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19

You can either download the SDK and use adb logcat or get aLogcat from the Market, which shows the log directly on your phone. Jelly Bean With Android 4.1 (aka Jelly Bean) the full system log is only visible if you have root. Apps can only see their own log messages. For more information view see this question.


14

Log-File locations There are several directories where logs (including those from crashes) might appear -- not all of them are standardized (i.e. some may be ROM-specific). /data/anr: Some trace files seem to get here (Dalvik writes stack traces here on ANR, i.e. "Application Not Responding" aka "Force-Close"; see e.g. log excerpts here) /data/dontpanic ...


13

These free apps in the Market claim to be able to display your logcat, and don't make any mention of root. Should only take you a few minutes to try them out: CatLog aLogcat LogViewer EDIT: Thanks to @mente for reminding me that these apps will only let you view the full logfile in older versions of Android. Android 4.1 brought in a new security model ...


10

I think you have caught yourself out, in short, nothing you can do! Have a look at this source that explains why, specifically in this section: System Partition and Safe Mode The system partition contains Android's kernel as well as the operating system libraries, application runtime, application framework, and applications. This partition is set ...


9

A found that CatLog displays the Android log a little bit better then aLogcat. Besides adb logcat, that's what I am using.


9

Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can see the full text of the errors which are occurring when trying to sync my K9 folders? It seems that there is no way to see these log messages on the device without root access, but if you do have root access, there are a couple of options, either grant the required permissions to aLogcat or consider ...


8

No, for security reasons it is not possible to access android log files on the Nexus 7 (or any other device running Jelly Bean or higher) without root access. Google changed that with Jelly Bean. I'd suggest you wait until logcat readers like aLogCat and such get fixed (i.e. they will require root access to show all logs then). From ...


7

/data/system/dropbox is not part of "DropBox" it is part of the Android OS DropBoxManager (not related at all to "DropBox"). This puts data from application crashes and kernel logs and such in this log directory. I know the market uses this directory(See #4) as well, probably to report application crashes. You could probably remove the data in this ...


6

Sniffing the network traffic would require root for the app that does the sniffing part. This can easily be done with "shark for root". But you won't get any end-user friendly information, just the raw packet data that's been send and received from your phone. That information needs to be matched to a particular app and action (e.g. app xy is uploading photo ...


5

Not very active if you use apps like aLogcat. The permissions system regarding to logs was changed with Jelly Bean: The permission to read logs "READ_LOGS" is now systemOrSignature, which means that an app that is not signed with the ROM/system key can only view its own log. You can still view the full android log with adb logcat from the SDK. I think that ...


5

If you want sane information, I recommend sane commands :) (no offense meant, just kidding). So the question should read: How to obtain log information from an Android device? And now we are on the better side. There are multiple approaches which can be used: utilize apps to display (color-coded) log information utilize ADB (part of the Android SDK) to ...


5

I googled the file name and found this post on XDA: i'm still having the storage is running out error from 3.8. I found out it was caused by the signal lost issue because inside the log folder located in data folder, it will generate many dumpstate ril reset by........xxx..once my signal is lost. so, i'm wondering what's the best worldwide modem ...


4

Well it starts because that's how dev coded it. You can try programs like startup manager that will kill the program once it starts.


4

You don't need to root your phone to run adb logcat with the Android SDK, but I did just test it in my Terminal Emulator and I did have to be root (used the su command -- my phone is already rooted) to run logcat in the terminal on my phone. So yes: if you have root on your phone you can run logcat from a terminal on your phone.


4

The only log I remember, that contains installation success/failure info is the one that can be accessed via ADB (android debug bridge). The command is: adb logcat But you might not have the Android debugging tools installed, so an easy way of looking at the logcat is to install aLogcat from market. Because that log is a memory buffer (I learned it form ...


4

If you are using LogCat viewer in Eclipse you can click the "Scroll Lock" button to prevent it from automatically scrolling down. It is the icon on the top right in the screenshot above.


