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14

The typical audio only jack has 3 rings, usually call Tip, Ring, Sleeve (TRS). These typically map to Left, Right, and Ground. Phone manufactures wanted to make this jack work with existing headphone so they used a connector with 4 rings, called Tip, Ring, Ring, Sleeve (TRRS). These map to Left, Right, and Ground just like the 3 ring, but the final connector ...


14

You google apps will work exactly the same as before; either they'll be prepackaged with CM or you will download an update pack that will install them for you. Battery/radio/GPS issues are mostly related to specific hardware. You'd have to check the CM forums and wiki for your phone model to answer that one. Compatibility is an issue for some apps, but in ...


9

The theory is that you should not need to know. When the developer publishes an app there is a manifest.xml file that describes the required capabilities. These can be both hardware and firmware related. e.g. you need a minimum Android version or you need a specific hardware feature like GPS. Google Play then automatically filters which apps you can see ...


8

In general, NO. Some apps: run on specific devices only (i.e. not compatible with S4) run on specific Android versions available only in specific countries available only on specific carriers requires root access. (i.e. if phone is not rooted, it won't work)


7

When developers make apps, they have to specify any hardware/software requirements in a file called the androidmanifest.xml file. These can be hardware or software requirements, such as if the app needs GPS, or telephony features - or if it will only work on a certain Android version. When you use Google Play, it sends your device's 'features' to the ...


6

It could mean that your phone does not meet either software or hardware requirements, or both. You could probably spoof the identity of your phone (so that it could be recognized as Samsung Galaxy S4 for example, instead of HTC Salsa), but you can't expect the app to work properly in this case. So, I would suggest to get an updated / higher-end phone ...


6

Yes, a "regular" set of headphones will work just fine, in much the same way that a single-channel earphone works in a stereo headphone jack. The other bits are for the microphone and the controls, but since your headphones won't have those it won't matter. I have had occasion to use 1st generation iPod earbuds as well as some generic earbuds in my Galaxy ...


6

There is no particular phone that's ideal, given the app devs can choose to support whatever subset of devices they wish. The Nexus devices are probably the most likely to be broadly compatible though. You can't brick with build.prop as far as I know, though you can certainly prevent your phone from booting if you change the wrong setting. Make a backup ...


6

It depends. If an application uses features present in Android 2.3, then it will not work on 2.2 or lower. If it only uses features present in older versions, then it will work on those older versions. For example, an app written for 2.1 (i.e., an app that only uses features from 2.1 or lower) will work on 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.0, and 3.1 (and any future ...


5

Android-x86 seems to be the most current project, with nightly builds available at http://android-x86.moonman.dk/ I think the lack of activity one sees isn't so much a licensing/warez problem, it's just that the OS simply doesn't work too well with desktop systems yet, being highly phone & touch-centric. That and there's simply not a lot of interest ...


4

I haven't seen any Android system supporting NTFS out-of-the-box. Could be some CustomROMs do, or there are some "root mods". So without root, it might get hard (though there might be some UserSpace mods as well, technically spoken). If your device is rooted, you could take a look at NTFS Mounter, which might or might not support your Huawai (take care to ...


4

You need to find a WiFi dongle with a chipset the device supports. Each chipset requires different drivers, so you'll have to find one that's supported. There a discussion thread on the site you linked to about exactly this.


4

Google Play lets app developers restrict which devices their apps can be installed on. Developers target specific device characteristics (screen size, keyboard configuration, software version, hardware specs, geographic location, carrier, etc) by specifying them in the app's manifest. Google Play then filters which users can install the app given their ...


3

Application developers can set their own requirements in the play store for what must be present before a game or application will be available. For example, it is possible to require a device has a camera, or has a screen larger than a given size, or has support for a particular version of OpenGL. The HTC Salsa is equipped with an ARMv6 CPU (MSM7227), ...


3

No there are not all compatible. When you watching an application on Google play ( from your device ) if you cannot find the button for installing that app, that means that your device is not supported by that application. Also if you visit that application page on Google play desktop site, and your device is listed in your account than a message will appear ...


