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11

Use the app Quick Boot to restart your device (a rooted device). Answer seems to be given partially here: I've rooted my phone. Now what? What do I gain from rooting? Use the app Quick Boot to restart your device. Start the Quick boot app and choose 'Reboot' and there you go.


9

I'm not sure about logging but, safe mode disables many system services during boot. On some systems it can bypass the security pattern or pin. I haven't found any additional features. It seems to be more for reducing features for the sake of diagnostics. Windows has a similar feature. I've posted a link on starting safe mode on a variety of devices for ...


6

Regarding your first 2 questions (reboot / suspend) : No this is not normal, however, as a lot of software from a lot of different vendors are running on your phone, it's inevitable that under certain conditions certain apps can cause your phone to "crash". In an ideal world, no piece of software should be able to crash the underlying OS and the phone, ...


6

I had a similar random-rebooting problem, and after one such reboot, I hooked up the phone to my laptop and ran "adb bugreport" on it. I got what looked like useful information, and attached it to the bug. So I think at least some log information survives a reboot. Here's the bug, btw: http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=24118


6

If it works like other "hot boot" apps and functions, then it basically restarts the Android GUI processes/threads. There was an XDA news post a while back after someone made an app for it where the app author described it as such: Hot reboot by rebooting only the graphical Android shell. From what I know it's sort of equivalent to restarting your X ...


5

Engadget has just reported that the Nexus S is having issues with random reboots (http://www.engadget.com/2011/02/15/nexus-s-suffering-from-random-data-loss-reboots/) and apparently fixes are coming. To see the log you can get the following app: aLogCat


4

I finally found out why! :D When the phone boots - at least if I use go launcher - if the sd card is not completely mounted apps "get lost". I've completely solved the problem activating my phone card pin code. I turn on the phone, wait on the pin code screen without entering it for a minute and then I enter the pin: everything is perfect. I think the ...


4

If it was working before, try uninstalling the app(s) you put on it most recently. They might be the problem. After that, the first thing to try is probably a factory reset. Edit: OK, so basically your ROM is totally screwed up. I would just replace it. Some official firmware is linked in this XDA post. Download whichever you prefer, then use Odin as ...


4

Simple, really: Android is safely shutting down vital parts of the run-time, broadcasting intents to notify apps/services to gracefully shut down, which in turn flush their caches for data and shared-preferences, save what-nots to the sqlite database, etc. In other words, apps and services are given a chance to do their clean up systematically. The ...


4

Force stop is a one-off action, not a thing you enable or disable. Force-stopping an app doesn't prevent it restarting any time it would normally start: when you launch it from the apps menu, or through a share action, or automatically via an alarm, broadcast, or on start-up. The question you link to talks about whether the button is clickable (enabled) or ...


3

Android is pretty resistant to faults resulting from sudden power loss, but there's always a risk of data corruption/loss, depending on open apps and files at the moment. Have you tried holding the power button longer, for about 15 seconds (until the screen goes black and the normal startup screen appears)? On my Galaxy S this triggers a hard reboot, ...


3

I read similar reports lately, related to Titanium Backup.. When it runs, it kills apps to back them up, causing the phone process to restart. If you aren't running something similar, I would recommend using USB debugging and the SDK to capture log data.. Known as "logcat" in the Android world. Oh -- Here's an easy way to capture and review log data on ...


3

Do a factory reset (here are instructions). Grab the update from here (dead link) and re-flash it. You may need to put it in the /sdcard folder and name it update.zip, or use Fastboot through adb (you need to install the Android SDK on your PC).


3

Logs are written even when logcat is not connected, although I believe the logs are limited to a certain maximum size. They are, however, cleared on reboot. You can try using an app such as aLogCat to persist the logs to files, and hope it can catch whatever is misbehaving "in the act".


3

The first thing I would try to do is to retrieve the logs of the errors via ADB, and/or crash dumps. Retrieving the logs is tricky, since the log cache gets erased on reboot. If the phone reboots even while sitting on a charger, try running adb logcat continuously (you will need Android SDK and USB drivers installed and configured on your PC.) When the ...


