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84

The Short Answer Theoretically, all devices that meet Android's minimum requirements can run Android, it's just a matter of customizing Android for the device. The Long Answer While Android is open source and can be modified to suit many devices, firmware and hardware drivers are most often not made readily available -- especially not the source code. ...


28

The effect you are describing is not caused by the OS. It's caused by more and more background processes that accumulate over time and maybe more apps registering to system hooks that need to be evaluated when certain events occur. Every OS that supports this will be vulnerable. My Android has run for the past 1 1/2 years without any performance ...


27

Both Ubuntu Phone (which is based on the same Linux distro as full Ubuntu) and Android run on a Linux kernel. However they differ above the kernel level, whereas Ubuntu runs a full GNU/Linux OS with most of the standard Linux libraries, and a GUI based on Qt, Android runs a custom Android and Dalvik platform instead. It looks like one of the big benefits of ...


18

The su binary needs both the execution and the setuid permission bit set. The first is needed that the file can be executed and the second is that it automatically runs with the file owner's rights (set user id, or setuid. In this case the owner is root. Read more here). Files on the external storage don't have the executable and setuid permission bits set ...


7

http://www.android-x86.org/ This is the only android distribution for Intel/AMD processors that I am aware of. It has little support, but is actively maintained. The latest version is a release candidate for Android 2.3. Obviously hardware support is hit and miss. For what it's worth it runs very well on my EEE PC. You can install the ISO to a USB drive ...


6

Is a different version of the recovery really needed for different OS versions? No. In case of updating custom roms you're completely right in that the recovery is mostly* independent of the rom used. However phone manufacturers sometimes push out updates that change some vital parts of the phone. For example repartition the phone. This is why sometimes ...


6

The "Hardware Backed Credential Storage" aka "Android Key Store" is only hardware backed when the hardware on the device has the necessary hardware components in it. When there isn't the necessary hardware available it falls back to software storage. Android also now supports hardware-backed storage for your KeyChain credentials, providing more ...


6

As mentioned on it's Wikipedia page, Android's core is developed in C and C++, and Java is used for the UI. You can see this for yourself if you browse the Android source code. For example, omapzoom.org provides the source for browsing without the need to downloads gigabytes of data.


5

As I stated in the Comments, version 2.3.4 is the latest version for phones. Versions 3.0, 3.1, and 3.2 are all for tablet devices. Version 4.0 will be released on the Galaxy Nexus sometime this month. Version 4.0 (code named Ice Cream Sandwich) was designed to run on both phones and tablets which may clear up the confusion surrounding the numbered releases. ...


5

You receive updates from the carrier. You can circumvent this by rooting your phone and installing a custom rom (or stock rom, if available) to get the latest version of Android.


5

You can simply go the Service menu of your phone and see the total call time which is very hard to reset. By that, you can assume how long it has been used. With the current features of Android, that is the best you can get.


5

Technically, you are not allowed to "install Gapps manually" unless your phone already comes with them pre-installed. The Google Apps package (that includes Google Play Services, Play Store, and several other apps) is Google's intellectual property, and nobody is allowed to distribute it, except for Google's certified partners that have passed CTS. For ...


4

I assume from your posting that resetting the phone fixed the problem (temporarily). If you want the problem fixed for good, you can help by trying to narrow down the problem further. This will allow you to address the right people with a very specific request of what needs to be fixed. You should: Try to reproduce the problem. Install the apps you ...


4

The short answer is that the Nexus phones are the most updateable - not only do they get more updates then the other phones, but they also get more support from the community in general. Case in point, though Google has announced that the Nexus One will not get ICS, CyanogenMod will be providing it. Other then the Nexus phones, I think it is best to stick ...


4

In practical terms, there are no Android phones that support other popular operating systems, because the other OSs are closed source. A possible exception is, for example, the HTC HD2; it's almost identical to the HTC Desire Z, and Android can be run on it, so it's entirely possible that ripping the WinPhone7 OS and flashing it on a Desire Z would work. ...


