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6

Yes, Android keeps one active connection to Google's servers, but it doesn't use much power or data, because no traffic is sent along it until something sends a GCM message to an app on your phone. There's only one connection on the phone, used by all apps: installing a new app that uses GCM doesn't add any extra load. The first step in GCM is that a ...


6

Funnily enough, as I just noted here I believe that the app is just buggy and unreliable. There's no reason for the individual device to determine whether the application can do something like push notifications. Android's cloud to device messaging requires 2.2 or higher, and the Facebook post notes that that's what they require as well, so I assume that's ...


5

It's quite easy. Go to Instagram app Tap on your own name in stream (or the card icon) to go to your profile Tap the 3 vertical dots next to your name Tap Edit profile Scroll down, tap Push notifications Uncheck what you don't want. Voila!


3

Yes, it's using a push notification via Google Cloud Messaging (GCM), the same as Google+ Hangouts, Google+, Gmail, and some third-party apps.


3

Turning off 3g and reactivate it later would consume less power, as all the data can be fetched once the 3g radio is in the high power state When it is left idle, even for the most trivial data transfers, like checking the weather, the same cycle has to be repeated. Because of the long tail time that holds the device in a power mode, transmitting data as ...


3

It's not hardware or even firmware. It's part-and-parcel of Google Play Services, which is what Google is using to try to free Android users from the tyranny of OEMs and mobile carriers which do not provide timely OS updates (if at all). It's not quite an app, although it installs like one. It's a framework upon which other apps and services can be built. ...


3

Yes.


2

As you might imagine, Google is pretty quiet with regard to its implementation details. So I'll just describe this in the general case and in a very basic form. The way push is done is that the client (i.e. the phone) opens a TCP connection to the messaging server (e.g. Google). This connection is meant to remain open for as long as the phone is turned on. ...


2

Try the Profile Scheduler app. With Profile Scheduler, you can define many 'profiles' (a set of settings covering Wifi On/Off, Data-Sync On/Off, Volume settings, Display Brightness, Bluetooth state, and many others -- for full set of settings, please refer to the Play Store page I linked above). After creating your desired profiles (e.g., Sleep, Work, ...


2

If you would like something on your screen in addition to the notification in your notification bar, I would suggest using something like GoSMS with WidgetLocker. If I'm correct in your understanding, this will do what you want: Set up WidgetLocker to be your unlock screen and then place a GoSMS messaging widget on your lock screen, so you can read the ...


2

Android doesn't have "badged" icons like that by default. Unlike iOS, Android has had a pull-down list of notifications since the start, so that has become the standard way to present this kind of information in this platforms. Most Android users would be disappointed to see a 3 on their email icon, because they've come to expect a notification in the ...


2

You could try Greenify. It's an app for hibernating apps so that they don't take up a lot of resources; thus, improving battery life. However, it also lists apps in a way that lets you see which ones support GCM.


2

In Settings -> Applications, in the permissions section, tap on Show All and under Network Communication there should be Receive data from internet if the application has requested push (GCM) permission. Tested on 4.1.2, labels and positions may differ.


2

Apps that use push notifications, such as the official Facebook app or Google+ Hangouts, don't need to repeatedly check for new messages. The server sends new messages to the phone when they arrive, without having to be asked. My answer to 'How do push notifications work?' describes this in more detail. What you're asking about is apps that poll for ...


2

It is now the morning after the evening I wrote this question. My Lock and Erase settings are now automagically present in Android Device Manager. I have not changed any settings or powered off the phone, it was just 'sleeping' last night. So it looks like the Google servers needed some time to enable the settings.


1

Google Play uses C2DM (Cloud to Device Messaging) to inform your device about the download. On your device, the Google Play Store app has registered a corresponding "receiver", so it knows this message was meant for it, and downloads the .apk – which then gets installed to your device. And yes, your guess was right: C2DM is also often referred to with the ...


1

It sounds like Android Device Manager may not have administrator privileges. Go to: Settings/Security/Device Administrators/ and make sure that Android Device Manager is checked. If it isn't, check it and agree to the popup. Then you should be able to enable it in the Google Settings app.


1

As the developer documentation describes, an app needs the permission com.google.android.c2dm.permission.RECEIVE to receive GCM messages. This shows up in the permissions list as "Receive data from Internet" (which is a little vague, I know). Of course, the presence of the permission doesn't necessarily mean the app actually will use GCM. Even if it does ...


1

Historically, in order to promote battery life, Apple did not let the apps run in the background (until iOS 4.0 release in June 2010), but did provide this APNS (Apple Push Notification Service), which would let the app developers implement certain client functionality on their own third-party servers, which would then push the notification messages to ...


1

Android OS is now using GCM (Google Cloud Messaging) for Push Notification WS. You can get better idea here; it will give you an Architectural Overview about Full Push Notification Service with its Life Cycle. Hope it will Help.


1

Go to your phone's settings. Go to Sound. Tick off the Vibrate (Vibration feedback for calls and notifications) option.


1

There are several ways to accomplish things like this: Using Atomics to kill the chicken You could e.g. setup one of your Ubuntu machines as a Nagios server (or any similar service). There are several clients available for Android, like e.g. aNag and uNagi Nagios client on android (the latter even has plugins for Locale/Tasker for more flexibility: Locale ...


1

Contact your hosted Exchange provider to turn the Push off. They are enforcing it. Another way: Turn your email notification off or set its ringtone 'Silent'. But, its inconvenient.


1

For some reason, Instagram still pushes notifications when your facebook friends join Instagram, even if you have disabled all notifications in the Instagram app. To try and actually disable all Instagram notifications, I went to my phone's "Settings", selected "Apps" (under the "Device" category), looked at all downloaded apps, selected "Instagram", and ...



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