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28

Short Answer: Currently you can't make use of your device (any device that relies on MTP) to act as an MSC, due to the protocol specifications! Elaborating As to clarify, Galaxy Nexus uses one massive partition for the entire device, its like saying that: system, data and sdcard are all together. MTP was selected for Galaxy Nexus because it allows the ...


19

Android 4.0 introduces WiFi Direct in to the core of android. it basically creates an adhoc connection between one device and another using WiFi by creating what I guess could be considered an Access Point. You do not need a wifi access point to use WiFi Direct, and actually, if you are connected to wifi when turning on WiFi direct, it will disconnect you. ...


16

A service like Dropbox should be able to do this for you. It'll sync the files up to the web, and then your PC (with Dropbox installed) should pull them down.


13

There are many variables that affect the performance of each method you've mentioned. Additionally there's also the necessary configuration and requirements that each device must have in order to have solutions like this working. As requested, lets summarize and compare possible performances between USB; Wi-Fi and Bluetooth: USB: USB performance can be ...


12

ES File Explorer has support for several cloud storage providers. It allows to "copy" folders from your dropbox folder to your SD-Card etc in a similar fashion as you would copy files locally. The "Network" Tab allows you to add an account.


11

I am using Dropbox and it works fine for me. When you click on a file to see it, Dropbox downloads the content probably in a temp file and it will launch in the right viewer. If you long click an item and select download it will put the file in its own folder on the SD card (SDcard/dropbox) and the file will be available to a file manager such as Astro. If ...


9

Newer Android devices don't support USB mass storage because it has a big shortcoming: the phone and the PC can't access the storage at the same time that way. This is because USB mass storage is a low-level protocol giving the PC low-level access to the whole filesystem. This causes knock-on problems when you connect your phone to the PC:- Apps on the ...


8

Connect your computer with virtual hotspot created by Android device. Install any FTP Server app on Android device. It'll NOT give you IP of device for sure. :) In your computer, find IP of Default Gateway of Wi-Fi network of Step 1 (In Windows, you can use ipconfig cmd command). Its the IP of your device. Use any FTP Client software on computer. Use ...


8

You can't, this is a current permission problem (bugreport here) of Android 4.0+'s /sdcard folder if it's not using FAT32 (but FUSE). Reason: There's a transition away from FAT32 to unified user storage for both apps and media data (using ext4) on a single file system. We got tired of seeing OEMs include many GB of internal storage for music, while ...


7

Settings >> Connect to PC >> USB Connection Type should be set to "Disk drive" (you can set this as a default connection type, but I prefer to do it manually when I need it). Also, you can set it via the notifcations bar by clicking on the USB connection type as it appears; a selection box of the various options should appear. Once mounted, ...


7

It may be possible to export a loopbacked image file via USB as UMS/MSC. You will definitely need: root kernel support: loopback (/dev/block/loop0) and UMS (/sys/devices/platform/usb_mass_storage/) custom app to enable/disable this or a custom init script to always export the image file Here's an example for an easy hackable app, a little development ...


6

There seems to be multiple options available. With a relevant internet search there is an application called Bump which shares files by simply bumping both devices together. I'm not sure if it does it over wifi if available or only does it over 3G. There is another option where you can set up an ftp server on the device using an application called SwiFTP ...


6

I'll expand idea of Ryan Conrad: adb from android-tools is the way. I prefer to follow this guide to install Eclipse with android-sdk: http://developer.android.com/sdk/installing.html Installation depends only on JDK. No installing of new packages. I personally do the same few steps (=extracting two folders anywhere and configuring eclipse) in the same ...


6

You can use bluetooth. Bluetooth FTP (file transfer profile) is supported by Linux and there's the Bluetooth File Transfer app that adds this functionality to android. It's however not that fast (<200kb/s) depending on your bluetooth versions. – There's a fuse module called obexfs, here's my Nexus S mounted: root@local:/tmp# obexfs -b ...


6

The default location is already on your external SD card in the /bluetooth folder. It's not possible to configure it up to Android 4.1 Jelly Bean: With the included stock bluetooth receiver you cannot change the location as of now, because it's hard coded. You need a 3rd party app like Bluetooth file transfer which might be configurable here. In ...


