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13

I usually use a combination of the following 4 commands and correlate them, since each of these commands gives a piece of the information that might be needed. Summarily: Using df lists the filesystem path alias and size info as seen below (total size, used, free and block size) Example output: root@ks01lte:/sdcard # df df Filesystem ...


10

The Android system does not have the conventional /etc/passwd storage for users and groups. In android, user and groups are used to isolate processes and grant permissions. The Android system creates a user per application when an application gets installed. Hence application data files are stored in /data/data/<app-name>/, and are read-writable only ...


4

Where should I install Toybox? Would it make more sense to install Toybox to my system partition, or to my data partition? Depends. If you don't plan to factory reset the phone ever again, you can choose data partition, else, choose system partition. When a command is provided both by Android and by Toybox, I want the Toybox version to win. The ...


3

I'll now guide you through the procedure of writing a custom flashable ZIP, for the purpose of renaming your sh.old.bak. To begin, create the following tree of folders: /META-INF/com/google/android Once you created them, move to the android folder, and create the following new files. Make sure that they don't have any extension at their end: updater-...


3

Let's clear up some confusion. Things to always remember: /data/app contains the APK of an app. (PACKAGE → package name of an app) Android 4.x: if the app is installed using Package installer of Android the file name would be PACKAGE-*.apk where * is often a positive integer. /data/app isn't supposed to have any directory inside it. Android 5.x: ...


3

What is rootfs? It's an initramfs. Basically, it's a prepopulated RAM drive. It's prepopulated with some content at boot time, usually from a cpio archive which has been compiled into the kernel. Can I write to it? One way to make changes to your rootfs is to unpack the cpio archive, make your changes, and repack the archive. Your device will almost ...


3

Use these commands su -c 'busybox mount -o remount,rw /' # this will remount rootfs at / in rw mode su -c 'mkdir /mnt/"NEW_DIR"' # replace NEW_DIR with the name of the directory you aim to create under /mnt Note that in Android /mnt is not a mount point for any real or pseudo-filesystem but its sub-directories are (actually, /mnt is a sub-...


3

Gigabytes are base 10, but Android uses Gibibytes (base 2) See: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=16GB+to+GiB. This is needed because binary data is written in base 2, but SI units are base 10.


3

The answer to your question is built into your phones OS. 1. Put the SD card in your phone 2. Reformat the SD card with your phone(Settings --> Storage/Storage & USB) 3. The file system on the freshly formatted SD card is the type that will give you the best performance with your phone. 4. Outside the context of your phone the optimum file system is ...


3

From a root shell/terminal: dd if=/dev/block/platform/*/by-name/modem of=/sdcard/NON-HLOS.bin On some devices it might be radio instead of modem and you can, of course, place it somewhere other than /sdcard. Note also that it will typically be padded with zeroes on the end — for example, the NON-HLOS.bin I flashed was 57.1 MB but when I retrieve it ...


3

This is done so that on a device without a removable SD Card 1 - you'd still be able to copy files to and from the device, and 2 - user's data can be stored separately from system and app data. Regardless if a specific device has a removable SD Card, Android sets aside part of its internal memory that is reserved for user's media such as photos, music, ...


3

Apps installed on the SD-Card are stored in the ".android_secure" directory. You cant see the APK files directly in that folder because the it is encrypted to prevent direct access to the APK file of paid apps.


2

Since this commit notification policy settings were migrated from the separate /data/system/notification_policy.xml file to the generic AppOps subsystem. Now they are stored in /data/system/appops.xml together with other AppOps settings.


2

The best way is relative and dependant on not just hardware but also your desire to modify and or automate. For one-shot tasks I'd suggest adb & for special projects and automation I'd suggest Casual or Xposed. For messing with stuff I probably shouldn't, I'd definitely start with Xposed if I were you because the settings can be non-permanent. To help ...


2

Unforgettableid's comment included an AnandTech article that describes the conditions under which fstrim is supposed to run: I’ve learned a bit more on the conditions underlying when Android 4.3 will TRIM filesystems, as it wasn’t completely clear before. The Android framework will send out a “start idle maintenance window” event that the MountService ...


