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22

There is no singularly defined "Android" filesystem, so this can vary between devices. Any FS that the kernel can load drivers for is basically fair game. By and large, you'll almost certainly find that ext4 is the most common filesystem on modern devices. Older devices may use older ext* versions as well, or other filesystems entirely. Since everything is ...


6

FolderSync could come in handy here. Define a "folder pair" (i.e. which directory on your Android device to sync with which directory on your computer), using any of the available protocols (SFTP, Samba, or any other). Then either chose for some "auto-check" (e.g. have it synced every night), or push the button manually. Using the paid version, you could ...


5

It's even riskier than cybersam says. You shouldn't check/repair a mounted filesystem (i.e. when it is in use), on any operating system, because programs might be using the files while you're checking them and possibly making changes. This could cause the checker to think there are errors where there are really no errors; it might cause unexpected behaviour ...


4

The solution was to reboot the phone. The com.fsck.k9 directory is now visible on the top level of the phones file system.


4

1) On which physical storage does "Memory" sit When the specs say "Memory", it's referring to the RAM that the device has. This is not persistent storage, it is "volatile" storage, which loses its information when unpowered (after a brief discharge time). RAM is memory the system and apps use to function, for things like storing the state of an ...


3

One way you can achieve this is using an app - rSync and use a Tasker job to periodically (or conditionally) upload/download data from your phone. You can refer to rSync's documentation for its configuration and other setup steps. You can configure it to only specify required one way transfer of files.


3

It might be that this option will try to repair any filesystem issues that it finds. If a repair attempt does not do the right thing, or is prevented from completion (say, the battery dies), you could end up with unusable files; or, if the repair attempt failed in the system partition, you could end up with a dead device (but you might be able to recover ...


3

Most devices have the system partition mounted as read-only. You need to remount the partition with write access so that you can modify the files. This free app should work. Other utilities such as ES File Explorer and Titanium Backup also have the ability to remount the system partition as writeable. Alternatively, you can use a Terminal Emulator or ADB ...


3

If you are logged into your Google account, your Phrasebook will synchronize across devices and you can also access it from the web interface of Google Translate. Furthermore, after importing to Anki you can synchronize your decks across devices. In the web interface of Google Translate, show the Phrasebook by clicking the Phrasebook icon in the upper ...


3

As you may already know, you can only access those files with root, i.e. if your device is rooted. I can copy and paste the file to another location, but I think this may change the nature of the file. Whut? No, copying a file will not change the file contents. They will be the same as of the time the copy process is started. Ideally, you should make ...


3

YAFFS (Yet Another Flash File System) is generally used as the default file system for Android devices. http://www.yaffs.net/google-android


2

I'm not sure if it will work with your particular phone's charger, but often with cables that transfer both power and data, there are separate cords inside the cable for power, and data. I'm not especially interested in tearing up my phone charger to confirm my idea, but you could try stripping part of the cable, identifying and cutting the power cords ...


2

Prior to ICS, Android used /system/mnt/sdcard as the point for mount. Some versions by manufacturers used /system/sdcard instead. ICS, thereafter, changed it, but kept existing mount point for backwards compatibility with legacy apps. Now, /system/storage/sdcard0 or /system/storage/sdcard1, particularly, JB on tablets, is used to accomodate multiple ...


2

Because of how Android has evolved over the years many newer devices have the same files mounted (usually with a bind mount) in multiple places. Others are symbolic links. It's really too bad that the file manager app isn't showing you these details :-/


2

I don't know about "legacy" or "0", but /sdcard is a symbolic link to the sdcard device folder. At the terminal, run "ls -l". Add the end of some lines, you will see: sdcard -> /mnt/sdcard etc -> /system/etc and maybe others depending on your setup. This is standard Linux setup, and makes both places link the same place - so there is no ...


