Hot answers tagged

14

Quoting from XDA (emphasis supplied) Android Instant Apps is an evolution to the way Android has done applications traditionally. Rather than downloading a full-blown application, Instant Apps allows users to “stream” apps to try it out (in reality, it’s a partial code download), without going through the hassle of downloading and installing it So, ...


5

Play store will count Installation or not Definitely won't be count an installation. If Play store will not count then what is the meaning to use it from developer side. What will be benefit to the developer? The key behind Android Instant Apps is that devs won’t have to go back and create a separate version of their app to make this work. All ...


5

There are multiple approaches you could take: a kiosk-mode solution. That would pin the user to a certain app or group of apps defined as "kiosk" parental-control apps, which are often a specific variant of kiosk use an App-Locker The latter most likely is the approach best fitting your current case: You can define which apps should be "locked down" and ...


4

Open Google Play, touch the Menu icon in the upper-left (next to Google Play text), My apps & games, the tab that opens should be called Installed, and anything updating will show an "Update All" button with text in the app description that says "Update".


2

In Android 6.0 permissions have changed from older "all or nothing" approach (where play store prompted you to accept all permissions an app is asking for) to a more granular structure, where the prompt for each permission (e.g. Camera, Contacts, Phone, etc.) appears the first time an app requests it. New or updated apps that were designed with this feature ...


2

You can check the app on AppBrain, which provides an alternative frontend to Google Play. Their app pages a.o. feature a history section. On the example of aCalendar+: App history (source: AppBrain; click image for larger variant) As the screenshot shows, you get a price history along with the changelog (right part) if the app was paid – and you also get ...


1

So it turns out the Google Organisation my Google Account was managed by had Google Payments (formerly Google Wallet) disabled for all users; after enabling it, everything works perfectly.


1

If you are running a custom ROM, you will need to re-flash it along with the corresponding GApps package. If your phone is unmodified stock (beyond rooting) you will need to re-flash the original phone firmware as described in this guide, and optionally re-root it. Quote of the guide from the above mentioned post: *Download wmshua *Download ftf file ...


1

That can be done using AppBrain App Market, an alternative frontend to the Google Play Store. This app a.o. lets you … exclude apps from updates permanently skip specific updates (and only be notified when the next update comes) This way you can exclude stuff from the "batch update" and just have it performed for everything else. You still can update ...


1

It could be either sideloading or installing a version that previously wasn't locked to particular devices, yes. Given that it's available for your other device, it doesn't seem like it would be location-related. APK Mirror is generally the best place to get apps for sideloading, or you could install it on your other device and then copy it off if that ...


1

Is [Remote Application Removal Feature] also effective for apps downloaded from alternative stores? No. Google doesn't care about apps that are downloaded from alternative stores, nor does they have to. Google provides a chance for user to check the application on installation-time (called Package Verifier), but beyond that, it's not Google's ...


1

Unless you're from Google, you can't, and for good reasons why Google prohibits it. I assume you want to do this for better user-experience, in which they can conveniently install what they need with their consent. However, let's put aside that idea and think another possibility: a seemingly-safe app can install rogue apps from Play Store automatically ...


1

Google apps usually require Google Play Services and Framework. If the Google apps have a web interface, then use that in a web browser. Usually, the web interface detects that you are on Android and ask you to load the app. If your browser supports spoofing, that is if you pretend to be using IE/Firefox for desktop, then the redirection will not happen. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible