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57

It has to do with whether or not you've currently got a good connection to Google's servers for sync services and the like. From page 27 of their Android 2.3 Users Guide: Network status icons turn green if you have a Google Account added to your phone and the phone is connected to Google services, for syncing your Gmail, Calendar events, contacts, ...


20

The project mentioned by BobFlemming is the Serval project, and they are also on twitter. The android application will be available soon apparently. Thought I'd mention because not entirely straightforward to find it through the youtube link and that the twitter account isn't advertised on the site. Also I cannot +1 or comment yet so adding it as a reply.


17

Here is what I use that do not need an internet connection: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.androidintercom https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.remaller.android.wifitalkie_lite


12

Its been tested by a group here: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2011/01/researchers-enable-mesh-wifi-networking-for-android-smartphones.ars So it is possible.


11

YES. You will use it as a regular phone, but will be disconnected from the networks (Facebook, Twitter, IMs, Sync, etc) YES. You can access your calendar offline. And yes, you can sync when Wi-Fi is available. Yes, you just disable data traffic.


11

It could be done technically. AFAIK all communication between MMS enabled components is done via standard TCP/IP. But in a regular provider setup the MMS store and forward server(s) (MMSC) are only reachable via the providers network. That's why you can not send and receive MMS via WiFi. It's also the reason why you can not make a call and send/receive an ...


10

As you are rooted, you can use DroidWall to control network access on a per app basis. From the Market page: Front-end application for the iptables Linux firewall. Allows you to restrict which apps can access the network. This is the perfect solution if you don't have an unlimited data plan, or just wants to see your battery lasting longer.


9

Just kill the APN Connection settings. Somewhere under settings. And there is actually a switch for mobile internet. Disable that as well. Worked like a charm for me. If you can't find it, add the Power Savings widget to your home screen, it has that option


9

You are (not) in trouble. Or at least you cannot tell anymore by simply taking a look at the notification bar. With Android 4.4 (KitKat) came a few design changes; one of them was to turn those notification icons permanently gray, officially to be "less distracting". So how can you tell if there are issues with your connection to the Google servers? ...


8

You can pretty easily disable cellular data on an android device without root. On Android 2.2 and above, you can go to home --> menu --> Settings --> Wireless & networks --> Mobile networks --> and then uncheck Data enabled (on phones with Motoblur, the Data enabled setting might be in home --> menu --> Settings --> Data manager --> Data Delivery ...


8

I already posted this in another answer. As it where different details that time (more a general "what consumes most"), here some details from a reference Motorola Droid. Data taken from a German article named Energiesparplan (Heise is a very famous technology publisher in Germany; Google Translate Version here): ┌────────────┬──────────┬────────────┬───────...


8

Of course not. Your WiFi will go through your WiFi chip to AP and to some other ISP. There is no connection with 3G just like you can use WiFi even without SIM. But your carrier can(though highly unlikely) use some tracking program to track you and find what you are doing. Even if they do, the WiFi usage won't be counted as 3G. One advice I'd like to give ...


8

You can give a try to an app developed by a XDA Developers Forum user gyagapen that essentialy the app intelligently manages switching between both your WiFi and 3G data connections as you move about: CleverConnectivity CleverConnectivity is an application that helps you to manage your data and wifi connection in order to save battery. How does ...


8

No. You don't need a data connection plan to use OnePlus One or any android phone for that matter. Calling and texting will work irrespective of internet connection. However, having a data connection will be useful if you want to use some apps on the go.


7

The previously mentioned serval project now has an android app available - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.servalproject


7

Not quite answering your question, but switching off Background Data usage should stop chatty apps from doing anything in the background, and restrict it to just apps you launch and use, rather than apps that are syncing and checking for status updates all the time. If you add the Power Control Bar (built into Android since 1.6) to your home screen it's ...


7

I dont think it's possible, since the data is sent through the cell network and not through a traditional Wi-Fi style Internet connection.


7

Short answer: yes. It depends on the currently enabled Wi-Fi sleep mode. By default, Android disables Wi-Fi when your device goes into a sleep. In this case, 3G is the remaining mode of network communication, and it gets used by Gmail/Gtalk push notifications, etc. Obviously, this network communication takes its toll on your battery time. If you disable 3G ...


7

To my knowledge, it's the approach: Root based firewalls use IPFilter / iptables to control the flow. This automatically applies to all apps, whether there's a network connection available at all or not, whether the routing is working completely or not at all, or whether you're in a "closed environment" (Intranet) without access to the "outer world" (...


6

Depends entirely on how many contacts you have, how often they change, how often you set it to sync, etc. Paying for data as you go is generally a bad idea with an Android phone, they use a lot. You should be able to shut off 3G though (probably dependent on the phone) and just use WiFi. Although, it might be more difficult to prevent it from using 2G ...


6

A little bit yes. (See comments below) The app will make this seamless but should still use a bit of data. Edit: After checking Google Help I found this: By calling your own Google number When you call your own Google number and sign into the Google voicemail system, you’ll have the option to place a call. Just press 2 and enter the number. ...


6

If you have Android ICS, you can set the "Restrict background data" setting for each app. Go to Settings > Data usage, select the Mobile tab, then scroll down and select the app that you want to restrict. You can set the option at the bottom of the page that appears. If an app is built properly, setting this option will disallow the widgets and ...


6

Not sure if this question is on-topic on Android Enthusiasts. But I work with XMPP and Android, so here is my answer: As Lie Ryan already stated, a handover from one mobile cell to another is almost always transparent to the TCP stack on Android devices. But there are situations where the IP of your Android device will change. This are typically GSM/UMTS &...


6

In short: GPS works without an active connection, it's completely passive. GPS has however an addon feature called A-GPS (assisted GPS) which speeds up the startup (time to first fix) considerably. It basically warms up the receiver with GPS status data such as time, coarse location and most of all GPS satellite orbit location data (ephemeris data download)....


6

Basic Concepts You are confusing two different concepts: "GPS" and "Navigation", that are used for two distinct scenarios on your device. GPS is used to pin-point your location in the globe. Navigation is used to plan and track your movements from point A to point B. While Navigation may depend on 3G or Wi-Fi to access the internet and retrieve maps and ...


6

I know of no way to restrict an app to the 3G network (as opposed to 2G/4G), but there are several solutions to restrict apps to either WiFi or mobile networks (or keep/allow them from/to both). Examples include DroidWall - Android Firewall1 (which you already mentioned, but which is discontinued), its successor AFWall+2, its fork Android Firewall3 (gone), ...


6

If your device is running at least Android 4.0, you can use Androids native data management: Data Usage configuration on Android 4.0+ (source: Droid-Life.com, click image to enlarge) Here you can setup an overall data volume (a requirement for the second step -- but one can set that rather high, like 4 GB): tick the Set mobile data limit checkbox, and ...


5

You probably need to use some sort of 3rd party program like Tasker, Locale or AutomateIt. These programs allow you to set triggers such as: starting an app screen on/off connected to Wi-fi location etc... and perform actions based on that, such as: toggle data toggle GPS run an app etc...


5

You could just check the logo on the top bar? On the right you have time, battery, signal and either g/3g/h or the wifi logo. this image (random googled) shows the tab with the wifi logo while this rather bad (also random google) image shows it with 3g


5

On my Galaxy S, you can hold the power button for a second and a menu will come up. Just hit "Data network mode" to deactivate it. You can reactivate it the same way. If you don't have that, you should be able to go to Settings -> Wireless and network -> Mobile networks and uncheck Data enabled or Use packet data or similar.



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