list of applications that have attached themselves to different events in the Android OS (I'm not an Android programmer, my wording is likely wrong there). You can then choose to disable that ...


7

Boot process of embedded system is similar to PC from overview level, but slightly different from microscopic level. Here's the boot process of an Android device: PC-BIOS/BootMonitor, MBR and GRUB/LILO etc are all combined in one Boot Strap Firmware called Bootloader. Its init.S initializes stacks, zeros the BSS segment and calls _main() in main.c. The ...


7

OK. I found the correct combination. It seems that the recovery distributed with Cyanogenmod 10 M2 for galaxysmtd is really picky about the hardware buttons. Here's how you can boot to recovery: Start with Galaxy S powered off Press and hold Volume up + Home Press and hold Power button Wait for (factory default) Galaxy S GT-I9000 boot display to show up ...


7

Please clarify what is the intended goal and why? Android phones have their own boot-loaders and cannot be overridden by other means. It is not like a PC's BIOS where you can switch the ordering of boot to boot from certain devices such as Network PXE, USB, Primary/Secondary H.D.D... Edit: After the comments below, and in relation to the OP's question ...


6

/data/init.sh runs at boot, if you have root you can edit it as you like. Be careful ;) Edit: Apparently you might need to shoehorn the edited script into the boot image as well. Info on how to do that here: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=443994


6

Download and install the Android SDK. On your handset's manufacturer website find and download USB drivers for your device, and install them. On your phone go to Menu -> Settings -> Applications -> Development and enable the USB debugging option. Now when connect the phone to your PC via USB, you should see the "USB debugging connected" ongoing ...


6

Android runs the Linux Kernel for the core system and it can be (and is) optimized for various platforms (compiled for ARM, x86, x64, PPC, etc). Here is a fantastic graphic to demonstrate this for you: Source: Post on Unix.SE Android relies on Linux version 2.6 for core system services such as security, memory management, process management, ...


6

The bootloader is not generally on the /boot partition, it's on a separate one, although that's not really the crux of the issue. The problem occurs when the bootloader is cryptographically signed, which is intended to prevent you from replacing it with your own. The device will check the signature of the bootloader at startup and refuse to boot one with an ...


5

Ok so I found the solution. It was stuck in a bootloop. Instructions can be found here. Bootloop problem Pull your battery ( If you're already in your recovery skip to step 3) Use your hardware buttons to boot your phone into amon-ra or clockwork recovery (google to find out how if you're unsure) Use your hardware buttons to boot your phone into amon-ra ...


4

This requires a rooted phone. There is a good guide here: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1103399 If you don't have ADB, get the full Android SDK from here: http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html (it might come in useful multiple times, and all app developers should already have it). Don't trust websites offering ADB alone unless it ...


4

While the logcat option recommended by Ryan of course is a valid possibility, it is not the most user-friendly solution. I've got a better idea :) Apps started automatically after boot registered for a certain event, called BOOT_COMPLETED. To do so, they need to request this permission (you find it under "more" on the playstore pages) called "Start after ...


3

To fix my device I did the following: pull the battery to get the device to stay off (if you are quick you might be able to hold the power button and select shut down before it reboots) While the device is off hold both volume buttons and the power button. This will bring up a bootloader menu Use the volume buttons to change selection to "Recovery Mode" ...


3

First, make that video player default for video files. Then, use Tasker to Open File on boot. Open File action can be found in File action category. Device Boot context can be found in Event ~> System category.


3

When your phone is not turned on it can't have a adb service running (Disregarding the possible technical difficulties it would also be a security issue.) Try the following instead: 1. Take out your battery and connect the phone to a charger 2. Your phone should now turn on. 3. Insert your battery. It worked on my current and on my previous phones (ZTE ...


3

There is an application called Startup Cleaner (Free). Startup Cleaner does not require root, however just like Saiboogu said, you cannot actually prevent application from starting up without rooting. Startup Cleaner register itself at boot time, and then kills applications that you want to prevent from starting up at boot time; and after some time it kills ...


3

Have you tried doing a factory reset (you'll lose all data)? Steps to do a factory reset are found here. 1. Power off the G1 2. Hold Home Key + End key for 20 seconds or until you see a "triangle with an exclamation point and a picture of the G1" 3. Open the QWERTY keyboard and hit Alt+W 4. Restored!


3

The reason it does not work properly is this: The init.rc script resides in within the RAMDisk attached to the boot image. Hence the init.rc script that was edited and pushed across is now overwritten by the boot image's own script upon reboot - effectively changes are lost! You need to extract the boot image, using every boot image has the kernel and ...


3

This depends a little on the device and what version of Android you have. On versions of Android later than 4.1 you can access safe mode by bringing up the power down menu (i.e. hold the power button) and long pressing the "Power off" option. This will bring up a little dialog box that will ask if you want to reboot into safe mode. The addition is noted on ...


3

The short answer is that it's different for each phone. There's no generic "install Android" procedure for two reasons: Unlike on a PC, where the Windows installer or Debian installer has drivers to access (almost) any PC hardware, in embedded devices each model needs a ROM image specific to that combination of hardware. The first part of any installation ...


2

Unless they're something physically defective with your device your options are pretty limited: Install a ROM designed to boot quickly (not sure that any exist) Install a ROM based on a less resource-intensive version of Android (but there's no point in getting a Xoom if you don't run 3.0 IMO) Use an app like Autostarts to prevent some apps from loading ...


2

I achieve on this using Tasker. For the apps in the SD card I created a profile with the context Events -> Hardware -> Card Mounted and it loads all apps I want. For the apps in the phone I created a profile with the context Events -> System -> Device Boot and it loads all apps I want. Note: The first thing you MUST do before anything in both of this ...


2

I had the very same problem with my IO tablet (samsung logo loop, sometimes the upload_cause screen, but never actualy booted). Took me a lot of try/fails before I found a working solution. And this is it: You have to reflash not only the stock rom, but the stock bootloader too. I followed this tutorial and my tablet is working without a hitch! Good luck! ...


2

My Galaxy Nexus (I9250, GSM version) with Android 4.02 definitely doesn't take that long to boot. Just switched mine off to test, and from off it takes just under a minute to get to the SIM card PIN unlock code screen (and after entering my PIN it goes straight to the pattern lock with my normal wallpaper).


2

After flashing a new firmware it is advised to perform a factory reset (all your data will be lost, so take a backup.) While the phone is off: Press the VOLUME UP, HOME and POWER buttons together till it vibrates. Now it has entered RECOVERY MODE. Navigating using the volume buttons highlight the option wipe data/factory reset and press the HOME button to ...


2

i had the same issue with screen not coming to live after proximity sensor has turned it off once. I tried to boot in safe-mode and the phone is working perfectly and there is no such issue in safemode. I know this is not permanent solution (there must be some limitations of safemode, though i have no idea about them), but it atleast points us that this is ...


2

I have finally fixed my phone. Thank you @Matthew Read @ctt for your help!!!:) I am really sorry that I asked more then one question about this. I was just panicking that my phone wasn't working. I have managed to install a custom rom to my Htc Wildfire S. This is the rom I used. I had to to a factory reset and I had to delete all the cache. Thanks again ...



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