Hot answers tagged

17

You google apps will work exactly the same as before; either they'll be prepackaged with CM or you will download an update pack that will install them for you. Battery/radio/GPS issues are mostly related to specific hardware. You'd have to check the CM forums and wiki for your phone model to answer that one. Compatibility is an issue for some apps, but in ...


17

Minecraft Pocket Edition is available in the Google Play Store and Amazon's Appstore. Engadget has a hands-on of the game, and "SonyEricssonDev" has a video showing Minecraft being played on the Xperia Play.


16

The typical audio only jack has 3 rings, usually call Tip, Ring, Sleeve (TRS). These typically map to Left, Right, and Ground. Phone manufactures wanted to make this jack work with existing headphone so they used a connector with 4 rings, called Tip, Ring, Ring, Sleeve (TRRS). These map to Left, Right, and Ground just like the 3 ring, but the final connector ...


12

I know nothing about Minecraft but I can't see how it would be possible without rewriting big chunks of it. Even if you can convert the JAR to an .apk, there are many Java classes that are not part of the Android API. Furthermore, Android does not include AWT, Swing or Java 2D/3D, it has its own UI and graphics APIs, so the user interface would need to be ...


9

Android cannot just "run" native Java applications. Android does not have a Java Virtual Machine. Android uses a Dalvik Virtual Machine, which is completely different. While android applications are written in Java, it is a "subset" of actual Java. so even if you could run the jar files through a "converter", there is no guarantee the code is actually ...


9

The theory is that you should not need to know. When the developer publishes an app there is a manifest.xml file that describes the required capabilities. These can be both hardware and firmware related. e.g. you need a minimum Android version or you need a specific hardware feature like GPS. Google Play then automatically filters which apps you can see ...


9

When developers make apps, they have to specify any hardware/software requirements in a file called the androidmanifest.xml file. These can be hardware or software requirements, such as if the app needs GPS, or telephony features - or if it will only work on a certain Android version. When you use Google Play, it sends your device's 'features' to the ...


8

In general, NO. Some apps: run on specific devices only (i.e. not compatible with S4) run on specific Android versions available only in specific countries available only on specific carriers requires root access. (i.e. if phone is not rooted, it won't work)


7

Android Wear - Developed by Google Inc., an official adaptation of the pre-existing Android ecosystem for wearable devices. Pros : Developed by the same company that owns and contributes to Android, therefore underlying compatibility and the promise of future updates. More apps, due to the Google Play app store. Deeper linkage with the Android ...


6

There is no particular phone that's ideal, given the app devs can choose to support whatever subset of devices they wish. The Nexus devices are probably the most likely to be broadly compatible though. You can't brick with build.prop as far as I know, though you can certainly prevent your phone from booting if you change the wrong setting. Make a backup ...


6

It could mean that your phone does not meet either software or hardware requirements, or both. You could probably spoof the identity of your phone (so that it could be recognized as Samsung Galaxy S4 for example, instead of HTC Salsa), but you can't expect the app to work properly in this case. So, I would suggest to get an updated / higher-end phone ...


6

Yes, a "regular" set of headphones will work just fine, in much the same way that a single-channel earphone works in a stereo headphone jack. The other bits are for the microphone and the controls, but since your headphones won't have those it won't matter. I have had occasion to use 1st generation iPod earbuds as well as some generic earbuds in my Galaxy ...


6

It depends. If an application uses features present in Android 2.3, then it will not work on 2.2 or lower. If it only uses features present in older versions, then it will work on those older versions. For example, an app written for 2.1 (i.e., an app that only uses features from 2.1 or lower) will work on 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.0, and 3.1 (and any future ...


5

Yes, Android is fully backwards-compatible. App makers can choose to have their apps limited to certain versions, though, but most don't.


4

I haven't seen any Android system supporting NTFS out-of-the-box. Could be some CustomROMs do, or there are some "root mods". So without root, it might get hard (though there might be some UserSpace mods as well, technically spoken). If your device is rooted, you could take a look at NTFS Mounter, which might or might not support your Huawai (take care to ...