3

I would unlock the bootloader, and flash a new image... You can find all the information you need on this page: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1392310 Hope you found my answer helpful :)


3

You can't change this. Simple solution: Don't shut down your phone any more (except when it runs out of battery). If you switch off your screen only, your phone will go to sleep and won't consume much power. If it still eats too much battery, consider disabling wifi, background data, sync or even switching to airplane mode. As noted in the comments the logo ...


3

The reason it does not work properly is this: The init.rc script resides in within the RAMDisk attached to the boot image. Hence the init.rc script that was edited and pushed across is now overwritten by the boot image's own script upon reboot - effectively changes are lost! You need to extract the boot image, using every boot image has the kernel and ...


3

If you can connect using adb (usb debugging), you can simply use the command "reboot". If you're rooted and have a terminal emulator installed, "su reboot" will do the same thing. The reboot command will also accept arguments of "recovery" or "bootloader", which will reboot you into the recovery or bootloader respectively.


3

You could start by not overclocking the device. That's a common cause of system instability even in ROMs that are usually stable. If it's still unstable because of that, it could just be instability caused by (bugs in) the ROM you're using. Try flashing back to the the stock HTC ROM. If it's still unstable after flashing back to the stock ROM, it could be ...


2

If your G2x is rooted, the easiest work-around would be deleting the Tasker's data from recovery. Download and install Android SDK and LG's drivers for the G2x. Reboot the G2x into recovery mode (preferably ClockworkMod), connect to PC, and in command prompt issue the following commands: cd C:\AndroidSDK\platform-tools\ adb shell su rm -rf ...


2

Doing a factory reset WILL NOT modify the sdcard in any way. Only the data on the phone will be deleted. Contacts that are set up to sync with your google account will restore, but everything else will be gone. If you have applications installed on the sdcard, I would start there. Uninstall them, or move them back to the device storage. You say that it ...


2

First, to answer one question simply, yes you will lose all of your data doing a factory reset unless you back it up. If you feel a factory reset is necessary, I would using a program like Titanium Backup to backup your data. This is if you are rooted. As for the issue with your SD card, it could be a number of things. You said that it worked fine for 8 ...


2

An app can certainly deliberately reboot the phone, depending on the permissions for the app in question and whether it has root privileges. An app can also force you phone to reboot if it bombs out and takes Android down with it, particularly apps that interact with phone functionality (volume adjustors, automatic task killers - which are a bad idea in ...


2

I tried a different approach, seeing the problem was with radio / telephony... I put in another SIM from a different carrier, and so far I am having no reboots! What is the difference? My main carrier is a "virtual carrier", a company that rents other company's network to offer their service, usually with more competitive prices. The SIM I'm using now is ...


2

Well, it sounds like you don't want to monkey much. (Otherwise I'd recommend rooting and then installing vanilla 2.2, which is going to be the most stable of any release). It sounds like the problem you experienced is just a flat out bug and might not have anything to do with any apps you are running. On the other hand, are you using any task-killing apps, ...


2

In my case it didn't seem to have anything to do with any software configuration or combination on my phone and was purely hardware related. This is not to say that in some cases the software you may or may not have on your device would be causing a memory leak / stack overflow and causing your device to reboot as a result. I couldn't, and wouldn't, believe ...


2

You can install the android SDK and use DDMS to monitor the logcat. The thing with a logcat, it is cleared when the device reboots, but you may be able to get an idea of what is crashing if you are monitoring it before it reboots. You can probably also find unofficial CM9 nightlies for the Galaxy S2, but I am not sure what issues still exist for that ...


2

Something might have overwritten some files needed during boot. Go into recovery and do a factory reset. Yes this is the same thing as factory reset in the Settings but the difference is that you dont need to boot the OS to do it. There is usually a button combination you press to get into recovery. Google it for your device. Once you factory reset, try ...



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