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11

If you have a fastboot-enabled bootloader version (such as the old 0.76.0000 engineering HBOOT in the EVO's case) you can use that to flash it from a PC via USB. Reboot into your bootloader, then select the "Fastboot" option from the boot menu (if it has one, it may start up fastboot automatically). Once it's ready, go to your PC's shell and execute: ...


11

On my encrypted Nexus S I use a temporary tmpfs mount on /sdcard in CWM. It has enough RAM to hold the new ROM in memory during the update: Download your ROM to /tmp/update.zip and boot into recovery. Then log in via 'adb shell': ## on the host machine do: me@workstation:/tmp$ adb shell ## now on the device in 'adb shell' mode... ~ # mount -t tmpfs none ...


11

Yes, custom recovery works with encrypted honeycomb device. The built-in encryption doesn't touch ROM & firmware at all. It just encrypts accounts, settings, downloaded apps & their data etc. which can be located on phone memory, internal SD or external SD. That's why encryption is no longer present after factory reset because there's no encrypted ...


10

I had the same problem and I found the solution is to rename a file in the system folder: remount /system in read/write mode (use something like the Root Explorer app or ES File Explorer; both have root modes (check the app's settings) for remounting /system as writable) rename the /system/recovery-from-boot.p to /system/recovery-from-boot.p-bak ...


9

Generally, reboot binary provides a recovery switch. After switching to root, execute this command: /system/bin/reboot recovery This may not work if your manufacturer doesn't support it. ROM Manager type apps uses API of Android which you can't access via Terminal Emulator directly.


7

OK. I found the correct combination. It seems that the recovery distributed with Cyanogenmod 10 M2 for galaxysmtd is really picky about the hardware buttons. Here's how you can boot to recovery: Start with Galaxy S powered off Press and hold Volume up + Home Press and hold Power button Wait for (factory default) Galaxy S GT-I9000 boot display to show up ...


6

Edit: Apparently download and recovery modes are merged for the G1. Just press Alt-L on your physical keyboard while in Download mode, and Recovery will show up. What you're seeing is Download Mode. The key combination is usually subtly different. In the case of my phone, it's just a matter of having the phone connected to USB or not. You should try it ...


6

Technically, it's not prerequisite, but convenience. You can download an update using your handset and store it locally on the sdcard, then reboot manually into recovery. Or use Rom Manager to do all that in an app and enjoy backup/restore and OTA updating without the need for a computer. Stock recoveries won't let you do all the fancy stuff that a custom ...


6

Is a different version of the recovery really needed for different OS versions? No. In case of updating custom roms you're completely right in that the recovery is mostly* independent of the rom used. However phone manufacturers sometimes push out updates that change some vital parts of the phone. For example repartition the phone. This is why sometimes ...


6

Clockworkmod stores its backups in /sdcard/clockworkmod/backup (replace /sdcard with the path for your external card if you're looking for backups to external memory). With versions prior to 6.0, you can move off (or delete) the entire directory to clear space. The entire backup is self-contained. If you're using a 6.0 or greater version of Clockworkmod, ...


5

If you are talking about a Nandroid backup: Yes, it would. It creates images from the devices file systems -- so all that's stored there gets copied to those image files. You can then even extract single items using e.g. Titanium Backup.


5

The general consensus is there's usually different partitions available: system data cache boot recovery When a guide says to flash "partition" where partition is one of the above, then that implies transferring the contents destined for the partition. The mileage will vary depending on the handset/manufacturer as not all of them actually have ...


5

It was removed because It's total placebo these days. I wrote it for dealing with the silly things that happen when we used to put apps on SD before Android supported it. Since then, it's been something of a sugar pill that magically fixes all problems without actually doing anything. (Taken from the commit history, posted by Steve Kondik)


5

I just did this! /data/property/persist.sys.dalvik.vm.lib is a textfile containing one of two values: 'libart.so' or 'libdvm.so'. You can change from ART to Dalvik simply by editing this file. Ex: adb shell 'echo libdvm.so >/data/property/persist.sys.dalvik.vm.lib'


4

The below assumes you have the GT-i9000 (international Galaxy S). Go to this XDA thread and download the newest 2.2 firmware for your region. Download Odin for Windows (search for "Heimdall" if you are on Linux). Then do the following: Put your phone into Download mode Remove the battery Hold VolumeDown plus the Home key plus Power. While holding, ...


