Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Setting this option forces Android to stop each process as soon as it is empty (that is, when no services are started and no activities are on screen for that app). To be clear: this option won't stop apps that would normally run in the background from doing so. Your mail client will still run periodically to check mail, if it's configured to do that. Apps ...


6

Neither DVM nor JVM runs on every processes. Natively compiled applications (e.g. the ones you see inside Terminal Emulator) are not associated with any DVM or JVM. And even when you only count Android "apk" applications, the overhead of having JVM/DVM on (nearly) every process' address space is minimal since they are a shared dynamic library so Linux will ...


6

The numbers in "app_XYZ" name will be different on every device, since they depend on the order of installed apps. In adb shell or terminal emulator perform the following command: ls -l /data/data/ This should return a listing of installed apps' directories that contain their data and settings, like so: drwxr-x--x app_1 app_1 2012-03-28 ...


6

This could be a solution, but it's more a hint at the issue: The ZTE Blade suffers with losing it's Wi-Fi connection when it comes back from sleep. Perhaps you have a similar issue? The app Blade Wifi Fix by AA Android available from Google Play Store, fixes it on the Blade, you could give it a try: Some people with the ZTE Blade / Orange San Francisco ...


5

Cyanogenmod ROMs has a feature that by LONG pressing the BACK button you can kill the running process.


5

There are quite a few apps that can show the PID of running apps and services. One which I use to find a lot of info about what's going on in my phone is the Android System Info app, you can see the PIDs of some built-in services in this screenshot:


5

AFAIK, you can't. But, you can customise when to kill background apps (not selective app) by tweaking MinFree values set by Android (root is required for tweaking). If you have problems dealing with it, there are many apps in Play Store for that. My fav is AutoKiller Memory Optimizer. And, when foreground app and/or kernel runs out of memory, killing ...


4

Taking Google's Music app as an example (I would wager most others are implemented similarly), there are two distinct parts that constitute the app: The foreground processes and tasks that the user interacts with The background service that actually handles music playback Point 2 can be verified in this Android Developer's blog post wherein it is stated: ...


4

Android applications run Dalvik bytecode, so the DVM needs to be running. Just like how running Java bytecode on a PC requires a JVM to run.


4

One part of Google Maps is a so called "Location Service", which kicks in on a couple of intents (e.g. always when your network connectivity changes -- which happens when you login to a new WiFi network, or to a new cell tower). It caches your current location to the "location cache", which should serve to faster provide your current location when needed ...


3

Your suggested approach would have the same result: a few seconds later, the app would be back. Tasker kills it again. Start at the beginning. This vicious circle will certainly help you drain your battery faster -- but nothing else. Two possible solutions would include either to uninstrall the app, or to disable the "listener" it established to get started ...


3

When you leave an app that was running in the screen, it stops running, but Android keeps its process in memory. This means that next time you want that app in the foreground, or next time it runs a service in the background (e.g. to check for email), the app can run again without Android having to load it from storage again. This means it starts faster and ...


2

Autostarts parses the application manifests. That's really the best way. (There is a seemingly auto-generated broadcast_actions.txt file shipped with the Android SDK, but it's not complete, in my experience). Depending on what is wanted, you need to consider: That apps can broadcast custom events, and other apps may listen to those custom events. That ...


2

According to several other similar questions on stackoverflow, such a list is not available via APIs. I'm not sure how apps like Tasker produce such lists. I wouldn't rule out iterating through all possible intents via the queryIntentActivities() function, or even parsing each installed app's manifest file.


2

In Settings / Location settings, uncheck "Report from this device". Make also sure to disable Google Now. Seems to do the trick with Maps 6.14.1 on JB 4.1.2.


2

Applications normally store their data in /data/data/com.foo.bar but you won't have access to that via adb on an unrooted device, by design. I don't think there's a way around that without rooting the phone.


2

I think Google Play is bundled with some services that requires for another applications. ie : Applications that uses Google Cloud Messaging (GCM). According to this link: http://developer.android.com/guide/google/gcm/gcm.html GCM requires devices running Android 2.2 or higher that also have the Google Play Store application installed.... So ...


2

That's a really silly thing to do. Android will automatically kill background processes to make more RAM available when necessary. Most of the time it leaves background processes in RAM (but not running) to allow those apps to start up quicker next time, and to use less power (because it doesn't have to keep reloading the app into RAM). See the answers to ...


2

There's no simple answer to the question, "Why do programs crash sometimes?" The error message you see tells you that an app has crashed, just like when a program crashes on a desktop computer. Usually this indicates a bug (programming error) in the app or in one of the libraries included in the app (e.g. an ad network, or a library for accessing a ...


2

If you are rooted, I would recommend downloading Better Battery Stats (or Wakelock Detector) from the Google Play Store, and finding the name of the 'mad' processes. If you aren't rooted, I recommend you root as other apps can't access battery stats as of Android OS version 4.4.


2

It's understandable that your battery life will decrease when you run 4.4 on an older device like the S2. But that is strange. Try identifying the process like the other users suggested. I would also suggest Greenify, an app that can put processes and apps into automatic hibernation, decreasing their CPU toll.


1

That's very interesting. Have you looked for the "Unknown" app in your Application Manager? That may shed some light on the subject, if it can or can't be found anywhere in there. Other than that, look at some recently downloaded apps, see if they have any weird numbers in the App Manager. A very puzzling problem indeed.


1

Interesting! Never seen a phone that didn't list 'Screen' as biggest drain. I'd try uninstalling apps until it's fixed, my theory being that some cheesy app (spyware?) keeps calling home. Start with the running apps list--anything running that shouldn't be? Got GPS turned off? How much free storage do you have on the phone? If the phone's memory is nearly ...


1

My current guess is that the script took a lot of CPU time because it uses a very inefficient way of calculating the log file length, which is to read the entire log file to memory and use length. This shouldn't have been much of an issue if the log file is small, but since you said that log file's current size is more than 50MB, this shows that the log file ...


1

I believe why this is happening is because when your phone goes into standby the processor goes into a state where the processor slows down to save battery life. You could try to see if there is a feature in your mod to turn off this mode. I think your phone doesn't go into power saver mode when it is plugged in, try that and see if it works (this solution ...


1

That's a broad topic, and hard to answer in short -- as it involves many aspects. As DevOfZot already pointed out, apps store their "private data" below /data/data/<package_name> -- a place usually only accessible by the app itself and root. But there are some other places as well, where apps e.g. save their cached data, temporary data, downloads, and ...


1

I had a similar incidence, in my case i left a service open. Please check if any service related, is open ? To check you can use, This link from stackoverflow


1

On my HTC Wildfire (Buzz) running Android 4.0.4 I find the corresponding option in Settings→Data Usage, when I hit the "Menu" button. This brings up A sub-menu with 4 checkboxes: Data-Roaming, Background Data, Show WiFi, Linear Scale. Tapping the "Background data" option I am informed: background data only can be limited if you defined an overall ...


1

You can check the background process limit box. Its the best way to limit your background processes and in a way save your battery. You can also use power saving mode if you have one....


1

You should try to use this bash script I wrote for you (require busybox on your Android): put the script in a file called script.bash (change with your own path) : #!/system/xbin/bash # sputnick 20120928 http://android.stackexchange.com/posts/30069 binfile=<THE PATH OF YOUR BIN FILE> bytes=$(wc -c < $binfile) c=0 count=0 while ((count < ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible