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26

taken straight from android developer site There is no effect on the application performance so long as the external storage is mounted on the device. The .apk file is saved on the external storage, but all private user data, databases, optimized .dex files, and extracted native code are saved on the internal device memory. The unique container in which ...


18

That has to do with the Multi-User feature enabled with JellyBean 4.2 (not 4.1). In order to handle separate accounts, parts of the directory structure had to be changed. /sdcard/legacy e.g. always points to the currently logged-in user's sd card directory. I currently cannot find the document where I read the details, so I cannot link any source. But with ...


13

Absolutely, and it's very easy. This is the procedure for my Samsung Galaxy S; other phones may be different: Plug in the USB cable and a USB icon appears in the notification area at the top of the screen. Pull down the notification and tap "USB connected". Tap "Mount" on the dialog box that's displayed. Two removable drives show up on my PC; one for ...


13

Like Bryan says (I can't comment so had to add another answer...), it doesn't move the whole app. The size given after the move is the bit still on the internal storage - it doesn't give any size for the elements that have beend moved to SD. So in answer to your question, the app doesn't get smaller, just amount of internal storage used gets smaller.


13

Found an answer to my own question! Might as well share how I did it (DO IT AT YOUR OWN RISK, it worked fine for me). Needs root obviously. Using a root-enabled file manager, navigate to /system/etc/permissions Edit platform.xml and find the WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE permission. Add an additional group definition for this permission...<group gid="media_rw" ...


12

In order to view local files on the sdcard with the default Android browser just enter file://sdcard/ and then the path to the file you want to view. For example if you have an xml file named "person" in a folder named "xmlfiles" it would look like file://sdcard/xmlfiles/person.xml in your address bar. You can create bookmarks for the file you are viewing ...


11

The information below is from a developer website, it is the closest I could find to a definitive answer. From website: If you're using API Level 7 or lower, use getExternalStorageDirectory() to open a File that represents the root of the external storage, then save your shared files in one of the following directories: * Music/ - Media scanner classifies ...


10

Applications installed on SD card cannot run if you remove your SD card or you're turning on USB Mass storage (so it can be accessed from a computer). That's the only drawback I have been experiencing. I've actually seen performance improvement since moving to SD; before I moved to SD I had exhausted the internal memory (about a few kilobytes left) and the ...


9

Indeed, Android's native "Move to SD Card" does not move the entire app to the card. Things like app's data, cache and dalvik-cache (optimized bytecode) are left on the device's internal memory. You can try to mitigate this by regularly clearing out the cache of apps you use most often (e.g. Browser, etc.) by going to Menu -> Settings -> Applications ...


8

I'm tempted to say everything is safe to delete. It should be, with a storage device intended to be removed and used elsewhere. But I know some apps will be unhappy. So a good rule is not to delete anything that's clearly used by an app that you care about. It's probably a good idea not to delete level 0 directories that start with a . such as ...


7

This can "officially" only be done if you are running android-2.2-froyo and you set the app to install on the sdcard. If you are not running android-2.2-froyo then the only way to do it is with some "hackery", which involves partitioning your sdcard, symbolic links and some other things. There are some custom ROMs that would have this built in The ...


7

An app consists of dex files, apk files, data files and libraries. When you install apps in SD card, not all of the parts of the apps are kept in SD card. Some of them remains in internal Storage. However if you have a rooted phone, you can use program like link2sd to move all the pieces of app to SD card. EDIT: You can use program like app2sd to easily ...


7

Android scans your sd card. When it finds an MP3 playlist (m3u file) it looks for media files in the same path, if it does not find any, it deletes the playlist because it thinks it is empty. To stop this from happening create a file in the folder with the m3u file called .nomedia. This will tell the media scanner to ignore the content in the folder.


7

An app must explicitly support App2SD, or you cannot move it to the card. There are several reasons why an app might not support it: using widgets (both mentioned apps seem to fall into this category. AK Notepad: "Pin notes to your home screen"; Any.DO: "You can even add our widget to your homescreen") running a service As the sdcard would be ...


