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19

See here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4809874/how-to-access-the-sms-storage-on-android The gist is that SMS/MMS are residing in databases on the phone and the answer to the question contains the link to this tutorial. The location of the database might vary from phone to phone, but you can look it up with this command via adb (you need to be root to ...


18

That has to do with the Multi-User feature enabled with JellyBean 4.2 (not 4.1). In order to handle separate accounts, parts of the directory structure had to be changed. /sdcard/legacy e.g. always points to the currently logged-in user's sd card directory. I currently cannot find the document where I read the details, so I cannot link any source. But with ...


17

Don't think about Android as a heavily modified Linux distribution. Because it's not. The nearly only thing that Android shares with a Linux distribution is the kernel. And even this component is modified. Also other core components, like the libc, differ. Android has no /etc/fstab You don't need /etc/fstab to mount an partition. But there is IIRC no mount ...


13

That should be /sdcard/Downloads, replace /sdcard with wherever your "data storage" is. You can also access them using the App "Downloads".


10

Short Answer: Yes More Detailed Answer: The file size limit is not something specific to Android, it is a limit of the File System. It may "technically" be a bug in Android though, as FAT32, which is what the file system is for the sdcard, should have a file size limit of 4GB ((2^32)-1 = 4,294,967,295B) but it looks like the filesystem on Android is ...


9

I'm tempted to say everything is safe to delete. It should be, with a storage device intended to be removed and used elsewhere. But I know some apps will be unhappy. So a good rule is not to delete anything that's clearly used by an app that you care about. It's probably a good idea not to delete level 0 directories that start with a . such as ...


8

Use a file manager to look in the following locations: /data/app /data/app-private /system/app/ /sdcard/.android_secure (shows .asec files, not .apks) On Samsung phones: /sdcard/external_sd/.android_secure You need to be rooted to view the first three.


8

/data/user was added in Jelly Bean as part of multi-user support. Each user on the device gets a directory in there named after their user ID, and that directory contains each app's data directory for that user. /data/user/0 is a symlink to /data/data.


7

That is unfortunately not so easy. Since there is not API for the secure deletion of files, it would require root for the "secure delete app" in order to achieve block level access to the storage device. Only access to the blocks of the deleted file eventually allows an app to overwrite the leftovers of the file with random data. Eventually, because the ...


7

Unless you've done something unusual with your device, the SD card will be formatted as a FAT file system, which does not support *nix file permissions. This Linux FAQ entry from one of MIT's professors explains it a bit, and also explains how you can potentially use mount options to change the permission mode of the device (this would require root, though, ...


7

There's a big chapter on that in Andrew Hoog's Android Forensics book on that (see this Amazon list for available copies). Unfortunately, that book doesn't come for free (but from Elsevier; so prices range from ~USD 20 for the Kindle edition to ~USD 50 for the print, with some crazy offers for ~USD 170+ as well), but it explains a lot of background not only ...


7

Sockets and pipes represent Unix' way of inter process communication, and a communication channel has no point in having a size. Sockets are thus not seekable as in go to position x in the file. Linux (which Android makes use of) has 7 file types: Regular Files Directories Character  Device Files Block Device Files Local Domain Sockets Named Pipes ...


7

There are perfectly good reasons why those informations are readable, and that's nothing dangerous (writing, however, would be). This is inherited from the Linux system Android builds upon -- and I will give you a few short examples to show you the good of it: If you list contents of the /proc (virtual) directory, you will find things like e.g.: ...


7

You can fix this with the help of root and a terminal emulator (e.g. Android Terminal Emulator (or, alternatively, using adb shell). The binary to do the job is called fsck, and usually located in either /system/xbin or /system/bin. Sometimes you need a special variant of it, which might e.g. be called fsck.exfat or the like. So first let's make sure we find ...


7

First, you need to be aware of two facts: Android uses more than one file system (think of "multiple drives/partitions" when comparing with your computer while sharing a common base, directory structures might differ between manufacturers So as starting points, I further recommend the file-system tag-wiki and the partition tag-wiki (you might also want ...


