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6

I installed the Disk Info app and in the options, I enabled Expert mode and Unmounted partitions. It doesn't say "swap", but it shows clearly that it's the only other partition on the SD card and it's the right size, so /dev/block/mmcblk1p2 must be the one: Swapper 2 is configured to use /dev/block/mmcblk0p3 by default, so I'm glad I didn't go with the ...


6

FolderSync could come in handy here. Define a "folder pair" (i.e. which directory on your Android device to sync with which directory on your computer), using any of the available protocols (SFTP, Samba, or any other). Then either chose for some "auto-check" (e.g. have it synced every night), or push the button manually. Using the paid version, you could ...


5

fdisk -l works if you pass the whole disk device name explicitly (e.g., fdisk -l /dev/block/mmcblk1); what does not work is automatic discovery of block devices (apparently because Android places block device files under the /dev/block directory, but fdisk expects to see those files directly in /dev). Therefore one option is to collect the list of whole disk ...


5

It's even riskier than cybersam says. You shouldn't check/repair a mounted filesystem (i.e. when it is in use), on any operating system, because programs might be using the files while you're checking them and possibly making changes. This could cause the checker to think there are errors where there are really no errors; it might cause unexpected behaviour ...


5

Here's a helpful piece of info also. This is the absolute path to SMS and MMS DB on most android devices: /data/data/com.android.providers/telephony/databases/mmssms.db


4

Baidu is the Chinese competitor of Google. I can't but notice your nickname Leng sounds Chinese as well! So my bet goes to your phone having Chinese apps, including one related to the Baidu search engine. These folders are definitely being made by this app. These folders also might not be empty; content which starts with a .dotBeforeName is hidden, and ...


4

1) On which physical storage does "Memory" sit When the specs say "Memory", it's referring to the RAM that the device has. This is not persistent storage, it is "volatile" storage, which loses its information when unpowered (after a brief discharge time). RAM is memory the system and apps use to function, for things like storing the state of an ...


3

It might be that this option will try to repair any filesystem issues that it finds. If a repair attempt does not do the right thing, or is prevented from completion (say, the battery dies), you could end up with unusable files; or, if the repair attempt failed in the system partition, you could end up with a dead device (but you might be able to recover ...


3

If you are logged into your Google account, your Phrasebook will synchronize across devices and you can also access it from the web interface of Google Translate. Furthermore, after importing to Anki you can synchronize your decks across devices. In the web interface of Google Translate, show the Phrasebook by clicking the Phrasebook icon in the upper ...


3

It doesn't matter where you put them. A convenient place usually is the (internal or external) SD card, where you simply could create a Photos folder, and extract your photos to. The gallery app simply checks the devices media database, it doesn't check the directories directly. This database gets fed by the so-called Media Scanner, which gets triggered by ...


3

As you may already know, you can only access those files with root, i.e. if your device is rooted. I can copy and paste the file to another location, but I think this may change the nature of the file. Whut? No, copying a file will not change the file contents. They will be the same as of the time the copy process is started. Ideally, you should make ...


3

One way you can achieve this is using an app - rSync and use a Tasker job to periodically (or conditionally) upload/download data from your phone. You can refer to rSync's documentation for its configuration and other setup steps. You can configure it to only specify required one way transfer of files.


2

In my case multiple reboots did not fix the issue. Clearing the app data did. I had to let the file system rebuild itself every time I went to a new directory but it worked after the rebuilding was done.


2

Note that this is not guranteed to be the case with every update, and may vary from device to device. However, in every case I'm familiar with, this has held true. OTA/Automatic updates (and many but not all ROMs installed with a custom Recovery) will generally ignore anything inside the /sdcard/ directory. I keep everything in there and whenever I switch ...


2

There's no OS-wide "Trash" or "Recycle bin" like other shells have. However, the Android design guidelines recommend app authors to put something like that in each app as appropriate, to allow undoing deletes. Thus, in one app, a delete button might delete the content immediately, while another might mark the content as deleted but wait for some time before ...


