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0

Try the mailwise app, it bypasses exchange security but you won't be able to use the gmail app.


0

On samsung devices overwrite to the EFS partition or write on byte to the nv_data files it contains. Bam imei gone. You may also change device Bluetooth Mac bam second radio unusable wifi ... Not so sure, though. On the plus side only you have the chance to restore the original imei if your device should return. That is if you have a backup. It's extremely ...


1

This works at my device: Settings -> Security -> Deactivate Administrators. Deactivate anything listed. Settings -> Security -> Clear credentials.


0

If there are certain apps you don't want your kids to use, you can use something like Perfect App Lock . With this tool, you can password protect any app/setting on your android device. Lets say you password protect Chrome with this tool. That means if anyone clicks on Chrome icon, they will be prompted for a password. Of course there are many other tools ...


3

You can simply erase you security credentials in security and this will automatically allow you to remove the lock screen on 5.0


2

Since I just upgrade to 5.0/Lollipop, I can't confirm for sure if this setting is present in KitKat/4.4, but in 5.0, you can hide the last digit in the PIN unlock screen by turning off the Security setting labeled Make passwords visible, as seen here: This is found under the general Settings app under the Security section. Note, however, that this also ...


0

You could use encryption on the entire drive. This can be done with certain apps like EDS (which creates an encrypted container on the device, which requires a password to be opened -- but after that the file system is mounted transparently for all apps to access; these containers are TrueCrypt compatible). Some of these Apps (like e.g. Cryptonite or LUKS ...


1

Check if your credentials in security, if you have an application that requires you to have a password and delete that. Did you encrypt the phone ? That requires a password. Also if you are a guest you cant, but i think you already are an administrator of your own device.


3

Adding to what Andrew T. posted, one can also have Trusted location: Phone will not challenge user with the pattern lock if the user is present at the location added in this setting. Home and Work locations will be present by default, more locations could be added. Trusted devices: One can add bluetooth devices such as Android wear or bluetooth headsets ...


0

I am currently using an app in beta called Zwypelock. This app learns your unique behavior — the way you hold you phone, the pressure you apply to your touch screen, etc. It lets you unlock the phone with just a swipe.


2

Ok, just posting an answer in case someone with the same problem finds this. I took a change and hit "clear credentials." Afterwards I was able to select NONE for screen-lock again. So far haven't noticed and side-effects to clearing credentials.


6

As far as I know, currently there is no setting to turn off the "safety lock" due to the addition of notifications on the lock screen. (Strangely, the lock is still there even if the user chooses not to display any notification) The best bet to bypass this is to use Smart Lock's Trusted face, a new feature in Android 5.0 Lollipop similar to previous face ...


0

As it turns out, my phone had never fully decrypted. I went through the encryption process again then RE-decrypted it and I was able to switch back to swipe method.I am running a stock ROM so you can go back and forth from encrypted to decrypted.


0

Anyone with physical access to the device can potentially do that. If the device was completely encrypted, that would be pretty tough to do (and hence really unlikely) – but all unencrypted stuff can be accessed. After all, you expect them to dis- and re-assemble the device – so put in easy terms, they could also "plug" the storage into "some of their ...


2

When your phone is "rooted", applications can be installed (intentionally or otherwise) that can do almost anything on your phone, including breaching the Android application sandbox. Thus, by rooting your phone, you are removing a critical layer of the multi-layered security system. This can be mitigated, to a degree, by restricting root privileges to ...


-2

Click on the name of the credential, scroll down and then press turn off.


1

I recently wiped my phone to factory after I had rooted the phone and got rid of the bloatware I did not want. (Forgot the passcode) I thought I would have to root my phone again and then get rid of factory installed bloatware....again. I was pleasantly surprised to find both that the root was intact AND the bloatware was still gone. Also, my superuser app ...


0

That is expected behavior. It allows you to turn the phone off if you need to ensure the battery doesn't drain (or whatever other use-case you can think up) and still have a usable alarm clock. It's not new, many Android devices do something similar, and every iPhone since the first-generation models also had that feature. I can also recall an old Nokia 3310 ...


0

I wonder if you say you have decrypted your phone because my phone (CyanogenMod 11) says explicitly that the only way to decrypt is a factory reset. http://imgur.com/iFXxsbC.png So in your case I would look if your phone is really decrypted.



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