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17

Google and others like Apple and Skyhook build a Database which links WLAN BSSIDs to a geographic location. A BSSID is like the MAC Address of a access point that gets broadcasted by that access point. It is therefore "public viewable" if the BSSID broadcast is enabled, which is the default for most access points. The BSSID operates on a lower layer as the ...


15

If I'm not mistaken it is to access Google's (presumably large) wireless MAC address location database which like Skyhook (a competing service, also previously used on iOS devices) allows a handset to scan for wireless networks nearby and send their MAC addresses (possibly SSIDs as well, I haven't looked into it too depply) off to Google to compare to their ...


15

You might be interested in Assisted GPS Assistance falls into two categories: Information used to more quickly acquire satellites It can supply orbital data or almanac for the GPS satellites to the GPS receiver, enabling the GPS receiver to lock to the satellites more rapidly in some cases. The network can provide precise time. The ...


10

It sounds like Google Latitude does what you want. Once you opt-in you can then share your location data with your wife, and she should be able to check your location anytime. As far as I know, once you choose share your location data with someone they can retrieve it anytime without having to explicitly request your permission. Latitude is built into the ...


9

TL;DR version: Just use the GPS. Long version: Turn on Wifi positioning ("Location & Security > Use wireless network"), turn on GPS ("Location & Security > Use wireless network"), use Google Maps (or other GPS applications), then walk/drive around your city. When you turn on both of these services, before the GPS acquires a "fix", Android will send ...


9

It can if you turn the function on in the settings. In the settings menu there's an option for "GPS", that when checked turns on geotagging: via GSM Arena & CareAce


9

Apps can get your approximate location without GPS, but only if they have the "coarse location" permission. The "fine location" permission lets an app get your GPS location too, if GPS is enabled. When you an install an app, Android shows you the permissions it needs. If you don't see coarse or fine location in the list, the app can't get your location.


8

As long as you have GPS switched on on your phone (on a Galaxy S the easiest way to do this is from the buttons that appear when you pull the notification bar down from the top of the screen) and have GPS switched on in the camera, you should see the "satellite receiver" GPS icon appear and start flashing when you open the camera app. As long as you see this ...


8

There's an app called ALTitude that does allow you to configure those settings per installation (= per device in your case). EDIT: Purpose of the app - updating your Latitude status/location base on more fine grained settings (update interval, location source). ALTitude on Android Market XDA Thread I'd recommend to configure Latitude to "manual location" ...


8

I finally figured out how to do this and thought I would explain (since it is not very obvious). Open up Google Maps or Latitude Click on yourself (the tag that shows your name, last update time, and city) You should be able to click a Location history option With the history open, click the settings button in the lower right corner There are options to ...


7

Google Now by default will think that you're in the USA. The app pulls your home address from Google Latitude. This is also how it knows when you're home and it is the basics for traffic info. To change this go into: Maps -> Location History (tab) Here you can set both your home and work address.


7

Yes, but the application has to request the LOCATION_COARSE permission. This uses a couple different sources used to find the approximate location. Wifi access points: Google tracks the location of access points by gathering information about them when people have GPS on. Then they can use these access points to tell you where you are when you don't ...


6

Yes. I have not tried the WorldCallPlaceAndTime App but it looks like what you want. Below you can see the summary and screenshot from appbrain. EDIT: Based on the comments on appbrain, this app just determines the caller's location based on the phone number's area code. If you want to know the phone's physical location, you'll need to use something like ...


6

It is really up to the developer as to how to implement the location service. The full description is available here: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/location/obtaining-user-location.html The graph about 1/3rd down the page is pretty useful to see what a typical app might do, but again, it is completely up to the app developer. The location ...


5

Here's what I could find so far: Match2Blue for Android enables you to meet new friends and find old ones anywhere, anytime. It takes location- and interest-based mobile social networking to the next level. Search with match2blue for users who have identical or similar interests to yours SinglesAroundMe works to plot singles on a geographical map around ...


5

As Dan insisted in his comment, here as separate answer: Narayanan already mentioned in his answer that each cell tower can be identified via its "CID" (Cell ID), and there are several apps available at Google Play which make use of this. A few examples include: OpenSignal and RF Signal Tracker (source: Google Play; click images for larger variant) ...


4

You can install the application Tasker and use it to always enable GPS when the camera is launched. Enabling GPS for apps that need it is one of the more common uses of Tasker, but it does so much more than that. Here's an article with information: http://lifehacker.com/5599116/how-to-turn-your-android-phone-into-a-fully+automated-superphone


4

A quick search on the Market found a number of these. Here are a few that seem to fit your description. Bus Stop Alarm Bus Snooze - GPS Alarm Location Reminder Alarm GPS Alarm+ GPS Alarm


4

I assume you're referring to the HTC Sense clock widget that appears on the Home screen? It looks like this: If so, it's important to note that the location listed there is indicating what location the weather refers to, not the time. HTC's support site has an explanation of how to work with the widget, including editing settings. It sounds like you ...


4

This video seems to cover it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUV31pKOZcg&feature=player_embedded To recap: Open Camera app Open Menu Tap "Tags" Uncheck Auto-Location tag Done.


4

I'd suggest you try llama. Why because its free and its awesome. It can not only handle ring volume but WiFi, mobile data, run apps and many more. The best thing is it works with Cell Mesh, so you don't have to keep GPS on.


4

Google have a huge database of the approximate locations of a large number of phone network cell towers and wifi access points all around the world. If your phone can "see" one (or more) known cell-tower IDs or Wifi AP SSIDs, then it can query Google's database to ask where that is and use that for your location. The cell network towers have a large range ...


4

As far as I know this is not possible. IMHO, it contradicts Google's incentive to have an as best as possible geolocation service. Some background information: Google maintains a huge database for its geolocation service ("Access coarse location" permission). It consists of: Wifi access point mappings: Wifi MAC address resolve to a geolocation Cell ...


4

Tap the widget so it opens the News & Weather app. Tap the overflow menu and go into Settings. Tap Weather settings Check or uncheck "Use my location" as necessary. Clear out the value under "Set location" as necessary


3

I'd recommend checking out Locale, it's meant for this kind of automation. Or Tasker could work too, and it has a 7-day free trial on the manufacturer's page.


3

Not a complete answer, but some background information: Your device can have more than 1 location provider, e.g. one based on GPS and one based on which mobile phone towers it can see. Android does not have a one single last known position. Each location provider has its own last known position. A location has additional metrics, like accuracy, when it was ...


3

A lot of this is carrier specific and I'm not a dev but heres what I could piece together from the interwebs and the trainings I've had in electronic crime investigation: Yes but it depends on the specific apps LBS priorities which are set by the dev and can be based on current course accuracy, power levels, predefined priorities... Yes. The carriers have ...


3

GPS Essentials app will let you set waypoints of you location, so you could set a waypoint when you take a picture. You could then use software like GeoTag to tag your images on your computer when you get home.


3

I found this from the Google Mobile Help forum after a little searching. It's from 8/15/09 so I actually see something a little different on my phone Settings > Location > Google Location Services. I haven't tested it but hope it helps. Quoting the site: Hi everyone, Apologies for not updating this thread specifically sooner. There is a new version ...


3

Apart from Lie Ryan's great answer above, I think this Wireless Location Bug Form is quite suitable for correcting mislocated Hotspots and as a result for submitting new ones. Has anyone tried this? :) Please use this form if a Google product reported a very incorrect location (e.g. wrong city, state, or country) while your device was connected ...



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