2

Prior to ICS, Android used /system/mnt/sdcard as the point for mount. Some versions by manufacturers used /system/sdcard instead. ICS, thereafter, changed it, but kept existing mount point for backwards compatibility with legacy apps. Now, /system/storage/sdcard0 or /system/storage/sdcard1, particularly, JB on tablets, is used to accomodate multiple ...


2

Because of how Android has evolved over the years many newer devices have the same files mounted (usually with a bind mount) in multiple places. Others are symbolic links. It's really too bad that the file manager app isn't showing you these details :-/


2

I don't know about "legacy" or "0", but /sdcard is a symbolic link to the sdcard device folder. At the terminal, run "ls -l". Add the end of some lines, you will see: sdcard -> /mnt/sdcard etc -> /system/etc and maybe others depending on your setup. This is standard Linux setup, and makes both places link the same place - so there is no ...


2

There's no direct equivalent in Android. Each app has its own directory in /data/data (for a multi-user system, it's /data/users/n). Apps are encouraged to show a metadata-based view of user data, instead of requiring the user to worry about individual files. Each app stores the files and databases that hold its documents, and its configuration files, in its ...


2

Most devices have the system partition mounted as read-only. You need to remount the partition with write access so that you can modify the files. This free app should work. Other utilities such as ES File Explorer and Titanium Backup also have the ability to remount the system partition as writeable. Alternatively, you can use a Terminal Emulator or ADB ...


2

I use "ES File Explorer" as a file explorer on my device. This allows the creation of file shortcuts. Once installed, just choose the homepage you want the shortcut, press and hold on the homescreen and you should be prompted to add a widget / app / shortcut. In shortcuts, choose "Es File Explorer" and it then lets you choose the file you want a shortcut ...


2

I thought that root was required to do this. That's not quite right. Any user can see that directory, but only root can write to it. Directories lower down the hierarchy such as /data/data are not world-readable, so while you'll be able to see that that directory exists, you won't be able to see its contents on an unrooted device. Some file managers ...


1

Are you talking about Google Play Movies & TV? I think this is only for rented / purchased movies in Google Play. To play an MP4 file on your device, try an app like MX Player.


1

The app is most likely asking you for PS2's original BIOS files. Usually BIOS files are copyrighted by the manufacturer, and are illegal to distribute. You will have to do your own research on how to obtain them. Your best bet of getting developer's support is over at their SourceForge site, which seems to be the origin of the app.


1

Not really an Android question (rather Linux/Shell/Bash), but I give the credit of the missing executable. So: for i in * ; do j=`echo $i | tr '[a-m][n-z][A-M][N-Z]' '[n-z][a-m][N-Z][A-M]'`; mv "$i" "$j"; done


1

The solution was to reboot the phone. The com.fsck.k9 directory is now visible on the top level of the phones file system.


1

According to a post on SO, cat /proc/net/tcp will return it in the second column, with the heading "local_address", e.g. "CF00A8C0:0203". The part after ":" is a port number. From the rest use the last two (C0) as a hex number, e.g. C0 is 192, which is the start of the address in this example. Further: The IP address is displayed as a ...


1

Android itself is based on Linux, which is designed for case-sensitive filesystems. Internal storage is usually on an ext or ext4 filesystem, which is case-sensitive. SD cards are usually formatted with FAT 32, which is a case-insensitive filesystem. Although Android can support using other filesystems on the SD card, Windows PCs can't, so it's unusual to ...


1

Sure not. All changes made there are gone with the next boot: you are just modifying a file on a "temporary file-system" here, which is created on boot, and "gone" on shutdown. For persistent changes, you would need to change the boot image. As you compare with Linux on a PC, think of a initrd.img (initrd aka "initial RAM disk, or initramfs). The root file ...



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