7

A good application to do that is the Samba Filesharing. It shares your sdcard, making it easy to transfer files from/to your phone. Settings After installing the application from Google Play, open it and fill a password by touching the password menu. The default username is SDCARD and the default Workgroup is WORKGROUP. You can leave it that way or change ...


7

Unless you've done something unusual with your device, the SD card will be formatted as a FAT file system, which does not support *nix file permissions. This Linux FAQ entry from one of MIT's professors explains it a bit, and also explains how you can potentially use mount options to change the permission mode of the device (this would require root, though, ...


6

SD cards generally use the FAT file system, which does not allow for filesystem permissions. This means that the Android OS would have to manage a custom list of files, their permissions, a mapping of apps to files/folders, etc. in order to prevent apps from accessing the whole card. This would be a terrible mess. Not only complicated, but it would ...


6

Some file systems are pretty robust, if you used ext3/4 and yaffs2, the chance of getting caught in situation where the filesystem cannot recover is scarcer than winning a lottery. These file system utilizes logging to revert inconsistencies; At every startup, Android will check the filesystem's log, if the log is not empty that means the file system is not ...


6

The Market doesn't support this (or any search filters aside from price and "safe search", really) on either the website or the native app. It has been requested a handful of times on the Google support forums, but never really received much of a response. AppBrain does support this, however (example search), so you could use that to search and then install ...


6

There are many available choices, depending on the features you need: Cryptonite uses EncFS and requires root LUKS also requires root and provides on-the-fly encryption (AES by default) to virtual folders Eds provides encrypted containers and does not require root. It even is compatible to TrueCrypt. DroidCrypt can encrypt single files or full directories. ...


6

There are many "*2SD" methods, and they generally involve root access. My personal favorite is Link2SD. It uses symlinks, which take up (practically) no space. The actual program, data, libraries, etc are stored on a second partition on your SD card. This comes with the downside of actually having to create two partitions on your SD card (meaning it will ...


5

Thanks to this answer to this question Is moving apps to SD only available to rooted devices?. I've discovered the getInstallLocation ADB command and set the install location to internal on my un-rooted phone. With the Android SDK installed, and my phone connected via USB with USB Debugging mode switched on, enter the following commands: adb devices ...


5

I haven't tried it yet myself, but here is an XDA thread featuring a program that lets you move any app on or off your SD card and set the installation default to Internal, SD or Auto. I believe Auto is the default.


5

This is a known problem with leaked 2.2 Galaxy S Vibrant software (happened to me). Even if you're not using a Vibrant I would suspect the issue is the same, since the software is mostly the same. You can fix it using this post at XDA if you have a Vibrant or i9000. If you have another model just check the subforum for your device (or take a risk and try ...


5

There's always a risk with not cleanly unmounting a file system. By pulling the battery, you're not allowing the system to finish up what it's doing on the SD card, and if you catch it at the right time, it can sadly screw things up pretty badly. With some luck, you may be able to run a diagnostic on the file system and recover some of the data, but it all ...


5

This is a feature that requires Froyo, so unless you have a Nexus One you'll need to either root your phone (which you've already said you don't want to do) and install a Froyo ROM or wait for your manufacturer/carrier to issue you Froyo in an update. Either way, moving apps to your SD card is pretty straightforward. Go into Settings, then Manage ...


5

Go to Settings -> About phone -> USB Settings and set it to Mass Storage. You may also need to enable or disable Settings -> Applications -> Development -> USB debugging. The drives should be visible to the PC when you connect the device, but you should also have to click the USB notification you mention and tell it to actually mount the ...


5

Have just noticed this too on my (original) Galaxy S since it got the Gingerbread update, presume that this is something that Samsung have changed in their Gingerbread build, as the S2 comes with Gingerbread from the factory. On the Galaxy S (and I presume it will be the same on the S2) they have a built-in storage (either 8GB or 16GB in the original S) ...


5

As there's no response anymore from the OP, a short summary from the comments for possible solutions: This issue can have multiple reasons: broken/damaged sd card trouble with the file system on the card (damaged or simply not existing), or with the partition table broken/damaged sd card slot incompatible sd card specs (speed, class, brand, ...) These ...



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