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10

Solution 1. Use Tampermonkey. Tampermonkey is more popular as an extension for Chrome, but it is also available as a standalone Android app. It functions as a lightweight browser, and allows you to manage and automatically run user scripts. Unfortunately it doesn't have many of the features found on other popular browsers, but it does support the ...


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Bad news it seems. Bug report on Google code The most relevant post is this: Yes. It is as design. "autoplay" is disabled for Chrome for Android It seems that Android 4+ changed the requirements for the play() method to require user interaction. Article on this issue It's worth nothing that many comments refer to getting it to work with a hack/...


4

Use OilCan - "Greasemonkey on steroids for Android".


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You'll have to copy and paste. I don't know why the long click doesn't work, but I assume because the url doesn't start with "http". I've found the easiest way to create bookmarklets is to do it on the PC and then import the bookmarks, or by copying the text of the js url to a text file, emailing or dropboxing it to my phone and then copying & ...


3

The Javascript engine in Android's Browser/WebView can be either JavaScriptCore (lower end phones) or V8 (higher end phones). Chrome also uses V8. Both engines are written in C++. Javascript is never compiled to Java bytecode, instead it is interpreted and/or JIT compiled into ARM bytecode. My guess on why V8 on PC is much faster than V8 on Android is ...


3

Finally got it to work and it wasn't complicated at all. Simply create a bookmark and paste the javascript into the URL field. I've tried it on this bookmarklet that does a google definition search: javascript: s = (window.getSelection ? window.getSelection() : document.getSelection ? document.getSelection() : document.selection.createRange().text); if (s ...


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There is a Greasemonkey-like add-on for Dolphin called Tampermonkey. There is also a stand-alone Tampermonkey app, but Dolphin is a more full-fledged browser than that thing. There is also a similar add-on for Firefox for Android, called USI.


2

Use either the Habit Browser or Slepnir Browser apps. They both support Userscripts. I had to tweak my scripts slightly to get them working (they handle events differently) but they both work really well.


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AFAIK, the cookies and JavaScript are the features of Browsers which help it render the HTML web page content. Assuming you are using Google Chrome Browser on your Android phone, you can actually enable both cookies and JavaScript through Settings of Google Chrome Browser. Just go to Settings of Google Chrome Browser (Open Google Chrome Browser and click ...


1

HTML5 ServiceWorker seems to support what you need via BackgroundSync / PeriodicSync feature. However, since ServiceWorker is still an ongoing effort, I'm not sure what features are currently implemented in Chrome. I couldn't find any good demoes of this, only proposals: https://github.com/clelland/BackgroundSync/blob/master/explainer.md Cordova has ...


1

This can be turned on/off in Chrome using flags. This is on the user end though and cannot be change in the browser from a website or app. You can also do this in your own app using the api for webview or websettings and make "getMediaPlaybackRequiresUserGesture(false)" it is by default set to "(true)" http://developer.android.com/reference/android/webkit/...


1

As I mentioned in the comments the Twitter app doesn't seen to have an in-app browser so I'm using the Reddit Is Fun app instead since I know it does. I think that all in-app browsing uses a WebView so it should be the same across all apps. The WebView and Chrome both use the WebKit engine but Chrome seems to use a more up-to-date one. I tried out SunSpider ...


1

If the developer do not give you access to the (Web)Settings of the WebView, you will not be able to disable JavaScript in the WebView.


1

This is to prevent page ads fron draining your battery when you're not using the phone (for example), page execution is stopped. As for Opera, I believe they have their own JavaScript engine, so maybe it's not standards-compliant. Or maybe it doesn't interface well with the Android sound system. Or maybe the page's JavaScript isn't standards-compliant.



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