4

You probably have to use ODIN. I've done it myself, and it worked for me. I used it to root my phone (SGS2). I've postponed it for months, afraid it would brick my phone, but it didn't. Make a backup of all important data. Find a good manual on Youtube, XDA-developers or via Google. Compare them, and see what they say. Be prepared that it can go wrong. ...


4

Yes and No. There are Nexus/Google devices that are nevertheless branded by the carrier and therefore receive a different ROM then the stock ROM. This usually takes longer then the stock ROM. But yes, besides of that, the Google manufactured branded devices are the only ones who receive the updates directly from Google. All other devices get their updates ...


4

Most after-market ROMs ship without Google Apps by default. Take a look at e.g. CyanogenMod, which is available for many devices. So if you can install custom ROMs, that's one way to go. A different approach would be disabling all Google apps, or even remove them (on a rooted device). This might be a little more tricky as you would have to figure out all ...


4

Just because something is technically possible, that doesn't mean that it will happen. A large company needs a good financial reason to do something expensive like porting a new OS to their devices. And even if there is a financial reason to do it, they may still be stopped for political reasons. In this case the political reason is the overwhelming reason ...


3

Yes it's possible to dual boot Android and Windows Mobile or dual boot multiple different Android ROMs or dual boot Android and WebOS.


3

Power management is determined by governors which set the CPU clock speed according to use. Each clock speed operates at a certain voltage and a lower voltage means less power. If you have root access you can change the governor and the allowed CPU clock speeds. Also there is sleep state into which the CPU will enter when the screen is off and nothing is ...


3

I think the Omnia 2 is a Windows phone normally? So it is very unlikely to have an official Android release for it. You're going to have to wait for someone to put together an unofficial release and hope that it's possible for them to get or write all the drivers, etc. It looks like there was an attempt by some of the XDA people to port Android to the i8000 ...


3

Similar to this question which asks about 2.2.1, there don't seem to be any real "changelogs" made available for Android updates. However, you can look at their git repository to see the commit log. Here's the shortlog for the 2.3.4_r1 tag. The summary: mostly bugfixes, and the addition of video/voice chat for the Google Talk app. Apparently this is only ...


3

Answer by Flow is correct in that the increased feeling of sluggishness is not caused by the OS, it is mainly caused by apps. But there is another effect I noticed, specially on battery life: The more you use your phone, the more you are demanding to its performance (and battery life), even if it is not conscious. (It is the same for hard-drive sizes: the ...


3

If you are using an alternative ROM to Android, it is possible there could be issues with the ROM which might be causing it. Issues like this have been seen on CyanogenMod ROMS in the past, especially on nightly builds (that is, test versions). However, they are correct in that it is more than likely due to apps you have downloaded. I have gone without ...


3

Rooting involves exploiting the weakness depending on the android version, hence "jump through all of the hoops to root the phone" Its a chicken-and-egg! In order to exploit root, you need a unsecured adb daemon (i.e. the capability to remount /system) on the handset, and in order to have an unsecured adb, you need root! AND also, you need a unlocked ...


3

As you told in question itself, Android is Linux based. So obviously the core is developed using C. On top of this, Java is used for UI (ie: Android).


3

a media server, using e.g. BubbleUPnP a machine for development/coding, using e.g. Terminal IDE a "picture frame" (before mentioned BubbleUPnP should be able to do that along, but many gallery apps in slideshow-mode as well) a web server, e.g. with AndroPHP / Bit Web Server (PHP,MySQL,PMA) / Ulti Server: PHP, MySQL, PMA – also see: Turn a Android Phone with ...


3

Given that you and your friend both have the same tablet, this should be possible. Your friend will need to be rooted as well. Probably the easiest thing would be for him to perform a Nandroid backup which you then transfer to your tablet and restore. If this works, your tablet will be in the same state as his at the time he flashed, so you'll need to ...


3

All computers have a special piece of hardware called the clock (more fully, the real-time clock or RTC). The clock is connected to the CPU, but it runs even when the computer is completely powered down. On a desktop computer, a battery on the motherboard keeps the clock running even when it's unplugged from the mains. Mobile devices tend to have a large ...



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