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You can modify the network config to set a specific DNS value. Find the WiFi network you are connected to, press and hold on the name of the netowrk->Modify Network Config->Show Advanced Options. From here you can set a specific DNS, after changing the IP Settings to static. I believe that most devices look at the DHCP for a DNS server, with a google IP ...


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There's a slight syntax error in your statement: the first non-option parameter to su (which stands for "Switch User") is the user to switch to (if omitted, root is assumed). So your su netcfg usb0 dhcp basically advises su to "switch to the user netcfg – but there is no such user. To fix it up, just use su -c "netcfg usb0 dhcp" – which would, due to the ...


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There are plenty of way to fix this problem, you can see them all at: http://cocland.com/tutorials/how-to-fix-clash-of-clans-crashes-android


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Android reverse tethering steps: Note: Works only in a rooted Android phone. Connect Android device via USB. Enable USB tethering. To do so, go to Settings → More... → Tethering & mobile hotspot → Usb tethering. On host machine, type: $ ifconfig usb0 10.42.0.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 $ echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward ...


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[From Comments:] If you're looking to connect the two via IP networking they'll need to be in the same subnet. Your PC is self-assigning an IP address because it can't find a DHCP server. Try statically assigning your PC 192.168.1.1 with the same 255.255.255.0 subnet.


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I think reverse tethering would solve your problem. Android reverse tethering steps: Note: Works only in a rooted Android phone. Connect Android device via USB. Enable USB tethering. To do so, go to Settings → More... → Tethering & mobile hotspot → Usb tethering. On host machine, type: $ ifconfig usb0 10.42.0.1 netmask ...


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just type netcfg it will lists the interface, and work on any terminal emulator. running on the phone itself, or remotely via adb.


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What Dan Hulme said is possibly the best advise for a solution IMO. Anyhow, if you can afford to root the device, then go ahead and do it, and install SuperSU, Busybox and AFwall+. AFwall+ is a firewall which requires some binaries available via former app. Launch SuperSU and create a PIN/password in the Settings. This might require Pro version. -- this is ...


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You can use netstat -tcp and that will show you all open TCP connections. EDIT Per your comment, you can use busybox (a very handy app you can download from the Play store) and then you can run: busybox netstat -nat to show what you need. -Reference: linuxquestions



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