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23

The Chrome page in the app store says this about the new permissions: This version requests two new permissions, Camera and Modify Audio Settings, to support WebRTC, an experimental feature under development. WebRTC itself is designed to expose your camera and mic to the browser, so that web-apps can implement video-conferencing and other multimedia ...


22

Android has a centralized system for managing credentials for online services (such as your Google account). One component is called the AccountManager. Some apps can "act as an account authenticator". This means that they understand how to log into a particular online service, and can log in to that service for the AccountManager. Other apps want to use ...


19

Prior to Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) No. Without a custom ROM it's an all-or-nothing affair. Which is part of the reason Google encourages developers to ensure that they're asking for the absolute minimum permissions required for the app to work. Short of getting the app code and modifying it, you either need to accept the access request or not use the app. ...


19

You don't need an external tool for this. On the versions of the Play Store with the new "simplified" permissions dialog, you can still find a full list of permissions from the app's store page (the screen with the icon at the top, description, screenshots, &c.). Scroll down to the bottom of the page. Under "Additional Information" you'll see ...


18

Usually apps require internet access for ads, analytical data, or for sending bug reports/stack traces back to the developer. Other reasons might include using Google's licensing servers to validate legitimate copies of apps with Android market purchases (Google's licensing servers use the CHECK_LICENSE permission). Similarly, some developers produce their ...


17

Once upon a time, there is a walled city with a large, closed gate bound by magical lock that can only be opened with a magical sword. According to the cityfolk's traditions, anyone who brings the magic sword and unlocked the magical gate is destined to be the lord of the city. One day, a young hero comes to the city, bringing with him the magical sword he ...


15

Whisper Systems has come out with a custom ROM that has this exact feature: http://www.whispersys.com/permissions.html. As DarthNoodles mentions, it has to be done at the system level rather than the app level, which is how it is implemented in WhisperCore. The current version isn't able to block all of the permissions available on Android, but they are ...


15

How it currently CAN be done During my morning routine reading my RSS feeds, I stumbled on a review at N-Droid, discussing an app named APEFS. This app is developed by German students (hence its description on the Playstore is in German, even if you set the language to English). But for our non-German readers, a short description here: Basically, APEFS is ...


14

In short, GitHub is using the internal Account System manager to store your GitHub credentials. This works the exact same was as adding a Google account or an Exchange account. Essentially, you are logging in with your credentials and they are stored in the Account Manager, which prevents you from having to re-enter these credentials again in the future. ...


14

Found an answer to my own question! Might as well share how I did it (DO IT AT YOUR OWN RISK, it worked fine for me). Needs root obviously. Using a root-enabled file manager, navigate to /system/etc/permissions Edit platform.xml and find the WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE permission. Add an additional group definition for this permission...<group gid="media_rw" ...


13

CyanogenMod 7 supports this. It activated by going to Settings->CyanogenMod Settings->Applications and checking "Permission management" as of the most recent build. You can then allow and disallow permissions by choosing an app from the app management list (Settings->Applications->Manage applications). There is an article on endgaget with a ...


12

This question has been bothering me quite some time. So now, finally, I decided to get to the bottom of the issue. The Playstore has an app named permission.READ_PHONE_STATE, which requests READ_PHONE_STATE as the only permission, and does nothing else than printing out all data it can access with or without using it. I've installed that on my LG Optimus ...


12

This is all the available permissions that an application can require. Of this list, there are some that can only be "requested" by "System" applications. Applications that are not system applications will not be able to request permissions to "System Permissions". Only applications that are in the /system/app location and signed with the System key can ...


12

In his answer, Dan already pointed to my list of apps by real-life topics, which offers some extras as well. Currently, it only covers a small subset of what's available on Google Play, though (for some numbers: ~10,000 apps = ~1% of Google Play, including roughly 5% of the apps available in Aptoides (curated) main repository, and a third of the apps ...


11

CyanogenMod 7.1 has exactly this feature, but without faking data, only failing, if the app accesses the API. Proposition for faking the IMEI was rejected. Faking other data, like contacts, is currently under discussion.


11

Why currently  this can't be done When a developer performs the upload of his application to Google Play, the application manifest file gets read to a database, from where the search for apps is performed. To allow searching for applications based on their permissions, one would have to access the database and collect data that concerns the ...


11

There is always the possibility of a vulnerability in some app that could cause your computer/phone to be hacked. Browsers are notorious for having bugs that allow the computer to be infected with a virus simply by viewing a page. In fact, one method to jailbreak an early Apple iOS device was to simply browse to a page that delivered a payload via a bug in ...


11

General information You might want to take a look at What do the permissions that applications require mean? -- our "community wiki" which hopefully becomes such a ressource one day. Next to that, you might want to take a look at App Permissions Explained – What Do They Really Mean?, a blog article at AndroidPIT giving at least some short explanations. ...


11

Yes, it can, but only on Android 4.3 and lower. This is used for example in Whatsapp. When you activate the app, Whatsapp sends an SMS to the number you reported, and the app intercepts it quietly and reports to the servers that it has received the SMS. This is how the account is tied to your number. Of course, this can be used in harmful apps also. If an ...


10

Use market applications like Permission Watchdog or Permissions. Also, there are several others.


10

The permissions are entered by the developer, yes. But the Android OS only grants those specific permissions, and no others. Therefore an app could try to do something it wasn't allowed to, but it would fail (barring a security exploit). See http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/security/security.html#permissions for more details.


9

Many ad publishers use this permission to get the Phone ID for all sorts of tracking purposes. There are other ways to get a unique ID, but unfortunately they are buggy in older Android versions (the story is more complicated, see e.g. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2785485/is-there-a-unique-android-device-id or ...


9

Android apps can only send SMS if they have the SEND_SMS permission, there are a few permission viewers on the market: S2 Permission Checker Permission Viewer to prevent installing rogue applications, you might want to be more cautious when installing applications and check their permissions they required before installing. If you install apps from the ...


9

As Goggles is an app that you've said you're curious about, here are the permissions it asks for(copied from the Market web page): This application has access to the following: Your accounts Google App Engine Allows applications to sign in to Google App Engine using the account(s) stored on this phone. access other Google services Allows ...


7

There is a Privacy Blocker (paid) and Privacy Inspector (free) applications. Privacy Blocker does a static analysis of applications for sensitive API calls and rewrites these calls into stub ones which return fake data. As a result a new .apk with rewritten application is generated and installed. Privacy Inspector is an app which only reports the use of ...


7

There is an App Shield application. It essentially repackages .apk with permissions removed from manifest. Brilliant idea for stock, non rooted phones. Subject to crashes (force closes), though, as with current CyanogenMod approach.


7

Not an absolute solution to your problem, but there is an app in the android market which caters to your needs. It also necessarily requires better knowledge about permissions and also a rooted device. Permissions Denied is an app which allows you to effectively control the permissions that apps which are installed onto your phone, via the market or some ...



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