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I believe I have a similar problem and shall update this answer as I find more information. What variant of Samsung Galaxy S II do you have? These steps could help: Fresh reboot by pulling battery, SIM card and any external SD card out for a while (some sources I have read say to wait over an hour). Clear the cache partition (this is safe, no data loss): ...


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No. Even if you could add such a restriction within Android, it would still be possible for an attacker to boot into recovery or into fastboot mode and reset the phone from there. If you're trying to protect the confidentiality of your data (i.e. stop an attacker accessing it), then encrypting the phone is what's required for that. If you're trying to ...


2

Posting this not so much for the asker, since it was asked ten hours ago, but for others who find this question: Lollipop's first boot can take a long time. On my Nexus 4, after the OTA update from 4.4.4, it took about half an hour. At least 10 minutes of this was spent in the "flying colours" boot screen. I'd make sure it has power, and leave it for at ...


1

When doing updates, be it from OTA or flashing, you will need to wipe/clean the cache and dalvik-cache (They retain information that could cause problems as well as bootloops.) Just remember to leave system, data, and other partitions alone.


1

Everything (the bootloader, the recovery, and the full system) is stored in the same flash storage, with different partitions for each. The bootloader has its own partition which also holds the kernel for the main system. The recovery has its own partition: it needs to be separate from the main system, else it would be no use for "recovering" or flashing a ...


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I'm seeing the same issue. Booted into download mode, and neither fasboot nor ADB see the device (MacOS 10.9). They are working for me on my Nexus 5, so it's not an ADB/fastboot driver issue or anything.


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Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) is supposed to be a tablet-exclusive OS, and it's already deprecated. It's replaced by Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) which unites the OS both for phones and tablets. As for official OTA, I couldn't find any information about that, so it seems that Android 2.3.6 (Gingerbread) is the latest official Android version available for the ...


2

Had the same issue right now. fastboot oem lock didn't find the device. Disconnected the device from USB and held the power button for 10s to reset. Booted like a charm afterwards


-1

Had the same problem and decided to turn it off and after it turned itself back on and fixed the problem. (So dont everyone freak out it might just need to be turned off really quick)


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Had exactly the same on my Nexus 7 2012 just now. Flashed the factory image, device remained stuck at the boot logo. went to bootloader and did "fastboot erase cache" along with "fastboot erase userdata". Still the same never ending boot logo. Put the device back into bootloader mode again, ran "fastboot oem lock", restarted and the device quickly ...


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I'm having this exact same issue. I'm going to try flashing 4.4 again and see if I can at least get it up and running again. Edit: I was able to get it booting my locking the bootloader. (run fastboot oem lock from bootloader)


2

According to the CyanogenMod Wiki, you should be able to flash each partition separately – if you've got an image for it. Quoting: Common fastboot commands fastboot flash recovery recovery.img fastboot flash boot boot.img fastboot flash cache cache.img fastboot flash userdata userdata.img fastboot flash system system.img Following this list ...


1

I recently wiped my phone to factory after I had rooted the phone and got rid of the bloatware I did not want. (Forgot the passcode) I thought I would have to root my phone again and then get rid of factory installed bloatware....again. I was pleasantly surprised to find both that the root was intact AND the bloatware was still gone. Also, my superuser app ...


0

No you can't install a CM Rom without having the correct bootloader. You will brick your device or end up bootlooping it. Download and flash correct HBOOT, then continue with your choice of Rom. as per your wiki link "Pay close attention to the HBOOT revision as newer updates break the tool's ability to work properly"


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Basically for rooting a device you need to unlock the boot loader so that you can format the stock O.S which is supposed to boot on switching ON the device and replace with a custom OS.You can check whether the device boot loader is locked or unlocked by connecting your device via the ADB debug drivers to the Android develop tools(ADT). (OR) Simply ...


0

First off, you don't get your warranty back, you hide that you unlocked and rooted in the first place (so you never "actually" lost warranty) . I don't know Samsung devices all that well, have you tried booting into fastboot and doing "fastboot oem lock"? If your device doesn't have fastboot obviously this won't work. Usually carriers and the phone companies ...



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