3

The easiest way of running android and testing android application on x86 machines appears to be using the android virtual machine that comes with the latest SDK. With reference to a recent question, Huh? JDK not found? (on Windows 7 64-bit) , there may be a problem with the latest android sdk .exe installer. you can try to download the zip version of the ...


3

Internally Android uses so called API levels to distinguish between the various Android versions. An app records two (actually three, but this doesn't matter here) API levels within it's manifest: minSdkVersion targetSdkVersion These levels can differ when, for example, the App uses a feature of a higher API level only optionally. E.g. the access to the ...


2

Yes. Unfortunately the Market appears to pull the version of Android directly from the system somehow, so I'm not sure how to get around apps that are limited by version. However you can get around apps being limited to specific devices by editing your build.prop file. See my answer here: Modify phone model in build.prop to purchase unsupported apps ...


2

Sim-locked phones need to be unlocked for use on other carriers. Almost every phone you get will be sim-locked. The most easily unlocked phones I know of are the Galaxy S line. The only other thing you need to check is the radio frequency bands used by the device and the carrier. If they match, you're in luck. "Quad-band" devices should work on every ...


2

As the other answers already state, requirements are stored in the .apk's Manifest. There are several tools available to help you analyze this file, as e.g. is described at StackOverflow's question How to view AndroidManifest .xml from APK file?. Examples given in the answers include: android-apktool aapt (as also explained by Dianne Hackborn) Then there ...


2

The simple answer: You cannot. The expanded answer: You cannot, unless the Developer has specified this on their site. You could also email them to ask them. The developer uses the manifest file of their app to specify certain hardware or software version requirements for their app - Google Play then uses this info so that it doesn't install an app on an ...


2

You can try Market Helper; requires ROOT. Market Helper is a tool for Android that helps users to be able to change/fake their rooted devices to any other devices. For example, it can turn your Nexus 7 into Samsung Galaxy S3 in a few seconds. No reboot is required.


2

Let him try installing it via Playstore. If it's "incompatible by design" (e.g. requires Android 4.x while he has only 2.3), Playstore would refuse to install it and give the hint "not compatible with your device". Apart from that (and if the app description doesn't give a clue): check the comments for hints (take care for their date, compared with the ...


1

There are a few different things on Android that specify whether or not an app is compatible with a device: The author can specify minimum and maximum supported versions. Meaning that even though 2.2 is supported, 4.0 may not be. (Probably not this in your case). Reference Apps may require certain features to be available, another thing that the author ...


1

You can compare that to other OS's versions as well: A program designed for e.g. Windows 8 does not necessarily run on Windows 95. Development goes on, and that includes the APIs they provide. With each new version, new interfaces are available to the programmers, saving them from "re-inventing the wheel": Why code an entire library yourself, when it's much ...


1

If you're just looking to install apps from Google Play, you can download the apks directly using APK Downloader; all you'll need is the package name or Google Play URL. Then just move the files to your device and install normally. As a One V owner as well, I recommend looking into RhythmicRom. Google Play correctly detects my device as Android 4.2.2 and ...


1

Yes, it will be compatible. Google has already mentioned that it will be compatible with over 200 networks worldwide. That includes Airtel India as well. I have bunch of friends who are using Galaxy Nexus in India. Voice calls and 3G/2G works smoothly. The same should be true about Nexus 4 as it is also an unlocked device like the Galaxy Nexus.


1

The "Not compatible with this device" message encompasses more than just the OS version. The Play Store also checks for other software and hardware components that the app's developer listed as requirements. These components can range from a minimum screen resolution, to having particular hardware (e.g. Tegra 3 chipset). You can try searching for a given ...


1

Ok, this is not exactly what I was looking for, but it works... it is more like a preventive approach. So, my solution would was to install Titanium Backup (which requires root access to work) and backup all my apps. Then, whenever I need more space, I just backup my apps before I go on. If I need them again, I can use Titanium Backup and restore. And this ...



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