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28

See here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4809874/how-to-access-the-sms-storage-on-android The gist is that SMS/MMS are residing in databases on the phone and the answer to the question contains the link to this tutorial. The location of the database might vary from phone to phone, but you can look it up with this command via adb (you need to be root to ...


28

There is no singularly defined "Android" filesystem, so this can vary between devices. Any FS that the kernel can load drivers for is basically fair game. By and large, you'll almost certainly find that ext4 is the most common filesystem on modern devices. Older devices may use older ext* versions as well, or other filesystems entirely. Since everything is ...


26

This is apparently a known bug in Android which is not even acknowledged by Google since Oct 2012 — depending on the method of creating files on the Android device, these files may remain invisible when accessing the device using MTP, until the device is rebooted. Known workarounds include: Use USB storage mode instead of MTP, if it is supported by the ...


26

All apps (root or not) have a default data directory, which is /data/data/<package_name>. By default, the apps databases, settings, and all other data go here. If an app expects huge amounts of data to be stored, or for other reasons wants to "be nice to internal storage", there's a corresponding directory on the SDCard ...


25

First, you need to be aware of two facts: Android uses more than one file system (think of "multiple drives/partitions" when comparing with your computer while sharing a common base, directory structures might differ between manufacturers So as starting points, I further recommend the file-system tag-wiki and the partition tag-wiki (you might also want ...


23

That has to do with the Multi-User feature enabled with JellyBean 4.2 (not 4.1). In order to handle separate accounts, parts of the directory structure had to be changed. /sdcard/legacy e.g. always points to the currently logged-in user's sd card directory. I currently cannot find the document where I read the details, so I cannot link any source. But with ...


19

Don't think about Android as a heavily modified Linux distribution. Because it's not. The nearly only thing that Android shares with a Linux distribution is the kernel. And even this component is modified. Also other core components, like the libc, differ. Android has no /etc/fstab You don't need /etc/fstab to mount an partition. But there is IIRC no mount ...


18

That should be /sdcard/Downloads, replace /sdcard with wherever your "data storage" is. You can also access them using the App "Downloads".


13

You can fix this with the help of root and a terminal emulator (e.g. Android Terminal Emulator (or, alternatively, using adb shell). The binary to do the job is called fsck, and usually located in either /system/xbin or /system/bin. Sometimes you need a special variant of it, which might e.g. be called fsck.exfat or the like. So first let's make sure we find ...


12

Use a file manager to look in the following locations: /data/app /data/app-private /system/app/ /sdcard/.android_secure (shows .asec files, not .apks) On Samsung phones: /sdcard/external_sd/.android_secure You need to be rooted to view the first three.


12

Go to settings > apps > all applications > media storage > tap 'clear data' ... Reboot and everything will appear in Windows Explorer once again.


12

/data/user was added in Jelly Bean as part of multi-user support. Each user on the device gets a directory in there named after their user ID, and that directory contains each app's data directory for that user. /data/user/0 is a symlink to /data/data.


11

I'm tempted to say everything is safe to delete. It should be, with a storage device intended to be removed and used elsewhere. But I know some apps will be unhappy. So a good rule is not to delete anything that's clearly used by an app that you care about. It's probably a good idea not to delete level 0 directories that start with a . such as ...


11

The syntax of mount command usually requires you specify the target: mount -o remount,rw /system /system This output could be useful for us to better understand your problem: cat /proc/mounts As a last resort, as you have root you can try saving raw image of system, mount it on your box and push the app there, then flash it back on your device. To save ...


11

The solution was to reboot the phone. The com.fsck.k9 directory is now visible on the top level of the phones file system.


10

Short Answer: Yes More Detailed Answer: The file size limit is not something specific to Android, it is a limit of the File System. It may "technically" be a bug in Android though, as FAT32, which is what the file system is for the sdcard, should have a file size limit of 4GB ((2^32)-1 = 4,294,967,295B) but it looks like the filesystem on Android is ...


