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27

In the context of Android, more RAM means Android can keep more sleeping program in the RAM so they will be ready to be quickly resumed when you return back to the apps. More RAM means Android is going to spend less of its time killing and reloading apps from the internal memory/sd card, and instead spend more time doing actual work you care about. This ...


19

I doubt that there is a direct correlation between battery consumption and RAM usage. The hardware doesn't know which RAM cells contain 'used' data and which not. So there can be no difference in battery consumption on that level. But I think that one could say that unnecessarily killing Apps causes a few extra CPU cycles when those Apps have to be ...


16

Well this is very subjective, because it depends what you're doing. First of all, true multitasking (having multiple apps run) requires a faster CPU, so that all the processes can run at a decent speed. You are right that for all these apps to remain in memory, you need more RAM. I have 512 MB RAM, and my processes only start getting killed if I run ...


15

You can't. Most smart phones are designed as a System-on-Chip; which means that the CPU, RAM, GPU, device controllers, etc are all in a single chip. Updating RAM in such system means replacing a whole lot of other stuffs. Not to mention that you probably would have a hard time finding a chip with different specification which fits perfectly into the hole ...


13

Think of RAM like a paper notebook. You can write data into the book (with a pencil), and you can erase those data and replace them with new data, but the book's always the same weight. The book doesn't get any heavier, whatever you write in it. The same way, with current RAM technology, the battery use of the RAM is fixed, regardless of what (if anything) ...


10

Although your device may have 512 MB of RAM in it, the settings almost always report the RAM that is available to user processes, not all of the physical RAM. This means that it won't report any memory that is being used by: Android's system-level processes Your GPU, which often uses shared memory Any memory a cellular radio chip may need to function ...


8

Wrong. Galaxy S does have 512 Mb. the problem is that you cannot use it all for programs. From that 512 Mb of memory 128 Mb are reserved for graphical purposes and for phone modem. You don't want any call to end because programs running took all that memory, do you? The problem with the Galaxy S is that if we take into account that 128Mb we should have ...


7

No not every android phone does this but it is done in many HTC phones. The reason is simple: memory usage. Here is the breakdown: When the system is running out of memory, the inbuilt task killer of the system automatically kicks in and checks to see if it can stop an application and recover some RAM. HTC Sense devices employ a launcher that is "heavy" ...


6

It may be possible to add swap space, see Adding Swap Space Ram to G1 for example.


6

Simple answer: No. Android always uses OOM (Out-Of-Memory) prioritizing to free unused memory. You can change the priorities of apps (at least until reboot) with some task managers but even then if the memory runs low, apps in the background start getting killed. Think about this scenario: you've downloaded a badly coded app which runs on boot, causes a ...


6

There are several factors, which I'll address (pun intended) in no particular order. RAM is expensive Sure, memory chips may be cheap, but that's not the only (or even the main) cost. Alongside the RAM itself you need extra buses, power lines, bigger memory controllers, heatsinks, &c. The RAM also takes physical space on-chip. For oomph-per-dollar, at ...


5

Android devices are very similar to computers, they consist of a BIOS (Basic Input Output System), an OS (Operating System) and then Applications and Data. The BIOS would be stored in EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory), or rather a sub-type called Flash Memory. (Wikipedia) When the BIOS loads the OS then it is moved into RAM ...


5

Yes. You can partition your SD card and add a swap space to it; I have this on my G1. However, it's fairly complicated voodoo. (link is for G2, but instructions should be good for most phones; however, you should probably search XDA for whatever your phone is to be sure) Swapper 2 from the market will do this for you, apparently. I haven't tried it ...


5

This is a known problem with leaked 2.2 Galaxy S Vibrant software (happened to me). Even if you're not using a Vibrant I would suspect the issue is the same, since the software is mostly the same. You can fix it using this post at XDA if you have a Vibrant or i9000. If you have another model just check the subforum for your device (or take a risk and try ...