4

One way is to open ROM Manager and choose "Flash ClockworkMod Recovery". Select your device when it prompts and wait for it to download the latest (non-touch) recovery. Using a file browser, go to /sdcard/clockworkmod/download/<site>/recoveries and paste your .img there. <site> may be mirror.kanged.net or something else, just check the folders ...


4

You cannot issue adb remount unless your handset is rooted, which is why it failed in your case a la "remount failed: Operation not permitted". There is an answer to how to root the Galaxy S2.


4

If you are using a version newer than 6.0 I'd recommend you use the delete backup function in CWM. It's in backup and restore -> delete (and delete from external SD). Doing this will ensure that you don't delete a blob that is being used in another backup, as all backups now share the same blob directory. After deleting from either place use the ...


4

Sony Xperia Devices use a recovery-in-boot arrangement. While you can't simply flash a version of TWRP or CWM, you can flash a kernel that includes what you need. For the Xperia L, you can flash the Phanton Kernel, which includes CWM. There is no other way to do get CWM or TWRP without flashing a new kernel.


4

The "device not supported" message means that you probably downloaded the recovery image for a different device (AT&T's LG G2 "d802", or International LG G2 "d800".) You can override this check, but it's not recommended, as the devices might be different enough that you could cause irreparable damage to it (a.k.a. "bricking".) The most current TWRP ...


3

Is it unplugged when trying to do this? I could hold X while booting, then I would see the Android and exclamation. Then hold Up/Down Volume and get the recovery. You have to press both Up & Down at the same time. It is not a rocker key and you can press them both. Use Enter key on keypad with the arrow above OK to make a selection.


3

Try flashing the Recovery image manually via fastboot, as described in this guide: Download the latest version of the ClockworkMod Recovery from here. Place the ClockworkMod Recovery Image in the same folder as fastboot (the /tools folder with the Android SDK folder). Power the Nexus S down, and hold Volume Up & the Power button until booted ...


3

"HBoot" mode is something of a misnomer, really, that I usually see when people mean "reboot into your HBoot menu". I think the reason these got conflated to each other is because Fastboot mode activates by default when you land on HBoot on most (possibly all) HTC phones. They do exist separately, though, as devices without an HBoot menu can still have a ...


3

I have just a few hours ago flashed ClockworkMod Recovery on my Galaxy S in order to switch from stock ROM to cyanogenmod. Simply follow the instructions from the official Samsung Galaxy S Full Update Guide. The relevant section about flashing recovery contains the steps you need to follow. Make sure to read the Note at the end of the section if the first ...


3

Prerequesites: unlocked phone ('fastboot oem unlock' command) installed Android SDK with accessible adb and fastboot executables (both are part of the SDK) Cyanogenmod 7/9 or 10 image from get.cm (or whatever ROM you want) Nexus S CWM recovery image from clockworkmod.com Steps: Flash the CWM recovery image: Switch off your Nexus S, press volume up ...


3

Have you tried plugging in the charger? or else plugging in the charger and while plugged in, remove and then re-insert battery. Some phones tend to start up in that manner. Also if you can connect via adb (even if your phone is powered down), the adb devices followed by adb reboot ought to start your phone. If you're rooted, there are apps like Quick ...


3

Installing a recovery and flashing your rom Download your recovery.img or wahtever the name is to your fastboot folder. adb reboot bootloader fastboot flash recovery recovery.img fastboot reboot recovery Now use your recovery to flash your rom. At this point you may not be able boot into your rom if you do not have S-OFF.But give it a try. If it works ...


3

I'm partial to TWRP. The biggest difference I've noticed is that CWM requires you to either boot into recovery or use Rom Manager to flash a rom, while TWRP allows any program with root access (goo manager, Rom Toolbox, etc) to flash roms. There are probably some other differences, but this was the big one for me.


3

The important part looks to be this: It's worth mentioning that I have data encryption turned on. I don't believe ClockworkMod can handle encrypted devices as of yet, which is problematic for devices that lack true external storage support (e.g. SD cards). The reason it's a problem is that /sdcard on these devices is not a separate partition, it's a ...


2

When an SGS won't go into recovery mode, there's a couple things you can try. One thing is to hold all the buttons to get into recovery or download mode (VolDown + Power + Home, or VolUp + Power + Home, or VolDown + VolUp + Power depending on your model) until the device has reset 2 or 3 times, and then release Power so that the device stops resetting. ...



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