2

In the settings of Google Play Music, if you have it set to cache on the external SD card, your cache location will be /external_sd/Android/data/com.google.android.music/files/music/. If you have it use the internal storage, the path will be /sdcard/Android/data/com.google.android.music/files/music. Note that these files are named [some-id].mp3, like 124....


2

MacroDroid (free up to five macros) can do the job. The macro would be: Trigger: Day/Time Trigger → select all the days and choose the time for trigger activation Action: File Operation → Delete → select the folder that needs to be cleared → All Files Edit: { There is a catch here. Unless the device is rooted, only the files at the ...


2

It's in YourLocalStorage/Android/data/com.dropbox.android/files/uXXXXXX/scratch/Your/Folder/In/Dropbox/file.pdf Note that YourLocalStorage depends on your mobile. For example, it is storage/emulated/0/ on some LG phones. To access the file from your web browser you have to put file:/// before the given path.


2

Yes. If the files are identical, by definition, they should also be identical in size, regardless of platform (Unless the file is a sparse file, and/or the mechanism by which the FS driver of the platform reports file sizes is buggy). But for identical apps, however: Not necessarily. The file size mostly differs for native-compiled executable code (ARM vs. ...


2

Even it does not fully answer the question, here's a guide to decrypt the external storage formatted as internal. The gist is that we you search for strings including the keyword expand and ending with .key within vold using: $ strings vold|grep -i expand --change-name=0:android_expand %s/expand_%s.key /mnt/expand/%s It returns a 16-byte key. ...


2

The filesystem you're trying to create the symbolic link on doesn't support symbolic links. All the native Linux filesystems (ext2-4) support symlinks, but the DOS filesystem used on SD cards doesn't, and several others don't. For a filesystem implemented with FUSE (as in this case), it's entirely up to the filesystem driver, so you can't tell whether it ...


2

I am the developer of this Droid Explorer which does show hidden files. If you are talking about this droid explorer app then I can't help you, as I have nothing to do with that app. I would suggest you contact the developer of that app. His contact info is at the bottom of the link I posted. I am going to assume you mean the App for Android Devices, not ...


2

Press the overflow menu button in the upper right. Select the show storage option. There will now be a new item below the Recent menu item in the slide out drawer for the devices storage.


1

I'd say so. When uploading large files (~200 MB), I have gotten "Low memory" errors, even though I had over 500MB (out of 16 GB internal) free. This notification would go a few seconds after the upload completed. Typically, about 300 MB causes low memory errors for me. I have a Moto G3 running the CrDroid custom ROM, 6.0.1 (Marshmallow). I don't know the ...


1

As you already expected, the way your question is phrased it looks like an XY problem: There are different ways to achieve your goal (mounting /data, /cache etc. from a different partition), while your question focuses on "editing fstab". For a working solution, see e.g. Mount a folder from external sd as /data: What's described there should work on all ...


1

The correct file to modify is the build prop. Which can be risky to modify. This will enable everything needed. Through the file system modify the build.prop or with a computer. If the custom recovery is TWRP or possibly CWM. Then adb comes pre-enabled. Then you also need root and a computer with adb. boot into your custom recovery. Plug your device into ...


1

By default, when connecting your device it gets mounted via mtp. Our mtp tag-wiki gives some details on this; basically, only parts of the device's storage is exposed – usually only the SD card(s). In easy terms, you can think of this as something similar to your "Windows Shares", where you define directories to be available over the network (with the ...


1

Using Total Commander to remount the / directory as RW also remounted /system as RW. Howto: Enable Root Functions Everywhere in TC settings. Proceed to add a new button to the toolbar with Function Type Internal Command. Press on the >> button, and select the 119 Remount option. Press OK/Apply Navigate to root (/) directory. Press newly created ...


1

Multiple things in this context: apps might directly support using the external SD card as storage, check with their settings. This will save you some headaches, as it then works without "tricks". When changing to the new storage, apps might even offer to copy/move their data over, which would be the easiest thing for you to do. As Gokul mentioned in his ...


1

I don't think there is a standard location for the sd card directory but look for a folder called external_sd. It will depend on your tablet model. Perversely, it will not be your /sdcard directory, this folder is your embedded storage.



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