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1

Actually your missing the main point of encryption. Lets say all you have is a PIN on your phone. If I get a hold of your phone I can simply hook it up to my linux machine, or even pc, and get documents, pictures, see your logs from internet see what apps you have installed get your data from those apps and import them into a different phone install that ...


0

I was able to change the runtime on my encrypted Galaxy S5.


0

I think if you set up an additional unencrypted partition, or add an unencrypted sdcard (if your device has a slot - not my Nexus 7) and mount it up and copy over the update file before flashing, it will work.


1

I had a Xperia Z, with encrypted storage. But it gets factory reset automatically when i enter wrong pass key 5-6 times. Anyways, do you have any anti theft software installed. If yes they might be a help for you.


0

This is a very old question with no up-to-date answer. As of 2014, Android 4.x and later offer native full-disk encryption. Here's how to encrypt your phone along with pros and cons, and here's a discussion on the benefits of doing so against various types of attackers.


1

You can flash the factory ftf using flashtool. You can connect the phone in flashmode (Volume down) and flash the ftf. This is similar to factory reset. This method does not require USB debugging to be ON. You need flashtool to be installed in your machine. Install the flashmode and fastboot driver for your device. Open Flash tool Switch off your phone ...


0

If you weren't successfull just using google, have a look in the android open source project aosp. You will find openssl and the answer to your question. There is a nice page which allows for very fast searches inside aosp: http://androidxref.com/source/


1

The Xperia Z supports USB-on-the-go, so with a USB-OTG adaptor and a USB keyboard you should be able to enter the encryption passphrase to boot the device.


0

You can choose a password that exists of numbers only. I've done that with Jellybean, and was annoyed when starting up the phone, and not having the number pad. It worked with Jelly Bean, and I hope it works with KitKat as well. Only thing I would prefer is to have a password for startup, complex with letters and numbers, and a PIN for unlocking the phone. ...


4

Factory-resetting twice is pointless. The first factory reset will already wipe all user data: the second won't delete anything that wasn't already deleted by the first. Encrypting the device is also a waste of time, because you've already factory-reset the device. It might make some sense if you were the seller of the phone, and you wanted to overwrite the ...


1

Your question made me try to use the same configuration. Solution Generate your key pair in OpenSSH key file format, I used my linux workstation: ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "KEYNAME" (I left passphrase empty but I think it will work with it too, add the public key to your host: cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys (Assuming that's the ...


-1

Solution that will work 100% of the time, without deleting data, killing android processed, etc. According to the source of cryptfs.h (http://code.metager.de/source/xref/CyanogenMod/android/system/vold/cryptfs.h) it is necessary to have 16 Kb of empty space on you FS to perform encryption. Plus the 32 byte of padding and 16 bytes for the salt and however ...


3

Yes, it's possible to factory reset (wipe) the phone, and then it'll be like new. If you want to make sure the phone can't be used any more, you have to report the theft to the police and make sure to give them the IMEI of the phone. (It should be written on the box it came in, or possibly your carrier will know.) Then they will blacklist the IMEI so the ...


0

A less than ideal solution is disabling the lock screen altogether using an app such as NoLock.



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