10

Unless you've done something unusual with your device, the SD card will be formatted as a FAT file system, which does not support *nix file permissions. This Linux FAQ entry from one of MIT's professors explains it a bit, and also explains how you can potentially use mount options to change the permission mode of the device (this would require root, though, ...


10

The Android system does not have the conventional /etc/passwd storage for users and groups. In android, user and groups are used to isolate processes and grant permissions. The Android system creates a user per application when an application gets installed. Hence application data files are stored in /data/data/<app-name>/, and are read-writable only ...


9

Here's a helpful piece of info also. This is the absolute path to SMS and MMS DB on most android devices: /data/data/com.android.providers/telephony/databases/mmssms.db


8

I usually use a combination of the following 4 commands and correlate them, since each of these commands gives a piece of the information that might be needed. Summarily: Using df lists the filesystem path alias and size info as seen below (total size, used, free and block size) Example output: root@ks01lte:/sdcard # df df Filesystem ...


8

That is unfortunately not so easy. Since there is not API for the secure deletion of files, it would require root for the "secure delete app" in order to achieve block level access to the storage device. Only access to the blocks of the deleted file eventually allows an app to overwrite the leftovers of the file with random data. Eventually, because the ...


8

Framework-res.apk basically contains the elements of the Graphical User Interface for the phone. This file is available at /system/framework/framework-res.apk. Poking in this file would mean changing the complete look and feel of your device. Since it is the main element of your screen, replacing it directly by pushing it through ADB would lead to ...


8

After a lot of trial and error, I discovered that the Android/obb folder is automatically shared among users. It's not ideal, but it's better than a cloud storage option for large files.


8

LOST.DIR is just a storage space (directory) for files that were recovered upon boot. You can safetly remove it with no problems. The sysytem keeps it just in case you want to get your recovered currupted files back. A quick google search yielded: LOST.DIR - what is it? As for preventing it from being created, just prevent the SD card from becoming ...


8

I installed the Disk Info app and in the options, I enabled Expert mode and Unmounted partitions. It doesn't say "swap", but it shows clearly that it's the only other partition on the SD card and it's the right size, so /dev/block/mmcblk1p2 must be the one: Swapper 2 is configured to use /dev/block/mmcblk0p3 by default, so I'm glad I didn't go with the ...


7

Note that, as of Kitkat (Android 4.4, released Sept 2013), the default path changed from: /data/data/com.android.providers/telephony/databases/mmssms.db to /data/data/com.android.providers.telephony/databases/mmssms.db Update: As mentioned in the comments, the latter path already exists in JB.


7

Over Wi-Fi Install a small app SwiFTP FTP Server. (original link 'dead' - 2012-09-22, see 'http://ppareit.github.com/swiftp/' instead ) Just, setup username & password. After tapping Start button, your device will become FTP server & the app will give you URL (handy if you don't know device IP & FTP URL format). On PC, you can use any FTP client ...


7

There's a big chapter on that in Andrew Hoog's Android Forensics book on that (see this Amazon list for available copies). Unfortunately, that book doesn't come for free (but from Elsevier; so prices range from ~USD 20 for the Kindle edition to ~USD 50 for the print, with some crazy offers for ~USD 170+ as well), but it explains a lot of background not only ...


7

Sockets and pipes represent Unix' way of inter process communication, and a communication channel has no point in having a size. Sockets are thus not seekable as in go to position x in the file. Linux (which Android makes use of) has 7 file types: Regular Files Directories Character  Device Files Block Device Files Local Domain Sockets Named Pipes ...


7

There are perfectly good reasons why those informations are readable, and that's nothing dangerous (writing, however, would be). This is inherited from the Linux system Android builds upon -- and I will give you a few short examples to show you the good of it: If you list contents of the /proc (virtual) directory, you will find things like e.g.: ...



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