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11

I've used RealmB's Android Certificate Installer to great success. You simply upload your PEM encoded (.cer or .pem) file and then point your phone's browser to the link that is provided. No need for a private key.


7

On ICS or later you can check this in your settings. Go to Settings->Security->Trusted Credentials to see a list of all your trusted CAs, separated by whether they were included with the system or installed by the user. Earlier versions of Android keep their certs under /system/etc/security in an encrypted bundle named cacerts.bks which you can ...


4

I was looking into the same issue, and it was answered on XDA http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2537794 In short - it is possible if your phone is rooted to move the certificate to the System section. Very annoying that it is not possible to exclude certificates from this warning - it only produces noise when I know that the cert is OK to ...


4

For other people looking for this answer who can't use realmB's solution because they can't access the internet on their phone...I just changed the file extension of my certificates from .cer to .crt and everything worked fine! Thanks to the users of this forum for the lead on the solution.


4

For Android 2.2, the certificates (without renaming or converting) can be placed at the root of the sd card. To install: Go to the Settings/Security menu, Credential storage section. Activate Use secure credentials. Click Install from SD card. A menu will appear with the available certificates. Click on each certificate to install. Those certificates ...


4

Lookout Mobile has blogged about this due to the DigiNotar events, and provided some pretty good (read: lengthy) instructions which you can find here. The gist of it is that you need to pull /system/etc/security/cacerts.bks and then remove the CAs from the store, then push the store back to the device and reboot. Their instructions require that you have ...


3

At least on 2.2.1 I can see the options to use certificates. First you have to install the certificates by placing them on your sdcard and using Settings -> Location and security -> Install encrypted certificates. Then you can add the network from Settings -> Wireless and network -> Wi-Fi settings -> Add Wi-Fi network. Select 802.1x EAP as the ...


3

First: Android only understands binary format of CA and only with file format *.crt. Second: Android only understands user certificates in *.p12 file format. So You can check whether your CA file binary or text very simple: open it with any text editors^ If there something like 0‚ i0‚ Т , then it is binary. If you see something like ...


3

I had an issue with something similar a few years back - and I believe this thread helped (see Lynx's post about halfway down). (I know it's a bit old - but I remember it being very helpful). I believe the certificate also needs to be very generically titled "certificate.p12" or something like that (if I recall correctly). Make sure it's in the root of ...


3

I've described how to do exacly this on my page, "Installing CAcert certificates on Android as 'system' credentials without lockscreen - instructions" at http://wiki.pcprobleemloos.nl/android/cacert I've also posted it on the cyanogenmod forum: ...


3

I figured out a workaround. The workaround is to download a File Manager tool and then double click the .p12 cert, which opens up and prompts for the password. I still don't know why the control panel doesn't do what it suggests, but at least I found a solution.


2

Rename the file with an extension of .crt and place it in your SD card /download folder. Put the SD card back into your device (or remount it, if internal) and navigate to SETTINGS > SECURITY & PRIVACY > INSTALL CERTIFICATE FROM SD CARD. Hopefully that ought to do the trick, else try this online Certificate Installer tool - it gives you a link that you ...


2

I had the same problem getting Android to really install the certificate, until I found this site which describes a method that worked for me. It boils down to the following steps: Create a private key and public x509 certificate with v3_req extensions and enabled as a CA: sudo openssl req -x509 -nodes -days 365 -newkey rsa:4096 -keyout ...


1

Your best bet will be to build it from source. There are a few StackOverflow questions that you might want to reference if you haven't already. How to use openSSL Library in the ANDROID application How to build OpenSSL on Android/Linux ? Openssl Build Issue with Android NDK r8 The first SO has an answer linking to a GitHub project ...


1

I've written an article on creating & installing CAcert certificates as Android System Certificates (Android >=4.2), thus allowing you to use your device without lockscreen: http://wiki.pcprobleemloos.nl/android/cacert Main part of my article: cat root.crt > 5ed36f99.0 openssl x509 -inform PEM -text -in root.crt -out /dev/null >> 5ed36f99.0 ...


1

I've discovered a solution that works without additional software or manual file copying: Set your lock screen to "pattern". Enter a pattern and an unlock PIN. Remember the unlock PIN. Install your user certificate. Turn the screen off and on. Enter the pattern wrongly a few times, until the "Forgot pattern?" option appears. Click "Forgot pattern?", scroll ...


1

The problem with disabling the lockscreen security using the toggle/profile is that the lockscreen widgets don't appear either so you can't slide to unlock. Also, when you reboot your phone the buttons don't work until you retoggle the setting again. Another way is to install the certificate as usual then backup the /data/misc/keychain and keystore ...


1

From http://sknetlog.blogspot.com/2011/03/digital-certificate-installation-on.html Save your .p12 or .cer certificate to external SD card in root directoy. Navigate "Home" --> "Applications" --> "Settings" Select "Location and Security" Under "Credential storage" have the first item "Use secure credentials" selected / checked Select "Install encrypted ...


1

The option to choose a certificate is available with enterprise encryption (802.1x). Judging by your comment, your android thinks it is using a different encryption method than it should, so have you attempted manually adding the network, and specifying the encryption type? Please bear in mind that not all wifi cards and devices support that encryption ...


1

I connect with my Samsung GSII with CM9 to my eduroam network in the university of alicante. Here you have the link with instructions in english I followed on how to configure the wifi network: http://si.ua.es/en/wifi/eduroam/peap/eduroam-installation-for-android.html However, the issue is simple, you have to go to wifi settings, and add a new network ...


1

The CACert Application should work; it doesn't work on older devices. You may also want to use the curated list the Guardian Project puts out: rationale here; direct link here. Requires 2.2 or newer.


1

To be honest I had never removed a cert before but I've added my own and it looks like it's the same process. It's basically: use Linux (or a vm of Linux) install bouncycastle (java SSL library) download the cacerts.bks files from the device use keytool -delete command to remove the cert from cacerts.bks verify that it worked with keytool push the ...



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