2

There's no direct equivalent in Android. Each app has its own directory in /data/data (for a multi-user system, it's /data/users/n). Apps are encouraged to show a metadata-based view of user data, instead of requiring the user to worry about individual files. Each app stores the files and databases that hold its documents, and its configuration files, in its ...


2


2

I use "ES File Explorer" as a file explorer on my device. This allows the creation of file shortcuts. Once installed, just choose the homepage you want the shortcut, press and hold on the homescreen and you should be prompted to add a widget / app / shortcut. In shortcuts, choose "Es File Explorer" and it then lets you choose the file you want a shortcut ...


2

I thought that root was required to do this. That's not quite right. Any user can see that directory, but only root can write to it. Directories lower down the hierarchy such as /data/data are not world-readable, so while you'll be able to see that that directory exists, you won't be able to see its contents on an unrooted device. Some file managers ...


2

Use ES File Explorer.. Select menu-> Switch on Root Explorer under Tools. Again click on Root Explorer. A pop up window will appear. Select Mount R/W -> Select RW option from the new popup for '/' and 'system'. Now onto your operation. You will now be able to move the files without failure.


2

"In the case of devices without true external storage, it's still necessary for Android to provide an emulated external storage in order to remain compatible with older apps. In other words the RAM is physically internal (non-removable) but a section of it is partitioned and the Android file-system APIs treat that partition as being "external" and ...


2

Fat32 in Android usually only applies to the External SD card, no longer supported by Google. AFAIK it was a fairly generic implementation as it was only for the card. Since most of the newer devices use eMMC,the file system android uses is ext4 except for firmware, which is vFat. Example below is from a Galaxy S4 /system ext4 /data ext4 /cache ext4 ...


2

This is mostly speculation, but mediaserver is probably what is used to play all and any sound on android. Some app was probably using mediaserver inappropriately, causing it to show as using excessive battery. logcat2 is probably the process used for logging output, and is where many debug and error messages are sent to. Outright deleting them probably ...


2

It sounds like your filesystem is being corrupted by whatever else you're using to write to it with the external card reader. Probably you need to be sure to unmount the device correctly before removing the card from the reader. For example, in Windows you need to select "Safely remove hardware". When you write files to the SD card, from any kind of ...


1

if you type on a terminal console: ls -l /d lrwxrwxrwx root root 2013-01-01 01:00 d -> /sys/kernel/debug/ meaning /d is a symlink to that other folder, probably there for compatibility with old versions. So now the question is: what is /sys/kernel/debug/? That folder is used to mount debugfs filesystem and it's used, as the name suggests, to debug ...


1

You need to be rooted to do this! Download and open any root browser. (I am Using Root Explorer for these instructions, ES File Manager works also) Go to System Go from Read Only to Read/Write Find Biuld Prop Open with text editor Find ro.camera.sound.forced Change the 1 to 0 Save Changes Reboot SOURCE: ...


1

this feature (syncfolder pc to phone) will be developed in SnapsBackups Android app. SnapsBackups execute backups phone to pc by wifi network and withtout human interaction. the backups will be performed when the system notifies the application that wifi network is connected. SnapsBackups evaluates that wifi is a personal wifi, verify that exist a backup for ...


1

Pretty normal. With Android 4.4, Google decided apps shall no longer have write access on the external SDCard – unless they are system apps (or have root privileges). They call that "security" (while others call it "crippling", and doubt "security" being the real reason behind – rather suspecting "cloudy interests"). While apps still can store their own ...


1

The problem that I have faced was caused by trying to install update of android 4.4.2 for my galaxy s3 while the update requires the previous version which is MK3 (android 4.3). As I mentioned in the question, I have formatted and deleted the whole system that's why status 7 error showed up because "system/build.prop" was already deleted. The only possible ...


1

Multiple approaches here, none tried myself as I never had that issue: First, before manually altering the symlinks, you might need to re-mount the root file system read-write. Still, even if you succeed this way, you might have to repeat the actions after each reboot – so let's check for other alternatives. There are several apps availabe which care for ...



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