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51

Android shares very little with a typical Linux distribution. In fact, this is where Richard Stallman's "GNU/Linux" distinction comes in handy — Android isn't really a Unix-like general purpose operating system with a Linux kernel. It's a new system which happens to use the Linux kernel. This goes all the way down to its own custom libc implementation ...


27

Both Ubuntu Phone (which is based on the same Linux distro as full Ubuntu) and Android run on a Linux kernel. However they differ above the kernel level, whereas Ubuntu runs a full GNU/Linux OS with most of the standard Linux libraries, and a GUI based on Qt, Android runs a custom Android and Dalvik platform instead. It looks like one of the big benefits of ...


14

The Linux user IDs that Android uses to isolate apps from each other are completely unrelated to user profiles on Android 4.2 tablets. In Android, each app gets its own directory for saving data. The Linux user ID system is used to make sure apps can't read each others' data. But all these data directories are inside one directory on the filesystem, ...


12

Yes there is, Check out the application Better Terminal or Android Terminal Emulator both are support from 1.5


12

The short answer is Yes. The longer answer is... Android uses a modified Linux kernel to run the basic operating system functions. However, Android does not use the same libraries that you would see in a typical desktop Linux system (basic libraries such as glibc), so you can't just run any program on Android that you can on other Linux systems. Besides ...


12

There are quite a few options already: Chroot to a full fledged linux (search for debian chroot android, it's got quite a few hits) There are also native ports of Debian or Ubuntu for some phone/tablet models. Shell access is already there: Terminal Emulator If you install an aftermarket firmware such as CyanogenMod you will get root access, busybox, ...


12

Nexus 7 doesn't support UMS (USB Mass Storage) out of box. But, it supports file transfer by MTP (Media Transfer Protocol). MTP allows you to push and pull any type of files from sdcard, but it doesn't allow you to edit files directly on sdcard (like you do with UMS mode). From your screenshot, it looks like your Nexus 7 is connected with PTP (Photo ...


10

If you have a wireless network set up I can recommend to connect via SSH. It allows you to access and fully manage your Android in a few minutes. For Linux or Putty users there is no difference to a standard terminal using SSH besides some specific Android commands. Moreover, some file managers such as Nautilus support the SSH protocol so you will have the ...


10

Recently I had similar requirement, and I found 'busybox' utility. The terminal emulator apps are useful however those support very few commands. However 'busybox' gave me access to most of the generally used Linux commands. Here is how I used it.


10

Android != GNU/Linux. That is a common misunderstanding. You will never have the same Linux experience like you had with your N900 running debian. Sure, you can install busybox, sshd, maybe rsync and fuse should also be possible. Latex for example, with it's various dependencies will be hard to get running. Mostly because there is no package manager for ...


9

The Wikipedia page on loop devices explains this pretty well. It's basically a "pseudo-device" (i.e. a device which doesn't exist physically) that allows a file to be treated as a block device (for example, a hard drive). You need support for it because the Ubuntu system is stored as a .img file, which is essentially created to be a file representation of a ...


9

Nothing like that exists yet since the apps are not run natively in the OS, but they use Dalvik Virutal Machine instead (Wikipedia). It's somewhat comparable to Java in the sense that it uses bytecode and creates a separated environment for each app. So unless the Dalvik environment is ported to other platforms, they can't be run on normal hardware. There ...


8

The Replicant Project builds tools with every release; you can find their tools here (go down the directory tree in a path like replicant-2.3/preview/0002/tools/), along with notes about which git version was used for the source. Go one directory up and read COPYING for details. Note: They only offer Linux builds. Source code is here.


8

Android does not include a telnet daemon. Use the included android debug bridge (meant for development or power users). It comes with the official SDK ( http://developer.android.com/sdk/ ). Install both "tools" packages Enable USB debugging in your phone settings run ./platform-tools/adb shell in yor sdk folder (needs approprate USB rights for your phone) ...


