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7

Got same problem. Here's a fix. Go to the advanced settings by typing "about:config" in the url string, filter settings by "font" substring and change the values of font names corresponding to your codepage from "sans..." (NOT mono) to "Roboto". Restart firefox


7

Prior to Android 4.0 (aka Ice Cream Sandwich) It's called "Droid", and comes in Serif (Regular, Bold, Italic, Bold Italic), Sans (Regular, Bold), and Sans Mono variants. A new font family "Roboto" was released with 4.0. Wikipedia article on Droid (font) Google+ post on Roboto


6

Rooted Phone Android under the folder /system/fonts contains a file named "DroidSansFallback.ttf" supposed to contain all the language characters. Currently it lacks support for many, including Tamil. One can always replace the file with one that contains Tamil characters, thus allowing the usage of Tamil on your phone. From XDA Developers Thread - ...


5

Android stores its fonts at /system/fonts/ using TTF (TrueType) format. If you have a program that can edit TTF files (e.g. FontForge), you can replace the number fonts in these .ttf files with your preferred number fonts to change the glyph used for numbers globally. If you're rooted, you should be able to replace these font files with your own modified ...


5

The app Font Installer will allow you to install a font and set it as the system font. As with anything that modifies a system file, you will need to be rooted to do this.


5

Google recently released Google Hindi IME (Input Method Editor, a techy name for keyboard) which I now saw with my friend's Nexus 4. It has the requested Rupee symbol:


4

I'm not sure about Vietnamese, but for example in Finnish, there are some extended characters that are problematic. This is because some pages are encoded as ISO-8859-15 and some are UTF-8. If autodetection in the browser fails, they will be displayed as boxes or garbage. The same thing happens if the font only supports one encoding and the page uses the ...


4

I notice this annoyance too. Looks like the best solution is to enable volume key text resizing, and leave it enabled. Once you disable it, the Messages app resets the text size to the huge (on the Galaxy Note, that is) font/bubble size. This won't be noticeable on other phones; the real cause is that the GNote is big, which is what all GNote owners like ...


4

I just tried opening "n-category cafe" using Chrome in my Nexus 5, and it works normally. So it's probably just a problem with your browser settings. Check if you are allowing sites to run Javascript by going to Settings -> Site Settings -> Javascipt in your Chrome browser.


3

The Samsung Galaxy Y is a low spec phone and most importantly this can be observed with its display. Some common models in comparison (by resolution, pixel per inch, screen size, price): Galaxy Y: 240x320, 132 PPI, 3.0in, 110EUR Galaxy Ace: 320x480, 165 PPI, 3.5in, 190EUR Galaxy Nexus: 720x1280, 316 PPI, 4.65in, 410EUR The text is blurry because there ...


3

If you are looking for the name of the font you have changed to, you can use the website What the Font.


3

The default font in Android devices is called Droid. I think Droid Sans might be what you are looking for.


3

You can try the browsers that don't use the internal WebKit rendering engine, i.e. Opera Mobile, Firefox, Opera Mini or SkyFire. For Android 2.2 there's also Persian Browser which uses WebKit and connects the letters after loading the page.


3

Unfortunately SAMSUNG has not installed Hindi font on the Indian variant of the Galaxy S. But there is a workaround. For this you will need root access. You can replace the DroidSansFallback.ttf file which is located in /system/fonts/ on your phone with the font mentioned in the first post of this link http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=798380. ...


3

There's NO support for Hindi or any other Indian languages built-in, in all Android versions up to and including FroYo (2.2). Gingerbread (2.3) does support Hindi as a language according to this post If you're looking for a Hindi keyboard, you'll need the HindiIME APK from Samsung - they're usually installed on phones that Samsung sells in India. As a ...


3

Take a look at "Font Size (for root users)" in the market. It costs $1.36 and only works with rooted phones but it claims to: "globally enlarges/decreases text size in all apps (Email, SMS, Maps, Home, Weather, Calendar, Widgets, ...)" The reviews aren't so good but it's worth a try.


3

You are facing this issue because (as @liamwli said) you lack the required font and also possibly because of lack of sufficient libraries in your present ROM. Due to this reason, it is unable to display the file name properly and as a ramification of this issue, different apps behave differently based on how the developer handled this situation. What can ...


3

You could perhaps download a font from the Google play store? I've seen some fonts packs up there. e.g. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.develop.plugin.font&feature=search_result#?t=W251bGwsMSwyLDEsImNvbS5kZXZlbG9wLnBsdWdpbi5mb250Il0. Some of these will more than likely require your device be rooted. Or you can change the size of your ...


3

Yes, you can install new fonts, but it requires root on most devices. To install a font, you just simply need to copy the font file (.ttf format only) into /system/fonts. There are also numerous apps available on the Play store to do this automatically for you, such as the plainly named Font Installer. Other apps also include functionality to find new ...


3

Rendering Tamil characters is a challenge as there is no one glyph to one character mapping as in English. Earlier versions of Android (before 4.1) does not have this support natively. Which means unless the manufacturer or the author of the ROM decides to additional support, Tamil characters cannot be rendered properly. There were few hacks which helped ...


3

As it seems you can access your device via ADB, you should be able to remount /system read/write to repair that file, using adb remount After that, you can copy the intact DroidSans.ttf to /system/fonts, overwriting the 0-byte-file. Following a reboot, /system will be mounted read-only again, and everything should be working. In case that adb remount ...


3

If you are ready to shell out a few bucks then you can buy SwiftKey. It shows the rupee symbol over the key 'X'. Just make sure you set the language of your phone to "English (India)" otherwise you won't get the rupee symbol (link). There is also a trial version of SwiftKey available for one month.


2

Another option ( very restricted, because involves changes in the platform ) is to change the ./frameworks/base/core/java/android/content/res/Configuration.java file. There you must: -Create a setter/getter pair to obtain the font value -Change the point where the file obtain the value. I changed the method public void setToDefaults(){ //I set the ...


2

There's no easy way to do this. Android ships with two fonts: Droid Sans and Droid Serif. They are used for, well, everything. In Ice Cream Sandwich, it also ships with Roboto, a grotesque font similar to Helvetica and Din. This will become less and less of an issue in the future as design-conscious web developers are using @font-face and serving up the ...


2

You can't. And you shouldn't. Samsung's proprietary Touchwiz interface, has the hability to change fonts that are distributed as apk files and can be installed like any other app. I'm not aware of any other manufacturer that integrated this feature into their device. It's also a bad idea to change the fonts. If they have different x-height parts of the ...


2

I think the easiest way would be to find a textarea where you can input big text, and then just take a screenshot and upload it to What the Font. That's probably the easiest way.


2

You appear to be describing issue 4153, a known bug in Android. This issue has been reported as resolved in Jelly Bean. If this screenshot is correct, then the issue should be resolved. (I can't really tell myself, but I do have access to Jelly Bean and can make screenshots from it.)


2

The default appears to be simply what the phone itself is set to use as Font Size under Settings > (Device) Display. Change that to Tiny and your messages will display that way, but obviously everything else on the phone will also be impacted.


2

you will need to install a japanese font onto your device. To do this, you would have to be rooted. Another workaround: See if you can change the system language to Japanese. You may be able to download an app from Google Play that will automatically install the font onto your device.


2

If you are rooted I think the answer of Narayanan said it all; just copy a Japanese font to the system\fonts folder However, if you are unrooted you can install a file explorer app that includes a Japanese font. I did a quick google search and the following file explorers (say that they) support Japanese: Astro File Manager ES File Explorer AndExplorer ...



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