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0

Yes, assuming you had some "bad stuff" in the backup to begin with. For example, if you installed a malicious 3rd party app you found in some random site, then backed it up along with its settings to an SD card, then wiped/reset the phone to factory settings, then re-inserted the SD card with your backup and restored the malicious app from your backup, ...


3

You (or someone else) probably accidentally click this banner on the main screen. And "Accept" the offer. (Note: this dialog may also pop-up on reboot) - OR - Avast pushed the installation silently (which I still doubt since it didn't happen on my case). Avast gets the Google accounts saved on the Chrome, and it's possible for them to offer their ...


0

To me it seems like a malicious firewall. It can attempt to interfere with your connection to the Google Play website, inject a script in it and the script fires all events needed to download that specific app on all your devices. I would recommend uninstalling this "popular" antivirus as it seems malicious to me. Note, that even though you do not access ...


1

First, both encryptions you name are the same – only that Lollipop enforces this automatically on some devices. Second: it's not the files being encrypted, but the entire partitions – thus everything saved to it ends up in (using simple terms) an "encrypted container". Everything transparent, so you won't notice. No need to re-encrypt.


0

Here's an article showing some options if you have a PC: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/mobileblog/entry/mirroring_an_android_device_screen_onto_your_desktop In my limited experience, realtime viewing is tricky. If screen snapshots are OK, I'd recommend Teamviewer as I've always found their products robust: ...


1

You can disable background data. That way applications will use data only when they're running in the foreground. For this, go to Settings > Data Usage Menu > Restrict background data


1

Yes, just like for any Linux PC, you can install a Firewall to block wifi/mobile internet accesses and XPosed to keep track of all access attempts made to you device from programs. But unlike what Google and Samsung want to make you believe. Rooting your device is essential to allow you to have far better control of leaked data and unauthorized access. I ...


-1

In addition to these, you can use Android Device Manager too. There are at least 7 good apps described here, you can pick one.


-1

I think it was in Android 4.2 a feature was added that requires the phone to allow each PC it is connected, which is identified by a unique key. You can save this key in your phone rather than having to click on accept every time. If you want to clear the keys that you have already accepted: Settings -> Developer Options -> Revoke USB debugging ...


0

Try this from adb shell on your PC or from a root terminal on your device: content update --uri content://settings/secure --bind name:s:mount_ums_autostart --bind value:i:0 Per the Android source code: /** * Whether or not UMS auto-starts on UMS host detection. (0 = false, 1 = true) * @hide */ public static final String MOUNT_UMS_AUTOSTART = ...


0

You already indicated the possible use of an app. And indeed, next to the so-called "vault apps", there are several options for Encryption of Files and Folders which work transparently on the file system. For some, you still will need to use "specific folders" which you encrypt, though – while most of the others fall into the category of requiring root ...



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