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20

It is not detectable, but using tethering on Android with an second device leaves a lot of traces: User-Agent Headers within HTTP that come from non-mobile browser Increased Traffic consumption Connection to services that are not available on Android/Smartphone devices (e.g. World of Warcraft) and many more I can't think of atm. But I have never heard ...


16

Whether or not you can use a phone on a specific carrier depends on a variety of factors, but it is generally possible to figure it out provided that you can find enough information on the device and carrier you are interested in. The main points to focus on will be the cellular standard the carrier uses, the frequency bands it uses, and the associated ...


4

You cannot. HTC Merge is a CDMA phone and US Cellular is a CDMA network, while T-Mobile is a GSM carrier. The two technologies are not compatible, and it's not possible to use phones between them.


4

On most phones you can still enable Wi-Fi while in airplane mode. In fact, many airlines now have Wi-Fi in flight. Airplane mode might be a more viable option than you think ;)


3

Phono is able to replace the carrier's name with a logo: Phono (source: Google Play; click image to enlarge) Take a look at above screenshot. See the T logo in the upper left, on the notification bar? That's placed by Phono. It additionally offers a bunch of widgets to show you network strength and other things, plus some shortcuts (as shown in the ...


3

I use Current Caller ID and it seems to work ok, better if you let it connect with Facebook. It is not perfect but it will help out. I also use Reverse Lookup. It is after the fact, but it does a good job. it will google the number and quickly add it to your phone book if you want. Neither are going to get you coverage all the time but it is the best I ...


3

I'm not sure it would be legal for them to discriminate on warranty just because a phone is rooted. However, there are some "void your warranty" things you could do when rooted (such as overclock way high, etc). You might find a tool on XDA to restore an original ROM, I did once for a bricked phone. They may have such a tool in-store too.


3

They don't have to change the ROM on every phone by hand. They have a relationship with the phone's manufacturer, so the carrier's customized ROM gets installed on the phones at the factory. This customized ROM might include their boot animation, bloatware, settings (e.g. APNs) for their network. These phones often also have slightly modified hardware: the ...


3

It has to do with the contracts that carriers have with the manufacturers. They also have to do testing of the deployments, to make sure they "go off without a hitch". If the updates fails for users, the carrier is the one that has to take the service call. They also have to do training for their customer services people on how to handle any update issues. ...


3

To check for phone updates, go into Applications > Settings > About Phone and tap System updates or check for updates. However, if a new update comes out, then you should get a notification informing you so and giving you update instructions. If you root your phone, then you could install unofficial updates that are not from T-Mobile. There are instructions ...


2

According to AndroidCentral and these XDA posts, the Photon 4G is specifically made to prevent access to AT&T or T-Mobile and an unlock code won't do anything. Presumably so that if you are in the US and don't need to roam away from Sprint, you can't switch away from Sprint. The limitation doesn't appear to have been hacked around yet.


2

If you unlock the phone (as presumably you did to get it on Metro PCS), you should be able to flash the Virgin ROM and activate it on Virgin. However, you should call Virgin and ask! They can best answer this question, and you'll need them to activate the phone on their network anyways.


2

You could use a VPN to "mask" all your traffic. This way your provider would still be able to count the amount of data transfered -- but he would no longer be able to see its contents. VPN requires a client (which comes already integrated with recent Android versions -- but additionally, there are a lot of apps available for this on the Google Playstore) ...


2

I highly doubt it's to do with being 'pre-paid' or not. More likely, it could be from a number of reasons. Such as internet connection where carriers can limit the download file size. I personally know that DL'ing larger files over the carrier network will fail unless it has a 'resume' or some sort of authentication feature.


2

This feature is called WiFI Tethering, it comes with most modern Android devices. You can read more about it on our wifi-tether tag.


2

Some SmartPhones like the Samsung Galaxy S2 lets you create a Wi-Fi hotspot. Unfortunately, this would decrease the phone's battery life, which is why having a separate device would be better option.


2

IMO it is neither within the carrier's moral nor legal duty to warrant damages caused by the owner's mishandling. Some carriers/shops might decide to do the replacement anyway because the cost of investigating these cases are often higher than replacement, but unless it is explicitly stipulated within the warranty contract, don't expect it as an entitlement. ...


1

As far as I know, phones don't report to the carrier if they are smartphones or not. They only report their unique IMEI number, from which they can't tell the type of your phone. (Unless they ask the manufacturer.) Also it is illegal to change. The carrier forcing you to pay for a data plan simply because you have a smartphone would be weird and highly ...


1

It might be possible in some cases (I know Sony has released blobs before for ROM devs to use), but generally OEM's have agreements with carriers and release only carrier-laden ones. I know you said "without rooting", but you could technically flash a custom recovery and from there flash a "de-bloated" stock ROM from another developer. I know it's probably ...


1

I'm not sure there's a good answer to this. As you've seen from your own research, experiences vary. Therefore, if you send in a rooted or otherwise modified phone, you may have a problem. If you unroot / unmod it before you send it in, then you're much less likely to have problems. In your case, with it being hard bricked, you probably don't have much of a ...


1

Depending on where you are in the world, and which carrier you're with, your phone will have a unique model. You can find your phone's model number by going to Settings > About device and it'll be around the middle of the page. North American models Carrier Name Model Identifier AT&T (US) SGH-I747 Bell Mobility (CAN) ...


1

Yes, it will be compatible. Google has already mentioned that it will be compatible with over 200 networks worldwide. That includes Airtel India as well. I have bunch of friends who are using Galaxy Nexus in India. Voice calls and 3G/2G works smoothly. The same should be true about Nexus 4 as it is also an unlocked device like the Galaxy Nexus.


1

If you get a device working on a specific carrier or not depends on the following factors: cellular standards and frequency bands artificial locks on the device and sometimes willingness of the carrier First, check what your future carrier and phone have. For carrier networks and frequencies Wikipedia is the most complete source I know: ...


1

While your carrier wouldn't be able to directly detect you are using WiFi hotspot, they might notice that you are using a lot of data. This is often a red flag in their systems, and might get you a phone call and/or your bandwidth throttled/capped. WiFi hotspot is not available on all devices. For instance, my og Droid with stock ROM doesn't offer this due ...


1

Balance Update / USSD blocker You can install this app to block the Flash messages This Does not support Android 4.2.2


1

This looks like a special kind of SMS message, sometimes called "flash SMS", that shows up instantaneously on the phones screen. I don't think that there is an option to block these messages and even if it would be possible I wouldn't encourage you to do so, because you could maybe miss some other important information. I think the best approach would be to ...


1

To copy from Al's answer here: If there is an official update to Android 2.3 (check the post on Gingerbread updates) then you'll get a notice on your phone (eventually). Just follow the instructions. If there's not an official update and you don't want to wait for one, you'll need to root your phone and install a Custom ROM.



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