6

FolderSync could come in handy here. Define a "folder pair" (i.e. which directory on your Android device to sync with which directory on your computer), using any of the available protocols (SFTP, Samba, or any other). Then either chose for some "auto-check" (e.g. have it synced every night), or push the button manually. Using the paid version, you could ...


5

I would suggest using DropBox. The interface let's you upload or download files on an Android device. Additionally you can manage the files from any computer with DropBox installed on it. I've been a big fan of using DropBox on my Droid 1 :)


5

There's QtADB which uses adb. You can also install an SSH or ftp server on the phone and then use Nautilus with ssh://ip-or-name-of-your-phone/ or ftp://ip-or-name-of-your-phone/ URLs (you can create bookmarks in Nautilus). The cool thing about a standard SSH or ftp server on your phone is that you don't have to install anything special on the computer. I ...


5

Dropbox and Ubuntu One has Android client. FoxToPhone has a hidden feature to push arbitrary file from Firefox to your phone.


5

You could also try mtpfs or gMTP. mtpfs allows to mount the MTP device as a filesystem, while gMTP is a standalone program. Over at AskUbuntu there's an answer that shows how to use mtpfs.


5

You could also use a browser based remote desktop tool like Airdroid or Remote Web Desktop


5

Install Astro File Manager with Astro Bluetooth Module. Go to Networks page of Astro File Manager (using toolbar) and tap Bluetooth icon. On next screen, turn on Bluetooth and check OBEX FTP Server. After pairing, use Bluetooth software on PC to browse file system of device (almost all software work as OBEX FTP client). You can copy an entire folder from ...


5

ES File Explorer is one that can use the secure FTP protocol over ssh protocol. To get the settings, from ES File Explorer: Hit menu key, Show Tabs, Local, LAN, FTP, NET appears Tap on FTP Then tap on New that appears underneath, a dialog box will appear prompting the different FTP types, tap on SFTP Enter the details of the ssh server that hosts the ...


5

There are multiple solutions available: Using an USB Cable If you connect your device to your PC via an USB cable, it shares (parts of) its storage to the PC. With versions prior to Android 4.x your device usually identifies as USB storage (like any external disk/USB-stick attached), never Android versions might use MTP instead, which might require special ...


5

This suggestion assumes familiarity with connecting to the phone via ADB I had a similar situation on my previous phone. I was able to pull the important stuff over ADB when the phone was in recovery. In my case I had to mount some of the filesystems to access everything I wanted to retrieve. I'm not sure if it is dependent on the phone whether the ADB ...


5

One of the restrictions introduced with 4.4-kitkat was moving the WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE permission to protection-level "SignatureOrSystem", which means even if requested, a "normal app" (i.e. one you install yourself as "normal user" without any root specialities) will no longer get it granted. So there are very few things you can do to "work around" this: ...


4

GTalkSMS is able to send, browse and download files from your android phone via XMPP (gTalk). It's also a remote SMS notifier and has various other features. Note: According to the FAQ I have to disclose that I am involved in GTalkSMS. GTalkSMS is an open source GPL licensed Android app. Everyone can contribute.


4

WiFi File Explorer allows browsing of the SD card through a web based interface. Quite nice, but perhaps difficult to copy a large number of files. http://lifehacker.com/5626268/wifi-file-explorer-manages-your-android-sd-card-from-a-web-browser On Air (Wifi Disk) 'allows you to easily transfer files over your Wi-Fi connection by accessing it as if it were ...


4

You may have found something you are happy with now but I have compiled a binary of unison that works on android - it is possible using the hand-waving instructions you are talking about - I used them to cross-compile the linux source within ubuntu 12.10 using the android NDK and with a few alterations to the code it is now working. Follow the instructions ...


4

If you install Eclipse with the Android SDK there is a perspective called DDMS that includes a file explorer. You can easily copy files from/to the device with this tool, which uses adb push/pull in background. Another way is to simply unmount the SD card from the phone and use it as a mass storage. But in this mode you can access only the SD card and the ...



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