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7

The filesystem support is device-specific, and in fact many devices using Android 2.3 support ext3 in the kernel (or ext4, which can also mount ext3 and ext2 filesystems). Usually the difference in filesystem support is due to different hardware. Older devices often used raw NAND flash chips and MTD drivers in Linux, which did not support conventional ...


6

First, you need to be aware of two facts: Android uses more than one file system (think of "multiple drives/partitions" when comparing with your computer while sharing a common base, directory structures might differ between manufacturers So as starting points, I further recommend the file-system tag-wiki and the partition tag-wiki (you might also want ...


5

I installed the Disk Info app and in the options, I enabled Expert mode and Unmounted partitions. It doesn't say "swap", but it shows clearly that it's the only other partition on the SD card and it's the right size, so /dev/block/mmcblk1p2 must be the one: Swapper 2 is configured to use /dev/block/mmcblk0p3 by default, so I'm glad I didn't go with the ...


4

This is apparently a known bug in Android which is not even acknowledged by Google since Oct 2012 — depending on the method of creating files on the Android device, these files may remain invisible when accessing the device using MTP, until the device is rebooted. Known workarounds include: Use USB storage mode instead of MTP, if it is supported by the ...


4

LOST.DIR is just a storage space (directory) for files that were recovered upon boot. You can safetly remove it with no problems. The sysytem keeps it just in case you want to get your recovered currupted files back. A quick google search yielded: LOST.DIR - what is it? As for preventing it from being created, just prevent the SD card from becoming ...


4

Baidu is the Chinese competitor of Google. I can't but notice your nickname Leng sounds Chinese as well! So my bet goes to your phone having Chinese apps, including one related to the Baidu search engine. These folders are definitely being made by this app. These folders also might not be empty; content which starts with a .dotBeforeName is hidden, and ...


4

1) On which physical storage does "Memory" sit When the specs say "Memory", it's referring to the RAM that the device has. This is not persistent storage, it is "volatile" storage, which loses its information when unpowered (after a brief discharge time). RAM is memory the system and apps use to function, for things like storing the state of an ...


4

It's even riskier than cybersam says. You shouldn't check/repair a mounted filesystem (i.e. when it is in use), on any operating system, because programs might be using the files while you're checking them and possibly making changes. This could cause the checker to think there are errors where there are really no errors; it might cause unexpected behaviour ...


3

fdisk -l works if you pass the whole disk device name explicitly (e.g., fdisk -l /dev/block/mmcblk1); what does not work is automatic discovery of block devices (apparently because Android places block device files under the /dev/block directory, but fdisk expects to see those files directly in /dev). Therefore one option is to collect the list of whole disk ...


3

As you may already know, you can only access those files with root, i.e. if your device is rooted. I can copy and paste the file to another location, but I think this may change the nature of the file. Whut? No, copying a file will not change the file contents. They will be the same as of the time the copy process is started. Ideally, you should make ...


3

It doesn't matter where you put them. A convenient place usually is the (internal or external) SD card, where you simply could create a Photos folder, and extract your photos to. The gallery app simply checks the devices media database, it doesn't check the directories directly. This database gets fed by the so-called Media Scanner, which gets triggered by ...


3

As Shywim wrote, direct access from your Windows PC is limited to certain directories – by default. But there are some helpers available to give you more details. Some examples include: DavDrive Lite – make the local file system available via WebDAV. This would require another 3rd party tool on your Windows PC (some WebDAV client) FTPServer – a small and ...


3

If your phone is not rooted, then you can't access the "OS" or the "programms". When you plug your phone, you can only browse its internal and/or external storage in a file explorer. If you are not rooted, you can use adb to browse the "OS", but you can only view it and you can not access /data folder. If you are rooted, you can access and write all to the ...


2

That's two different things, at least the first depending on a) Android version, b) manufacturer, and c) sometimes even the device in question: before Android 4.0, /sdcard usually was were the external SDCard was to be found starting with Android 4.0 (or even 3.x?), this changed for most devices, and usually became the place of the so-called internal ...


2

The literature you read was wrong, then. Link2SD only uses the extra partition. The main partition is still mounted under /media/sdcard or somewhere similar. With Link2SD, you cannot physically remove the SD card, but you can mount the SD card on the computer. The second partition does not get mounted, so the apps are still accessible while the standard ...


