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10

The Android system does not have the conventional /etc/passwd storage for users and groups. In android, user and groups are used to isolate processes and grant permissions. The Android system creates a user per application when an application gets installed. Hence application data files are stored in /data/data/<app-name>/, and are read-writable only ...


4

Similar to ScoobyDo's answer Disconnect the USB cable from phone. Click 'Clear data' on the Media Storage application. Then 'Force stop'. Reconnect the USB cable to phone. The Media Storage application is restarted and rebuilds the media list. Missing files are now available. This avoids rebooting, which was important for me. Your mileage may vary


4

I usually use a combination of the following 4 commands and correlate them, since each of these commands gives a piece of the information that might be needed. Summarily: Using df lists the filesystem path alias and size info as seen below (total size, used, free and block size) Example output: root@ks01lte:/sdcard # df df Filesystem ...


4

Izzy opined it correctly here that the only sensible place for having factory home screen layout is the launcher's APK itself. Since I don't own a Lenovo device let alone your specific model I used my MTK device running stock 4.2.1 as the testing ground. It has stock launcher (com.android.launcher). About that thing called factory home screen layout -- ...


3

A .conf file is usually readable by any text file reader as long as permissions are correct. The said file contains SSID and password of your portable Wi-Fi hotspot. E.g.: Android.SE #$#$ANDROID where Android.SE is the SSID which other users would see when trying to locate Wi-Fi network and #$#$ANDROID is the password they need to enter to connect to ...


3

You can see sizes and usage statistics of all mounted partitions by simply using this command: df Note, the typical df -h does not work here and is not needed because the output is already in megabytes. The command works within adb shell and the Android terminal emulator, but not in the Recovery mode terminal because nothing is mounted at that point.


3

Let's clear up some confusion. Things to always remember: /data/app contains the APK of an app. (PACKAGE → package name of an app) Android 4.x: if the app is installed using Package installer of Android the file name would be PACKAGE-*.apk where * is often a positive integer. /data/app isn't supposed to have any directory inside it. Android 5.x: ...


3

Gigabytes are base 10, but Android uses Gibibytes (base 2) See: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=16GB+to+GiB. This is needed because binary data is written in base 2, but SI units are base 10.


2

If I'm not mistaken you can force android to fsck both the internal and external storage on reboot by doing the following depending on your rom. run terminal app and type su touch /forcefsck Then reboot source: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=57027579&postcount=20


2

In my stock Android 4.2.1 the file responsible for holding Desktop backup password seems to be /data/backup/pwhash. I took a backup of it, renamed it, restarted the device, and the password was reset to empty. Now I could create a new password from the Settings easily. In CM12, I had to rename two files, namely pwhash and pwversion, and everything went ...


2

You can use tune2fs (shell command) for this. The target output entry is 'Block size'. The corresponding block device (mmcblk1p1) depends on your hardware and needs to be replaced respectively. tune2fs -l /dev/block/mmcblk1p1


2

the current directory is the first entry in the history. i checked just now. its just below the sd card list.


2

Unforgettableid's comment included an AnandTech article that describes the conditions under which fstrim is supposed to run: I’ve learned a bit more on the conditions underlying when Android 4.3 will TRIM filesystems, as it wasn’t completely clear before. The Android framework will send out a “start idle maintenance window” event that the MountService ...


2

I just tried and found that you need to modify a file: sys/class/power_supply/usb/device/charge its default content is '1' which means 'enable charging' you need to set it to '0' to 'disable charging' $ su $ echo 0 > /sys/class/power_supply/usb/device/charge I tested on Nexus 4 and it's working successfully.


2

It's in YourLocalStorage/Android/data/com.dropbox.android/files/uXXXXXX/scratch/Your/Folder/In/Dropbox/file.pdf Note that YourLocalStorage depends on your mobile. For example, it is storage/emulated/0/ on some LG phones. To access the file from your web browser you have to put file:/// before the given path.


2

Since this commit notification policy settings were migrated from the separate /data/system/notification_policy.xml file to the generic AppOps subsystem. Now they are stored in /data/system/appops.xml together with other AppOps settings.


2

Yes. If the files are identical, by definition, they should also be identical in size, regardless of platform (Unless the file is a sparse file, and/or the mechanism by which the FS driver of the platform reports file sizes is buggy). But for identical apps, however: Not necessarily. The file size mostly differs for native-compiled executable code (ARM vs. ...


2

Where should I install Toybox? Would it make more sense to install Toybox to my system partition, or to my data partition? Depends. If you don't plan to factory reset the phone ever again, you can choose data partition, else, choose system partition. When a command is provided both by Android and by Toybox, I want the Toybox version to win. The ...


2

What is rootfs? It's an initramfs. Basically, it's a prepopulated RAM drive. It's prepopulated with some content at boot time, usually from a cpio archive which has been compiled into the kernel. Can I write to it? One way to make changes to your rootfs is to unpack the cpio archive, make your changes, and repack the archive. Your device will almost ...


2

I am the developer of this Droid Explorer which does show hidden files. If you are talking about this droid explorer app then I can't help you, as I have nothing to do with that app. I would suggest you contact the developer of that app. His contact info is at the bottom of the link I posted. I am going to assume you mean the App for Android Devices, not ...


1

Multiple things in this context: apps might directly support using the external SD card as storage, check with their settings. This will save you some headaches, as it then works without "tricks". When changing to the new storage, apps might even offer to copy/move their data over, which would be the easiest thing for you to do. As Gokul mentioned in his ...


1

MacroDroid (free up to five macros) can do the job. The macro would be: Trigger: Day/Time Trigger → select all the days and choose the time for trigger activation Action: File Operation → Delete → select the folder that needs to be cleared → All Files Edit: { There is a catch here. Unless the device is rooted, only the files at the ...


1

The best way is relotive and dependant on not just hardware but also your desire to modify and or automate. For one shot tasks I'd suggest ADB & for special projects and automation I'd suggest Casual or Xposed. For messing with stuff I probably shouldn't I'd deffenatly start with Xposed if I where you because the settings can be non-perminate. To help ...


1

I don't think there is a standard location for the sd card directory but look for a folder called external_sd. It will depend on your tablet model. Perversely, it will not be your /sdcard directory, this folder is your embedded storage.


1

To get access to the filesystem you need to be rooted and you need to use ADB. MTP is way to limited for the low level access your needing.


1

In the settings of Google Play Music, if you have it set to cache on the external SD card, your cache location will be /external_sd/Android/data/com.google.android.music/files/music/. If you have it use the internal storage, the path will be /sdcard/Android/data/com.google.android.music/files/music. Note that these files are named [some-id].mp3, like ...


1

Thats a big diff but maybe you use spotify with offline files or something? Also its worth checking Settings->Storage. Click on "Cached data" for instance and clear, here you see what it taking space more in detail.


1

There are already answers for all parts of your question, so let me sum up: Android Folder Hierarchy has some general information Confused by the many locations of the virtual /sdcard/ should answer the last part of your question The /sdcard direcory and other directory conventions: how is the Android filesystem structured? might also be helpful If you ...


1

sometimes empty folders are used as asset staging while an app is running, as well as what's been mentioned. another way to check for hidden files is to get a terminal app, navigate to the directory in question and run the following: ls -a any hidden objects will have a "." prefix. make sure you know that these are not needed by an app, etc. before ...


1

From what I read here: http://androidforums.com/threads/can-empty-subdirectories-subfolders-be-deleted.324275/ You can delete empty folders if they are really empty. Sometimes Android creates folder with invisible files. The way to check if the folder is really empty is using explorer apps like Cabinet or Explorer.



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