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129

The Short Answer Theoretically, all devices that meet Android's minimum requirements can run Android, it's just a matter of customizing Android for the device. The Long Answer While Android is open source and can be modified to suit many devices, firmware and hardware drivers are most often not made readily available -- especially not the source code. ...


105

Are you using screen filtering apps? because your screenshot looks red-dim. If yes, disable the screen filter app and it will work again. If you are not using any filtering app, try looking for screen-related apps installed on your phone. This kind of problem mostly related to screen-related apps. Try disable them one by one in your Settings->Apps and find ...


41

The HowToGeek has a set of instructions on how to Run Android on Your Netbook or Desktop here. It uses the Android builds from Android-x86.org but I don't know how active that project still is? However if you just want to try Android out you're probably far better off just using the emulator on your PC.


40

Background Only Android devices that are licensed by the Open Handset Alliance contain the so called Google Apps. Usually people associate apps like Google Maps, Google Play Store, etc. with Android, but because of the open-source nature of Android, manufactures can sell Android devices without Google Apps and therefore avoid to pay the license fee. Custom ...


28

Use DropBox. Put the APK in your DropBox folder. Open up the DropBox app on your phone, find the apk, tap on it, and it should download it to your phone and then install it. Use the SD card. Plug your phone into the computer via USB. Mount the SD card drive. Copy the APK into the SD card. Unmount your phone. Browse to the APK using a file browser app ...


26

Prior to Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) No. Without a custom ROM it's an all-or-nothing affair. Which is part of the reason Google encourages developers to ensure that they're asking for the absolute minimum permissions required for the app to work. Short of getting the app code and modifying it, you either need to accept the access request or not use the app. ...


21

You don't need an external tool for this. On the versions of the Play Store with the new "simplified" permissions dialog, you can still find a full list of permissions from the app's store page (the screen with the icon at the top, description, screenshots, &c.). Scroll down to the bottom of the page. Under "Additional Information" you'll see ...


19

In fact, it is not necessary to install the entire SDK if one does not want to use it for development. To be able to run basic ADB commands in the context needed by an average user, a rudimentary installation is completely sufficient. I will try to explain how to do this, and hopefully cover the most used computer systems. Requirements First, you will need ...


18

Yes: you can connect the phone to your computer via USB, click the notification on your phone to mount the USB storage to the PC, move downloaded apps from your computer to your phone (easiest if you put them on the SD card), and browse on your phone to where you put the apps and click on them to install them. Your phone should have a file browser, but if ...


17

I prefer Google Goggles (available in the Market) for QR scanning to download an app. The most recent version now "sees" the QR and automatically captures it (older version required you to snap the picture before it is processed), then presents a link to the market.


15

CyanogenMod 7 supports this. It activated by going to Settings->CyanogenMod Settings->Applications and checking "Permission management" as of the most recent build. You can then allow and disallow permissions by choosing an app from the app management list (Settings->Applications->Manage applications). There is an article on endgaget with a ...


13

In his answer, Dan already pointed to my list of apps by real-life topics, which offers some extras as well. Currently, it only covers a small subset of what's available on Google Play, though (for some numbers: ~10,000 apps = ~1% of Google Play, including roughly 5% of the apps available in Aptoides (curated) main repository, and a third of the apps ...


12

If your device allows it (AT&T only recently started producing phones that do) there is a setting which allows you to install non-Market apps. Then you can install APKs from anywhere, assuming you can get them on your device. On my Droid, at least, the setting is at Settings | Applications | Unknown sources.


12

Barcode Scanner is the best, you can also create QR Codes to share with others on their website.


12

Another way... Place the .apk file onto your SD card (by using your phone as a mounted drive). Enable applications from unknown sources (go to Settings > Applications > then verify that Unknown Sources is selected). Use an application such as Installer or APK Manager to install the application.


12

Root access (typically) requires several components that work in concert with one another. A somewhat simplified view of what you need is: A native su binary. This can be invoked from the command line or from applications. It is what actually performs the act of switching users, and grants a process root permission. A "gatekeeper" application, that ...


11

I prefer using the ADB. However, It's a little less user friendly. This isn't the easiest way, but it will work without an SD card and will work without the device being internet connected(some devices(tablets) aren't). At the command line you would type: adb install "full-absolute-path-to-apk-here.apk" The "tools" directory of the SDK must be in your ...


11

If you have a 4.x device, the automatic backup/restore found under Settings -> Backup & reset -> Back up my data and Automatic restore options work fine. It uses Google's own servers to save a list of apps installed on your phone. After a factory reset once you sign in with the same Google account, it gives you an option to restore those apps. ...


11

If you have a fastboot-enabled bootloader version (such as the old 0.76.0000 engineering HBOOT in the EVO's case) you can use that to flash it from a PC via USB. Reboot into your bootloader, then select the "Fastboot" option from the boot menu (if it has one, it may start up fastboot automatically). Once it's ready, go to your PC's shell and execute: ...


10

At least on my phone, it seems you need way more available space thanthe size of the app you are actually trying to upgrade. In my case it seems I needed to have at least ~13MB free space to upgrade anything at all (even for 500KB apps). Some tips to free space: Go to Settings, Applications, Manage Applications, click "Move to SD card" on the ones that ...


10

for 99% of devices, you have to have a custom recovery image installed on the device in order to install CyanogenMod. And usually, to do that you have to have the device rooted. So you have to have a rooted device before you can install cyanogenmod. CyanogenMod comes rooted and yes, it is an android release. Rooting a device, while it will void your ...


10

I don't know of a way to do this. I recently bought a new phone, and to save myself the tedium of manually installing 40 odd apps, I went to the Google Play Store using a desktop browser. It will already have a list of apps you have installed under My Apps, so you can quickly spin through the list and install them - you don't need to wait for each app to ...


10

.exe Files are Windows binaries (i.e. executable files/applications/programms) that can not be run natively on a Android system. I am sure the Play Store (or the alternatives of the Play Store) will have an equivalent app to the .exe file you are trying to run.


9

Checkout Bluestacks or GenyMotion


9

Use adb to push them to /system/lib/modules, then reboot. Android should load them at boot as long as they're in that directory, I believe. shell> adb push module.ko /system/lib/modules/ shell> adb reboot If you get a "read-only filesystem" error then remount /system as read/write first, then push them. Usually you can do this with adb remount. You ...


9

Unfortunately Android doesn't offer this functionality out of the box. There are several 3rd-party apps on the Market that can help though. I personally use App Protector Pro on my son's tablet. This app allows you to set a PIN and then set up a "block list" of any installed apps, including system ones. Among other apps, I added Settings and Package ...


9

You can grab the latest .apk on a PC from Mozilla's FTP server and sideload it, as noted on Mozilla's wiki. If you're unsure of how to sideload an app, you can find a variety of methods in How can I install an app given only its APK file? (some require internet connectivity, many do not).



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