2

Note that this is not guranteed to be the case with every update, and may vary from device to device. However, in every case I'm familiar with, this has held true. OTA/Automatic updates (and many but not all ROMs installed with a custom Recovery) will generally ignore anything inside the /sdcard/ directory. I keep everything in there and whenever I switch ...


2

There's no OS-wide "Trash" or "Recycle bin" like other shells have. However, the Android design guidelines recommend app authors to put something like that in each app as appropriate, to allow undoing deletes. Thus, in one app, a delete button might delete the content immediately, while another might mark the content as deleted but wait for some time before ...


2

Prior to ICS, Android used /system/mnt/sdcard as the point for mount. Some versions by manufacturers used /system/sdcard instead. ICS, thereafter, changed it, but kept existing mount point for backwards compatibility with legacy apps. Now, /system/storage/sdcard0 or /system/storage/sdcard1, particularly, JB on tablets, is used to accomodate multiple ...


2

I don't know about "legacy" or "0", but /sdcard is a symbolic link to the sdcard device folder. At the terminal, run "ls -l". Add the end of some lines, you will see: sdcard -> /mnt/sdcard etc -> /system/etc and maybe others depending on your setup. This is standard Linux setup, and makes both places link the same place - so there is no ...


2

There's no direct equivalent in Android. Each app has its own directory in /data/data (for a multi-user system, it's /data/users/n). Apps are encouraged to show a metadata-based view of user data, instead of requiring the user to worry about individual files. Each app stores the files and databases that hold its documents, and its configuration files, in its ...


2

If you are logged into your Google account, your Phrasebook will synchronize across devices and you can also access it from the web interface of Google Translate. Furthermore, after importing to Anki you can synchronize your decks across devices. In the web interface of Google Translate, show the Phrasebook by clicking the Phrasebook icon in the upper ...


2

Most devices have the system partition mounted as read-only. You need to remount the partition with write access so that you can modify the files. This free app should work. Other utilities such as ES File Explorer and Titanium Backup also have the ability to remount the system partition as writeable. Alternatively, you can use a Terminal Emulator or ADB ...


2

It might be that this option will try to repair any filesystem issues that it finds. If a repair attempt does not do the right thing, or is prevented from completion (say, the battery dies), you could end up with unusable files; or, if the repair attempt failed in the system partition, you could end up with a dead device (but you might be able to recover ...


1

According to a post on SO, cat /proc/net/tcp will return it in the second column, with the heading "local_address", e.g. "CF00A8C0:0203". The part after ":" is a port number. From the rest use the last two (C0) as a hex number, e.g. C0 is 192, which is the start of the address in this example. Further: The IP address is displayed as a ...


1

Android itself is based on Linux, which is designed for case-sensitive filesystems. Internal storage is usually on an ext or ext4 filesystem, which is case-sensitive. SD cards are usually formatted with FAT 32, which is a case-insensitive filesystem. Although Android can support using other filesystems on the SD card, Windows PCs can't, so it's unusual to ...


1

It's entirely up to the drive and enclosure. The USB mass storage protocol doesn't have disk-specific instructions, e.g. for spinning up and down drives. The only thing you can do from the Android side is make sure the files aren't in use: e.g. by adding a .nomedia file as you already found.


1

WARNING: I have not tested this procedure. You would need to have fstrim in system/bin. This XDA post has a DropBox download link. start up adb and then switch users to root. $ adb shell from your os terminal. $ su to switch to the root user. To copy fstrim to your /system/bin path you first need to mount the system path as Read/Write from adb or some ...


1

All apps (root or not) have a default data directory, which is /data/data/<package_name>. By default, the apps databases, settings, and all other data go here. If an app expects huge amounts of data to be stored, or for other reasons wants to "be nice to internal storage", there's a corresponding directory on the SDCard ...


1

ES Datei Explorer is more than just a simple file explorer. It offers a bunch of additional features, which explain most of the permissions you've listed. I'm using this app for years already and can assure you: it never abused any of the permissions (especially I never saw it making "phone calls", and yes, I supervise such things). But for the things you ...


1

The problem was that the ext3/ext4 filesystem on /dev/lvpool/system, normally mounted at /system, had a corrupt superblock. The fix was to connect to the phone with adb and run e2fsck manually, like so: # ./adb shell # e2fsck /dev/lvpool/system e2fsck 1.41.11 (14-Mar-2010) e2fsck: Superblock invalid, trying backup blocks... Backing up journal inode block ...



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