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8

There's an app called ALTitude that does allow you to configure those settings per installation (= per device in your case). EDIT: Purpose of the app - updating your Latitude status/location base on more fine grained settings (update interval, location source). ALTitude on Android Market XDA Thread I'd recommend to configure Latitude to "manual location" ...


8

I finally figured out how to do this and thought I would explain (since it is not very obvious). Open up Google Maps or Latitude Click on yourself (the tag that shows your name, last update time, and city) You should be able to click a Location history option With the history open, click the settings button in the lower right corner There are options to ...


6

From Google's Location Source and Accuracy page: Data sources The following location data sources may be used to derive location: GPS: GPS accuracy can be up to several meters depending on your GPS signal and connection. Your phone must support GPS, have it enabled, and allow Google Maps access to it. WiFi: WiFi (wireless network) ...


6

According to the Google Product Forums with Google Maps for Android 6.10 the Latitude widget is no longer available. You can view your friends' locations quickly by touching the Latitude icon, or by turning on the Latitude layer in Google Maps.


3

OpenGTS provides fleet tracking, and there is a (paid) Android App on the market. Given that it's open source, it's always possible someone (you?) could develop a free app as well.


3

That's most likely not a GPS position, but rather a WiFi hotspot. Google's location service makes use of different identifiers: GPS WiFi hotspots Cell towers While GPS should be quite accurate (bad conditions might give lower accuracy, but usually shouldn't place you too far off), and cell towers usually are not moving -- WiFi hotspots may exactly do ...


3

You can manually set the location using an iGoogle gadget or through Firefox. What you are probably seeing when the location is "one block away" is that GPS is not actually turned on on the handset. The phone is probably using positioning that is determined used cell phone tower location, so it will get you in roughly the correct place, but not the exact ...


3

This is probably overkill and might not even work, but you could root your tablet and install Cyanogenmod, which lets you revoke permissions for individual apps. So you could revoke permission for Latitude to access your location on the tablet, but leave the rest of the app running. This may just cause it to crash, though.


3

If you didn't try this already Latitude has a "Real-time updating" feature since Maps 4.6. To enable this: click on the person you want real-time updates from, on their Latitude profile you should see an option to get "Real-time updating". Click that and you'll get another dialog asking how long you want the real-time update (15, 30, or 60 min). When ...


3

I found this from the Google Mobile Help forum after a little searching. It's from 8/15/09 so I actually see something a little different on my phone Settings > Location > Google Location Services. I haven't tested it but hope it helps. Quoting the site: Hi everyone, Apologies for not updating this thread specifically sooner. There is a new version ...


2

Glympse seems like a good alternative. Just pick who you want to share with, and for how long, and they can follow you on their phones or computers (and they don't need Glympse installed).


2

For the current version of Google Maps (7.2.0) set Settings > Google location settings >Location Reporting> Off on your tablet. For more details see the Google help page. For an older version of Google Maps (6.14.4) I found: Settings > Location settings >Report from this device.


2

If you click on the dots, you will get the time it recorded you there. If it is 35 miles away, and it is within minutes of the previous location, then it would be impossible for you to be there in less than 1/2 hour. I also agree with the others about the Wi-Fi. I was traveling in Michigan this week, and there is one point in Las Vegas that shows up just ...


1

Here's a good, open and decentralized alternative which appeared recently: MQTTitude A Google Latitude replacement based on MQTT MQTTitude enables a device to periodically publish its location status to your MQTT broker. If you've previously used Latitude, you can think of this as a a decentralized Latitude. Summary: Whether you want to keep ...


1

I had the same problem but didn't see the described GUI on my Galaxy S3. So here's how I did it: Opened up Google Maps If on the routes/navigation screen, hit the back button until you return to the default map view with a search bar up top. The search bar should have 2 icons on the right: one for routes/navigation, and one that looks like a user icon. ...


1

If you see "Join Latitude" then your latitude options are already "off". If you also now see "location sharing is not turned on", then your account is not set up to share the location information and it will not be sharing the information. If you don't already, turn off wifi & gps when you are not using them, mpas will be less likely to try and get ...


1

There are a few reasons that immediately pop into my head. Available power plays an important role in whether or not Latitude updates your position. When the battery is fully charged, you will find an insane amount of updates. When the battery power starts to go down, updates become more infrequent. Driving around with the phone plugged in to the cigarette ...


1

Latitude is working fine but I have often observed update delays like you mentioned. There is no way to change the update behavior of the software. On the other hand, Latitude has the advantage of having a low impact on battery life when it is activated. Another solution that lets share location information is Glympse. This software lets you share your ...



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