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6

This isn't the "correct" way, but IMO it's a good way: use Ringdroid. With it, you can cut a suitable part of the MP3 to be used as a ringtone. This way you can get rid of those pesky intros on songs that have a slow start and save space by not having the entire MP3 duplicate in your ringtones folder.


5

SMS Popup does vibration patterns on a per contact basis (or for all texts). Handcent does it only for all texts. Missed Call will do vibration patterns for SMS (per contact), phone calls (per contact), Battery, Calendar events, device storage, etc.


5

In System Settings -> Sound you should be able to select Pick Ringtone. If you don't find the ringtone you want, you can use any MP3 or OGG. Just put the file on your sdcard in /sdcard/Ringtones/. Media scanner will classify anything in this directory as a Ringtone.


5

I placed mine in /sdcard/media/audio/ringtones. After that the sound appears in the settings menu. See also: How do I set a custom MP3 as a ringtone for other notifications?


4

In last versions of Android (at least in Nexus S) it's kinda hard to set MP3 as a ringtone. There was an option before in the menus called "Set As" but in the new Music app it disappeared. What you can do is copy your mp3 to /sdcard/media/audio/ringtones, that ringtones folder might be empty or even not exist, in this case just create it. Then you go to ...


4

I'd highly suggest Zedge for awesome ringtones! Everyone in my family has been using it for quite a while, and finding some pretty sweet stuff :) They have ringtones in the following categories: All Categories Alternative Blues Bollywood Children Christian & Gospel Classical Comedy Country Dance Electronica Entertainment Games Hip Hop Holiday Jazz ...


3

Use volume-rocker Click either up or down volume to silence your phone. This is the user-manual-recommended way. When you click it your screen stays on. Android user manual reference Note: this usually works with any phone, not just Androids. It used to work with old stupid-phones (antonym of smart-phones) as well.


3

When the Galaxy Nexus is ringing... Tap the power button on the right side of the screen. The ringtone will stop and the screen will switch off. BUT the call has not been hung up. You can even press the power button again to switch the screen back on and the ringtone is silent if the call is still waiting to be answered. The voice call will still be at ...


3

As the iPhone system sounds are the property of Apple, I cannot help you find them. If you do, however, place ringtones on your SD card under /ringtones and other sounds like new mail notification under /notifications. Go back into preferences and you should now be able to select these sounds.


3

I asked this question to a friend and he suggested the AudioManager Widget. It allows you to control volumes for Alarm, Media, Alerts, Ringer, System, and Voice Calls independently. It also allows you to toggle vibrate for alerts and ringer independently. So far, it seems to be a solid app.


3

If you are rooted, you can push this collection of media files to /system/media/ Without root, android should still locate the files if you place them in a folder on your SD card called "media" and retain the rest of the file structure from the zip.


3

To set up your mp3 file as a ringtone, simply create a new folder on your SD Card and rename it "ringtones", without the quotes of course. (Do same for alarms, notifications and ui). After that, add your mp3 files to the folder. Go to "Setting--sound--phone ringtone", there, you will see your added mp3 file. Joseph Nwalor (Slow).


3

I don't know if it could be your case, but if your phone is connected to your computer with UMS (USB Mass Storage) enabled along having a custom ringtone stored on your SD card (/ringtones folder) instead of MTP this will give you this kind of problem. The phone will use a default ringtone since it cannot access the SD card files, because the UMS mode ...


3

I believe what you're asking about are similar to the Verizon ringback tones, right? Ringback tones are not set from a phone level, they are a feature added and managed by the carrier. Your wireless carrier could probably change it for you, but there is no way you could manage it all from your phone. I know Verizon offers ringback tones, if that's the ...


2

New app called WhoIsIt lets you customize the ring/notification audio and vibration. Lifehacker review


2

use Ringdroid! it's got a spectacular GUI, it automatically finds all music files on your phone, and allows you to make custom ringtones and set them directly from the app. Best ringtone app i've ever used.


2

Another option is Ringo, which I've been using for over a year and it works great for just this purpose (I have a server that yells at me too). The free version has everything I need, though there is a paid version with more options as well.


2

Ryan is correct and I would recommend SMS Popup. Been using it since my G1 days. Lots of options like quick replies, custom vibration, and alert repetition to complement the custom message tones. You will need to turn off the native message notifications though, but it's definitely worth it.


2

By default you can set different ringtones for each contact by hitting the menu button form the contact window and choosing options. To add vibration into that mix you can use an app called WhoIsIt, that among other things lets you set different vibration patterns for each contact. Another way is suggested in this answer. A more powerful but complicated ...


2

The app Rings Extended combined with any free file manager will do what you want. Once installed, picking a ringtone will pop up a window asking which app to use for ringtone selection. Tick the option to make it a default and choose "Rings Extended". It will then allow you to pick any supported music file from your SD card for ring and notification tones. ...


2

You can use Handcent app as the default ringtone picker. To set Handcent as default ringtone picker, go to Settings | Applications | Manage Applications | All | Android System (Sound picker for SE phones) Click 'Clear Defaults' button. After this, When you are choosing a ringtone, You will be presented with a dialog box asking you to select one ...


2

You don't need to make your own folders. The proper file to put the mp3s is /system/media/audio/ - where you will find folders for /alarms , /notifications , and /ringtones There are two things to keep in mind when doing this: If you are using full-sized .mp3's , you will put considerable strain on the system when it comes time to load one. In my ...


2

You probably found the correct location (if your "root of the device" refers to the root of your sdcard). For details on those directories, please check with Is there any documentation on the correct/expected directory structure of the external memory card?. One thing which however may apply: For those files to become available with your settings, the Media ...


2

If you are comfortable with copying files in a file explorer Go grab ES File Explorer if you don't have a file manager already. Make sure that root browsing is enabled and navigate to /sdcard/Android/data/com.google.android.music/files/music. Hopefully you don't have too many songs stored locally, cause this is the not-so-fun part. Go through song-by-song ...


2

I don't believe that there's a way to do this using the settings in the built in Messaging app, but there are 3rd party apps that can enhance the built-in app's notifications capability. I use SMS Popup which lets you carry on using the built-in Messaging app to send and receive text messages, but replaces the notifications. Amongst the extra options it ...


2

You can use an app like WavePad Audio Editing App. It is said to have the ability to work with multiple audio files. If you do not mind adverts, there is a free version for this software as well.


2

Though the is a little bit vague in nature, seems a very useful question for a larger community. You can use high pitched ringtones which are very common around the internet. Also I came across this post at XDA which seems quite useful for you. (did not test them myself though. even if me or anybody did, the level you require might be different.) In the ...


2

Default ringtones are usually stored in /system/media/audio/ringtones. You might be able to access this location using a file manager. Keep in mind that, residing on /system, this place is read-only at best without root-access: so while you should be able to copy from here, you cannot place any files into this directory. If you want to manually add ...


2

There is a bug in Android 4.4 which causes flac files to pop and stutter. AndroidPolice has an article on it, there is a fix that has been committed (but not released) according to this bug report. It should be fixed in the next release (although when that'll be is anyone's guess) Since the problem exists in Android's native flac codec, which is used ...


1

There are special directories you can use to store your custom "noises". The "starting point" (root-of-noises-dir) may be different between devices (so this is rather a generic answer, as I do not own all of them) -- pick one and check if it works, if not, pick the next: /sdcard/media/audio /sdcard/media /sdcard In there, put the directories for the ...



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