Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

According to Steve Kondik, this is essentially old code that is leftover from older versions of CyanogenMod: This was only here for apps that were statically linked against uclibc in old CM versions. It can likely just be removed. However, he also goes on to note: Also, this file is NOT written when connecting to a network as /system is readonly. ...


5

Everything I've seen suggests you can only do it if your phone is rooted. Here's a tutorial for those with rooted phones.


5

You can solve this issue either from the Android side or from the Windows side: From the Android side Tap your device "menu" button, and select "settings"; Tap "Wireless & networks"; Tap "Wi-Fi settings"; Tap your device "menu" to bring up extra options and select "advanced"; Tap "Use static IP"; Fill in your local network static IP details and dns ...


5

In Android, the DNS Cache is not on the OS level (Linux), but on the Java level (managed by java.net.InetAddress). Therefore, it is not possible to list the cache contents from the shell, however you can access it from the Java code. Please see Java DNS cache viewer question on StackOverflow, one of the answers has a sample Java code that prints the ...


5

While you're on Wifi, have a look in Wi-Fi settings > menu|Advanced. It looks like it's easier when you're on Wifi than when you're on a celular signal (3 or 2.5g).I've found a blog post here that seems to do what your asking, but you may need to have rooted the phone, or at least be comfotable with editing a few system bits and bobs.


5

On a typical Linux system the cache is cleared by running /etc/init.d/nscd restart, but at least my ROM doesn't use nscd to cache DNS. You can check if yours does, but I doubt it. I've seen suggestions that clearing the brower cache would clear DNS cache too, but one sure way is to do a hard reboot (shutdown, remove battery for 30s, reattach battery and ...


5

Addresses are cached for 600 seconds (10 minutes) by default. Failed lookups are cached for 10 seconds. From everything I've seen, there's nothing built in to flush the cache. This is apparently a reported bug in Android because of the way it stores DNS cache. Clearing the browser cache doesn't touch the DNS, the "hard reset" clears it because it simply ...


4

The only way to do this in Android is to do a hard reboot. The necessary command-line tools are not normally available, however in my tests a hard reboot has always done the trick for me (Galaxy Nexus, and HTC Desire, various ROMs). This is a pain, but it is quicker than the 10min cache timeout.


4

You could report the bug to the Android developers, or vote on an existing bug, if there already is one open. This one looks a bit like the issue you are talking about. Make sure you explain exactly what is happening, and how they can reproduce the issue.


4

This is really a continuation of @Zuul's answer, to cover the DNS settings in Android 4.0+ (ICS), which is a little harder to find IMO. AFAIK Zuul's answer covers Android <2.3 settings. From the Android side (Android 4.0+ ICS) Settings WiFi (click on word "WiFi", not ON/OFF switch) Press and hold (long tap) your wireless network until dialog pops up ...


3

In the March 2014 update to SSHelper the documentation states new changes to it's Zeroconf broadcasting name. In the documentation Configuration section of the details it describes the checkbox to "Enable Zeroconf broadcasting". When this is enabled any other client on the local network, will be able to browse and then connect for SSHelper on the network. ...


3

In my HTC Desire I find it under: Settings-> Wireless & networks -> WiFi Settings Press Menu and select Advanced Here I can see option to use static IP by selecting "Use static IP"


3

You can change the dns settings in Android, but you need to root your phone first: http://blog.varunkumar.me/2010/09/how-to-change-dns-server-on-android.html I don't believe there is a way to password protect the dns settings, but at least it wouldn't be obvious for them to figure out how to change the settings. Edit: Of course, one thing you can do to ...


3

I "solved" this problem by using an iptables rule to forward all port 53 connections to an intended DNS server; my experience on Android 4.4.2 with attempting to modify DNS settings while connected to 3G has been exactly as Leo described; ignorance of values in getprop |grep dns[0-9]\]: and dhcpd.conf. iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -p udp --dport 53 -j DNAT ...


3

Ok, first of all full disclosure: I'm the author of an app which is now on the Google Play Store and which makes you able to change DNS for any mobile connection on Android 4.4. The app requires root and is called Override DNS. I was told, on a now deleted answer, that is fair to link to my app as long as I expose it clearly. The problem I found with this ...