8

Most shell commands in Android are not GNU versions or another POSIX-compliant implementation, they are either from Toolbox or Busybox and mostly stripped down versions. A lot of commands in /system/bin are symlinks to /system/toolbox. I haven't found much documentation about it, just the source at ...


7

Ubuntu has built Ubuntu One Mobile for that very purpose. The service is free to try for one month, then $3.99/month (or $39.99 yearly). It's worth mentioning that the paid account gives you 25GB of storage and unlimited streaming for devices running Android 2.1+, iOS 3.1+ as well as Windows XP, Vista and 7 (and there are rates for additional storage). (For ...


7

"Rooting" allows you access to the internal Android environment, which of course consists of more than just the Linux kernel. So you are running Linux, but you should consider it as though you are running under a different distribution than say Debian or Redhat. There's a different set of standard libraries and some files are in different locations. At ...


7

The following works for a while, but only for the browser. When you plug in your phone via usb and choose Internet pass-through, you should get a new RNDIS device (usb0 or usb1). For ubuntu, edit /etc/network/interfaces and add the following lines: iface usb0 inet dhcp iface usb1 inet dhcp This will assign an IP automatically when the device is added. If ...


6

The Scripting Layer for Android also includes a shell.


6

Reason is your client saves them at that time, and doesn't ask the "server" (your Android device) for the original time stamps. You could try using a SSH server on your Android device. DroidSSHd would be a good choice, for example. To copy your files then you need to start this SSH Server first on your phone, which usually tells you the IP and port used. ...


6

Another way is to simply go to Settings→About phone, where you should see (depending on your CyanogenMod version) an item "CyanogenMod updates", and (with all CM versions) "CyanogenMod-Version":


6

Izzy’s answer is misleading. Two unrelated things were mixed up (the vendor ID list in adb on one side and the permission setup in Linux on the other side). 1) devices considered by adb: Adb has a hard-coded list of USB vendor IDs it tries. E.g. HTC mobile phones use 0xbb4, which is listed (source file usb_vendors.c), while 0x2207 is not. The only way to ...


6

Chor WaiChun mentioned this on a locked question you posted on StackOverflow: I've seen somewhere stated that this behaviour is because both android and linux run on same kernel, and same situation goes to developing android on mac. Both OS runs in very similar OS kernel with Android, that is why they don't need any drivers. These are just ...


6

Android runs the Linux Kernel for the core system and it can be (and is) optimized for various platforms (compiled for ARM, x86, x64, PPC, etc). Here is a fantastic graphic to demonstrate this for you: Source: Post on Unix.SE Android relies on Linux version 2.6 for core system services such as security, memory management, process management, ...


6

In short, it's because of the different ways that Android and MS Windows are distributed. MS Windows is a retail product, sold directly to PC owners. Therefore, Microsoft is responsible for making it run on PCs. PCs are standardized, and (nowadays) have a hardware-discovery mechanism, so Microsoft can design the Windows installer so that it can run on any ...


5

Android 2.1 (Eclair) Plug in your phone Pull the notification bar; tap on "USB connected (Select to copy files to/from your computer)". Tap "Mount". Ubuntu should autoprompt you to browse the phone using File Manager (Nautilus) Android 2.2 (Froyo) (and probably Android 2.3) Plug in your phone Android should autoprompt you to enable USB Mass Storage. ...


5

Going through the Galaxy S Flash/Root/ADB/ROM guide on XDA, I just spotted this: I'm running Linux/OSX. Can I still flash my firmware? Do I need to install windows? If you are running Linux you do not need to install Windows. You can either run Odin in a virtual machine or alternatively use Heimdall by Benjamin Dobell. Heimdall ...


5

There's QtADB which uses adb. You can also install an SSH or ftp server on the phone and then use Nautilus with ssh://ip-or-name-of-your-phone/ or ftp://ip-or-name-of-your-phone/ URLs (you can create bookmarks in Nautilus). The cool thing about a standard SSH or ftp server on your phone is that you don't have to install anything special on the computer. I ...



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