5

I don't think there will be much benefit with swapping for Android, as the Android Application Life Cycle is a much more advanced form of swapping. (1) Will there be many not-oftenly-used memory pages to swap out, especially in OS and those un-killable services? You can't swap the OS kernel even in Desktop Linux and Android already kills services ...


5

Cyanogenmod ROMs has a feature that by LONG pressing the BACK button you can kill the running process.


5

AFAIK, you can't. But, you can customise when to kill background apps (not selective app) by tweaking MinFree values set by Android (root is required for tweaking). If you have problems dealing with it, there are many apps in Play Store for that. My fav is AutoKiller Memory Optimizer. And, when foreground app and/or kernel runs out of memory, killing ...


5

In Linux/Android it is not recommended to close apps or use task killers. Unlike a Windows computer/phone, Linux/Android can keep applications "running" in the background which doesn't use any CPU or networking (unless it's a media player). It has actually been proven that closing apps causes more battery drain, because instead of Android being able to ...


5

If you've read around, then you'll already have read that the idea of "free RAM" is a bit of a nonsense for Android. PC operating systems take an app out of RAM as soon as you quit it, which leaves empty space that the PC probably has to spend power on filling again afterwards - probably with the same app next time you run it. Android tries to avoid this ...


5

Android doesn't use virtual memory (in the sense you mean) by default, because it has a higher-level mechanism. Transparently writing pages of memory to flash storage is bad for battery life (and for the life of your flash storage, which can only handle a certain number of writes) and performance, especially since the application has no control over which ...


4

From looking at some posts on Android Forums (1), (2) I think it's just not possible - to get more windows/tabs you'll need to use another browser like Dolphin HD/Mini. Edit: Looks from this post on XDA that it's hard-coded into the browser; it can be changed, but not easily.


4

There is definitely a benefit to swapping, despite what everyone else on the Internet will tell you. Try it and see for yourself. Empirically, on a G1 or other phone with low memory, swap makes the phone run better and faster. Yes, Android has Life Cycle "task management" built in, but it's not very good. It routinely kills processes when it runs out of ...


4

When you create a new AVD (Android Virtual Device). Under Hardware, click New: From the drop down list of Property, select Device ram size. Click OK. You can now put a value beside of Device ram size of how big you want it to be. Note: You have to create a new AVD. You can't edit them as far as I know.


4

In a phone most of the programs you will use are thinks like email, IM, web browser,… This kind of apps does not need a powerful CPU, but given the fact that you will be using an Android Phone you will be running multiple applications at the same time which needs some extra CPU time, but more importantly, needs enough RAM memory to accommodate all the ...


4

I think ADW Launcher has a setting that should keep the application in memory. Also, CM has a setting to force the OS to keep the launcher in memory. I dont remember where it is at in CM6, but in CM7 it is in Settings -> CyanogenMod Settings -> Performance and it is called "Lock Home in Memory". I don't remember if it was in the same place or if it was ...


4

If there is a ICS ROM available for the Droid X, it should run on a device with 512MB. The minimum requirements for ICS specified by CyanogenMod team is 256MB and a "decent GPU". I am not sure what kind of GPU the Droid X has, but you will probably have a better experience with Gingerbread then ICS on that device if the GPU isn't that great. My brother had ...


4

In the "linux world", what android is at its core, free RAM is wasted RAM. The system will attempt to use up as much RAM as needed. If more is needed, and there are applications that are no longer requiring the RAM it has allocated, the system will free up the RAM from that application an allocate it to the new application that needs it. Having less RAM ...


4

An part of the RAM is reserved - often for the GPU - and not useable by the dalvik VM and Apps. This is not uncommon: Samsungs Galaxy S has also 512MB but only 334MB are useable by Apps. This can differ from ROM version to version.


4

Things that would be cleared are anything that isn't saved, open applications, etc. For example, if you were playing a game, and just pressed the home key the game would go to the background and be paused. When you restart your phone, you will lose that game (up until the last point it saved). Other things that you leave half finished, such as an ...


4

No it isn't. At least if you have to ask about it. Replacing any chip would require several thousand dollars worth of equipment and experience. Not to mention obtaining the correct replacement.



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