4

You need to find a WiFi dongle with a chipset the device supports. Each chipset requires different drivers, so you'll have to find one that's supported. There a discussion thread on the site you linked to about exactly this.


4

Google Play lets app developers restrict which devices their apps can be installed on. Developers target specific device characteristics (screen size, keyboard configuration, software version, hardware specs, geographic location, carrier, etc) by specifying them in the app's manifest. Google Play then filters which users can install the app given their ...


4

According to "Diana FromGameloft" on the Gameloft forums: You and your friends have to play the same version of the game on the same platform/device in order to see each other. Also "Gameloft_Ryan" posted on Windows Phone Central forums to say: You can only play cross-platform multiplayer with W8 and WP8 users. There isn't cross-platform for ...


4

Depends on the store you're using, and how safe it is. See e.g. our alternative-markets tag-wiki, questions using that tag, and especially How safe is it to use Aptoide? I've made pretty good experiences with F-Droid, and also with Aptoide (sticking to their main repository named "Apps", which is curated manually and well maintained – see the link in ...


4

Like Izzy said, the security of the app store is very important. In addition, make sure not to download the same app, or an app with the same package name on two different markets, it might create a conflict and produce a few errors, possibly a signature mismatch but it may vary by market. If the creators of the market are smart, they would prevent the error ...


3

No there are not all compatible. When you watching an application on Google play ( from your device ) if you cannot find the button for installing that app, that means that your device is not supported by that application. Also if you visit that application page on Google play desktop site, and your device is listed in your account than a message will appear ...


3

Application developers can set their own requirements in the play store for what must be present before a game or application will be available. For example, it is possible to require a device has a camera, or has a screen larger than a given size, or has support for a particular version of OpenGL. The HTC Salsa is equipped with an ARMv6 CPU (MSM7227), ...


3

Internally Android uses so called API levels to distinguish between the various Android versions. An app records two (actually three, but this doesn't matter here) API levels within it's manifest: minSdkVersion targetSdkVersion These levels can differ when, for example, the App uses a feature of a higher API level only optionally. E.g. the access to the ...


3

You can try Market Helper; requires ROOT. Market Helper is a tool for Android that helps users to be able to change/fake their rooted devices to any other devices. For example, it can turn your Nexus 7 into Samsung Galaxy S3 in a few seconds. No reboot is required.


2

Yes. Unfortunately the Market appears to pull the version of Android directly from the system somehow, so I'm not sure how to get around apps that are limited by version. However you can get around apps being limited to specific devices by editing your build.prop file. See my answer here: Modify phone model in build.prop to purchase unsupported apps ...


2

Sim-locked phones need to be unlocked for use on other carriers. Almost every phone you get will be sim-locked. The most easily unlocked phones I know of are the Galaxy S line. The only other thing you need to check is the radio frequency bands used by the device and the carrier. If they match, you're in luck. "Quad-band" devices should work on every ...


2

You should contact GameLoft. They officially support the Acer Liquid for that game, and thus should be able to help you (or at least take a bug report). They don't specify which versions of the Liquid they support, so it could just be that they haven't tested on the Metal.


2

As the other answers already state, requirements are stored in the .apk's Manifest. There are several tools available to help you analyze this file, as e.g. is described at StackOverflow's question How to view AndroidManifest .xml from APK file?. Examples given in the answers include: android-apktool aapt (as also explained by Dianne Hackborn) Then there ...


2

The simple answer: You cannot. The expanded answer: You cannot, unless the Developer has specified this on their site. You could also email them to ask them. The developer uses the manifest file of their app to specify certain hardware or software version requirements for their app - Google Play then uses this info so that it doesn't install an app on an ...


2

Let him try installing it via Playstore. If it's "incompatible by design" (e.g. requires Android 4.x while he has only 2.3), Playstore would refuse to install it and give the hint "not compatible with your device". Apart from that (and if the app description doesn't give a clue): check the comments for hints (take care for their date, compared with the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible