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9

Android has "partial" support for IPv6, which basically means there's some code for it but it doesn't really work yet. Check this Google thread for more info.


7

Updating this question to say that as of Android 4.0, IPv6 is fairly well supported. There are still no visual indicators that it is running/working, but devices pick up IPv6 addresses and try to use them by default.


4

You could report the bug to the Android developers, or vote on an existing bug, if there already is one open. This one looks a bit like the issue you are talking about. Make sure you explain exactly what is happening, and how they can reproduce the issue.


2

The title of this post says "6to4 (NAT traversal)". This is fundamentally impossible. It does not work on your standard Linux, let alone Android. The 6to4 protocol relies on having a public IPv4 address on the same machine you terminate the tunnel on. Leaving that aside, it may be that you are simply using the word "6to4" when in fact you mean "IPv6 ...


2

It took a lot of effort but I actually found a working solution to my problem. I first updated my phone to latest available Android version 2.3.6 and that did not solve my problem. So I installed an App that shows me more details about the network setup of my phone. And after some digging around I noticed what was wrong: My phone didn't have a default IPv4 ...


2

No, as of late 2013, even the newest Android devices still don't support IPv6-only WiFi networks. Source: http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=32630


2

Update [2013-04-30]: I believe the reason I am still able to access IPv4 websites, is because of DNS64+NAT64. The public IP address I'm getting from http://myglobalip.com is the public IPv4 interface of the NAT64 gateway. I think the answer to this question is: T-Mobile uses some sort of transitional technology called 464XLAT to provide IPv4 connectivity ...


1

ICS has IPv6 support, but only on mobile data networks; it's somewhere between buggy and nonfunctional on Wi-Fi. Issue 3389 lists a wide variety of Android IPv6 bugs. Your issue is probably among them. I've been using IPv6 successfully on my Verizon Droid RAZR MAXX since I got it almost a year ago, on ICS. Works great on 4G LTE. No idea what Jelly Bean ...


1

Until Google does something about issue 1008, (which seems unlikely since it's about five years old now) you're unlikely to get a better answer, but for what it's worth, this might help someone in a similar situation. At the moment you can't alter the MTU without root access to the device. In Linux this operation requires root, so on Android you either need ...


1

The chipset in the G2/Vision/Desire Z doesn't support IPv6, even though the option appears in the OS and T-Mobile is IPv6 enabled.


1

Digging out an old post but it might be helpful for others: I just wrote a small app called Androiccu that is available in the Google Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ch.web_troubles.androiccu This app allows an easy way to download aiccu (and a complete version of ip, both not ported to Android by me), configure it and finally run ...


1

If your device is rooted go to the terminal after each boot and enter sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.default.use_tempaddr=2 sysctl -w net.ipv6.conf.all.use_tempaddr=2 For automatic activation you could also add these lines to /etc/sysctl.conf net.ipv6.conf.all.use_tempaddr = 2 net.ipv6.conf.default.use_tempaddr = 2



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