7

The filesystem support is device-specific, and in fact many devices using Android 2.3 support ext3 in the kernel (or ext4, which can also mount ext3 and ext2 filesystems). Usually the difference in filesystem support is due to different hardware. Older devices often used raw NAND flash chips and MTD drivers in Linux, which did not support conventional ...


6

Try this: adb shell "cd /data/local && mkdir tmp" adb shell mv /data/local/tmp /data/local/tmp.bak adb shell ln -s /data /data/local/tmp adb reboot adb wait-for-device adb shell rm /data/local.prop adb shell "echo \"ro.kernel.qemu=1\" > /data/local.prop" adb reboot By creating a link to from /data to /data/local/tmp, ...


6

This is apparently a known bug in Android which is not even acknowledged by Google since Oct 2012 — depending on the method of creating files on the Android device, these files may remain invisible when accessing the device using MTP, until the device is rebooted. Known workarounds include: Use USB storage mode instead of MTP, if it is supported by the ...


6

FolderSync could come in handy here. Define a "folder pair" (i.e. which directory on your Android device to sync with which directory on your computer), using any of the available protocols (SFTP, Samba, or any other). Then either chose for some "auto-check" (e.g. have it synced every night), or push the button manually. Using the paid version, you could ...


5

You can't directly mount the internal storage. You need to be rooted to view it on your phone, or you can use adb pull from the Android SDK Tools to copy it off the device.


5

ASTRO File Manager by Metago available from Google Play Store has an SMB plugin (ASTRO SMB Module) that serves your needs.


5

Here's a helpful piece of info also. This is the absolute path to SMS and MMS DB on most android devices: /data/data/com.android.providers/telephony/databases/mmssms.db


5

Over Wi-Fi Install a small app SwiFTP FTP Server. (original link 'dead' - 2012-09-22, see 'http://ppareit.github.com/swiftp/' instead ) Just, setup username & password. After tapping Start button, your device will become FTP server & the app will give you URL (handy if you don't know device IP & FTP URL format). On PC, you can use any FTP client ...


5

Framework-res.apk basically contains the elements of the Graphical User Interface for the phone. This file is available at /system/framework/framework-res.apk. Poking in this file would mean changing the complete look and feel of your device. Since it is the main element of your screen, replacing it directly by pushing it through ADB would lead to ...


5

Most video recording apps are IMHO limited to 1h non-stop recording, as you can find with a simple Google search, which is probably a safety measure to not let you run out of battery -- as video recording is the biggest consumer (see What can I do to increase battery life on my Android device?). However, a developer can have his app overriding this limit ...


5

Try formatting your SDCard as either Ext4Fs or Ext3Fs. Using such a tool as Partition Magic or even Parted To quote from Wikipedia's entry on Ext4fs: Large file system The ext4 filesystem can support volumes with sizes up to 1 exbibyte (EiB) and files with sizes up to 16 tebibytes (TiB). Likewise, for the quote on Wikipedia's entry on Ext3fs ...


5

I installed the Disk Info app and in the options, I enabled Expert mode and Unmounted partitions. It doesn't say "swap", but it shows clearly that it's the only other partition on the SD card and it's the right size, so /dev/block/mmcblk1p2 must be the one: Swapper 2 is configured to use /dev/block/mmcblk0p3 by default, so I'm glad I didn't go with the ...


5

It's even riskier than cybersam says. You shouldn't check/repair a mounted filesystem (i.e. when it is in use), on any operating system, because programs might be using the files while you're checking them and possibly making changes. This could cause the checker to think there are errors where there are really no errors; it might cause unexpected behaviour ...


4

The Galaxy Tab is pretty much like any other android device. You can transfer images to it, but not directly from, say, your Camera. It does not have USB ports on it for external devices, like thumb drives. Connecting to a NAS, out of the box, also really isn't possible. The device does not support mounting NAS (NFS & CIFS) out of the box. You could ...


4

.Trash-1000 is a metafolder like Windows's Recycle Bin, normally created by Ubuntu (and perhaps other Linux variants). Have you deleted anything on your SD card from your PC? That would explain it. You can safely delete it. See also: http://superuser.com/questions/169980/what-is-trash-and-trash-1000



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