4

Windows Its easier, what you can do is this, from the cmd window, adb logcat > my_logcat.txt and just let it run, now, you can pause, resume the scrolling, in that cmd window, same keystrokes for Linux terminal, IIRC, now launch an editor and open the file 'my_logcat.txt' and there the results will show, had there not being a pause/resume in the cmd ...


4

Ok, found the answer here When you start the update process it loads that screen with the android character and the yellow progress bar, as soon as that screen shows up press both vol up and vol down at the same time and it will switch to verbose mode where it will show each step of the install process. When it fails it will typically display a directory ...


3

The ROM might call "rm /dev/log/main" during init to cripple logcat. If you can find that line and remove it logcat should be happy.


3

You can run tcpdump on the background(compiled for Android processor of course) in a shell, save the captured file and analyze later with wireshark on your pc. That solution will not tell you what application sent the data, but enables you to examine what your phone sends and where. The great benefit is tcpdump under normal situations does not consume many ...


3

Use the phone information dial code if it works. In your dialer enter *#*#4636#*#* to get to the phone info screen. On my Spica running 2.1 Eclair, the last option of USAGE STATISTICS shows the usage time (in milliseconds) and the no. of times an app has been launched. At first glance, it does however seem to be a log restricted from the time the phone ...


3

Logs are written even when logcat is not connected, although I believe the logs are limited to a certain maximum size. They are, however, cleared on reboot. You can try using an app such as aLogCat to persist the logs to files, and hope it can catch whatever is misbehaving "in the act".


3

To find out the actual size of the ring buffer, you can use $ adb logcat -g To adjust the size of the ring buffer, you might try $ adb logcat -r <kbytes> At least that's what some tutorials say. For more details, you might want to read "adb logcat" Command Options and Log Buffers. P.S.: I guess those settings (manual adjusted ring buffer size) ...


3

If you're looking to change the default size for a log buffer, to persist between reboots, you can recompile the kernel with updated buffer sizes. The file containing log buffer definitions is: <kernel>/drivers/staging/android/logger.c The versions I'm looking at use a macro to define log buffers in that file: DEFINE_LOGGER_DEVICE(variable, name, ...


3

You might be able to get some of what you want from Carat. This app is a project from UC-Berkeley to measure what's using your battery and how your battery life compares to other people's devices. It doesn't directly measure CPU, but your resource hogs are going to use more battery by implication. From the description: Carat will tell you which apps it ...


3

If you as a user experience such crashes, and want to help the developer to get them fixed, you can use tools such as aLogcat (free) - logcat or Bug Reporter to catch a log of what happened: While aLogCat allows you to restrict the log closer to the crash event (by letting you define what to capture), Bug Reporter enables you to send other useful ...


3

For information about seeing log messages, look at the answers to How can I view and examine the Android log? Note that the behaviour is different between 4.1-jelly-bean and prior versions. Android users don't work like users on a normal GNU/Linux system, so unlocking the lock screen is not a "login" in the same way that logging into a terminal session, ...


3

You can use filtering to include only the selected app's messages by the tag(s) used. Use the syntax adb logcat YourTag:I *:S to show logcat output only from YourTag and hide all others. You can have multiple tags also, just separate them with space and have the *:S entry as last. If you need to get all messages from multiple tags in the same app, you have ...


2

If you want to examine the log outside the environment of your phone, there is the application LogCollector. It's free and it allows you to send/upload the log to/with the program of your choice. I just send the log via gmail to my home email account. It is always easier to read such log files on your pc screen, compared to reading it with whatever ...


2

One way to do this would be with Evernote. You could organize it all sorts of different ways (eg. Organize companies by tag or by notebook... and a new note for each interaction...) and you can attach files (photos, pdf, voice memos...) to each note. As far as recording the actual calls, as Matthew Read suggested, take a look at this question. If you are ...



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