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In the Android settings you should be able to find a screen where you can see more details (probably in "Settings->Storage") about how your storage is used. But from the list above I can see you are missing two important items that typically use storage: The Android system and the Cache. Those two items may not be available to the File Explorer app since ...


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Thats a big diff but maybe you use spotify with offline files or something? Also its worth checking Settings->Storage. Click on "Cached data" for instance and clear, here you see what it taking space more in detail.


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The Android system does not have the conventional /etc/passwd storage for users and groups. In android, user and groups are used to isolate processes and grant permissions. The Android system creates a user per application when an application gets installed. Hence application data files are stored in /data/data/<app-name>/, and are read-writable only ...


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Since this commit notification policy settings were migrated from the separate /data/system/notification_policy.xml file to the generic AppOps subsystem. Now they are stored in /data/system/appops.xml together with other AppOps settings.


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If I'm not mistaken you can force android to fsck both the internal and external storage on reboot by doing the following depending on your rom. run terminal app and type su touch /forcefsck Then reboot source: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=57027579&postcount=20


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I usually use a combination of the following 4 commands and correlate them, since each of these commands gives a piece of the information that might be needed. Summarily: Using df lists the filesystem path alias and size info as seen below (total size, used, free and block size) Example output: root@ks01lte:/sdcard # df df Filesystem ...


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The best way is relotive and dependant on not just hardware but also your desire to modify and or automate. For one shot tasks I'd suggest ADB & for special projects and automation I'd suggest Casual or Xposed. For messing with stuff I probably shouldn't I'd deffenatly start with Xposed if I where you because the settings can be non-perminate. To help ...


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In KitKat by default, non-system apps (for example Es file manager) cannot make changes to the external SD card due to security policies. To get around this issue, you can use your device's built in file manager to manage the external SD card. If your device doesn't have a system file manager, you'll have to root the device to give Es full access to your ...


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Application storage location setting (internal or external SD card) in Android system settings involves location of application's private files such as databases or preferences. These files cannot be accessed by user unless the user has root privileges. Application may create additional folders on it's own on your external SD card and nothing can be done ...



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