2

This is a known design problem when using statically linked libresolv and glibc. You have 2 options: Use Google Android's native libc Bionic library instead of glibc. Build busybox to search libraries in /system/lib (or make the necessary links e.g. /usr/lib -> /system/lib ). Place ld-linux.so.3, libc.so.6, libresolv.so.2, libnss_dns.so.2 in your ...


2

OK just found it. In wifi settings press and hold the connected network you want to set IP to. Pick modify network and in there you scroll down, to DHCP settings and pick static and scroll down to et your IP. Kinda complicated comparing to non sense android. O well. Hope that helps OP or any other fellow searcher.


2

There're also apps like Internet Booster promising to "clear DNS cache" (amongst other things). I didn't try it out myself, and furthermore there seems no way to do only that (just one "optimize" button which "applies improvements"); also its effects might differ between devices (says the app's description) -- but it might be better than a reboot. Btw: while ...


2

It took a lot of effort but I actually found a working solution to my problem. I first updated my phone to latest available Android version 2.3.6 and that did not solve my problem. So I installed an App that shows me more details about the network setup of my phone. And after some digging around I noticed what was wrong: My phone didn't have a default IPv4 ...


2

I have yet to find a way to create a hostname for an Android device. What I have done is that I set an IP reservation for my phone, so that every time I go to use SSH (I use QuickSSHd, but it should work for SSHelper) you can at least point to the same IP address. There is no way to set a host name for the phone, that I have found.


2

ICS has issues on some devices with Wireless-N. My Acer A500 works properly, but my 2 Xperia phones kill my router instantly if I use the N-draft protocol. So, try deactivating N-draft mode in your Android device or your router, then it sohuld work.


2

The very-originally-named Dynamic DNS Client is a fairly popular app for this purpose. As for service, noip is popular, free, and reliable in my experience.


2

I am leaving my old answer since the browse and parsing examples may still be useful for some people. Thanks to the developer's version 5.5 update to SSHelper, you can create a user defined name to be the phones Zeroconf instance name. SSHelper will run the SSH server on a non-rooted Android. 1. Update SSHelper to version 5.5 2. Open Android Bluetooth ...


1

Regardless whether you're connected to your local network via WiFi and DHCP is in use, Android always seems to override its DNS entries using Google's servers. It's somewhat hidden, but easy to change – provided you have your own DNS running (a lot of routers offer that already). To do so, go to your list of WiFi networks in Settings, long-press your WiFi's ...


1

I ended up manually changing my DNS server to tether Internet from my mobile phone. My phone uses a local DNS server from my mobile carrier which I was able to trace using CompruebaIP. Any other DNS server is blocked by my mobile carrier (Globe Telecom). I reckon that my phone's DNS service is not properly working. When tethering, the DNS provider should be ...


1

I have been using the free SSHelper (without rooting) since it recently added zeroConf broadcasting. It provides an SSH and RSYNC (file transfer) server, while also broadcasting a ZeroConf name. Another avahi/bonjour client can connect without needing to know the android hostname. Explained in more detail in this other answer: Set hostname for SSHelper


1

Do you have any control over the (presumably wireless) LAN that you're connecting your phone to? It seems to me that the main part of your problem is just that your phone picks up different IP addresses each time it connects to your LAN. If it always had the same IP, then you could either make a note of this, save it in your SSH client, or assign a name to ...


1

Currently there is no Avahi daemon on Android and open ticket #354 at Avahi tracker, where there are attached patches, needs to be addressed to make a build for Android possible. You can try to build it manually, if really needed.


1

You might want to take a look at the DNS Settings app, which claims to be able to do what you want (you just have to switch once to a static IP to change the DNS settings, and then switch back to dynamic IP, according to the description). That's the only non-root app I could find for this issue -- there are two more apps at least, but they require root to ...


1

I haven't tried this, but a quick look at Android's bionic libc sources seems to indicate that Android might use /etc/ppp/resolv.conf: (from http://code.metager.de/source/xref/android/4.1.1/bionic/libc/private/resolv_private.h#113) 92 /* 93 * Resolver configuration file. 94 * Normally not present, but may contain the address of the 95 * initial name ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible