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Yes As far as I know, a NANDroid backup makes an Image of the entire device. So, this can work because the entire file system is copied along with the file system. The device will still be encrypted after restoring. I might be wrong because I've never done this. But if you encrypt a flash drive with bitlocker, copy the contents of it including the ...


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Assuming that only the screen is broken, that your device thinks everything is ok and boots up and runs normally you might be able to remotely decrypt the card or access the data, but I think it's a long shot. First, the phone would have to be rooted. Then you would have to connect it to your computer and run a remote access program like Telnet or SSH. ...


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Same phone, same problem (except my phone is not rooted), but it eventually resolved itself. Posting the exact steps I followed in case it helps anyone else: On first reboot (when the problem first occurred), the phone said it was preparing the device and then after a few seconds it told me the card was safe to remove (but I had not asked to unmount it). ...


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In Linux, encrypting user data usually involves just using an encrypted partition/container for the user's /home directory. All user data is stored there so the user is reasonably safe. In Android, all user data is stored on the same partition, the /data partition. The user data for apps goes into /data/user/(userid), the emulated external storage into ...


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Afraid not. We're talking about "device encryption" here, which – as the name suggests – encrypts the "device" (in this context, the "storage device"). All users have their data on the same storage device – so either you encrypt it or not. While it's not possible to "encrypt a single user", there are possibilities to encrypt selected files and directories, ...



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