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51

Cell Signal Some backgrounds as explained by ce4 on the question Does 'poor' reception deplete the battery quicker?: The transceiver circuit is engineered with power saving in mind and will reduce sending power as much as possible if the reception is good. This also reduces the SAR value which is a measurement for exposure of the human body to ...


15

Yes, it does cost you more power. The transceiver circuit is engineered with power saving in mind and will reduce sending power as much as possible if the reception is good. This also reduces the SAR value which is a measurement for exposure of the human body to radiation. If the reception is bad sending signal strength has to be adjusted accordingly. ...


12

Cell signal To add to ce4's answer: You can check that for yourself. If you take a look at your battery stats (they are always at a little different place in the system menu: Sometimes in the main menu, other times under phone info), it lists the apps which used most of your battery. One of the highest consumers in there is most likely your display -- and ...


11

They are referring to the mobile data connection: G: GPRS (slowest) E: Edge (enhanced GSM) 3G: UMTS H: HSPA (enhanced 3G) H+: HSPA+ (even more enhanced/faster HSPA) 4G: LTE (thanks to eldarerathis for confirmation) The bars obviously show signal quality, and the arrows show whether data transfer is in progress. As for the colors (your pictures show blue ...


9

No. Bad cellphone coverage decreases battery life because the phone has to transmit with more power to be able to communicate back to the cell tower. It's like when you can barely hear someone hollering at you: you shout louder too to make sure they can hear you. But GPS is a one-way signal: the phone only receives it, it doesn't transmit anything. It ...


7

Why? When the phone signals are weak, the android OS constantly scan the area thoroughly. This requires more battery power. That's the reason your phone gets so hot when you are in areas with poor reception. Could it be solved? That is the reason it is advised to turn flight mode on when you are is low-signal areas to preserve your battery life. Is it a ...


6

GPS generally affects battery life significantly only when used (in standby, its energy consumption is neglible, usually far below 1 mW). But when it tries to aquire a fix (i.e. you want to know your current position), it might reach consumption values comparable to your device's screen (~500 mW). So in your described situation, it might influence battery ...


5

I would assume this is due to the cell radio firmware, not Android. But I'm not sure. In many cases you can flash older Modem firmware using Odin or Clockworkmod, so you could test and see if the Froyo firmware affects this under Gingerbread. There should be a thread in the Galaxy S forum on XDA with the modems, I'll update this if I remember to look for ...


4

Summing up from my comments above: How do signal boosters work? They work by forcing the device to do a re-connect. Though the device is permanently watching its neighborhood (for the case the signal gets too weak), it does not switch for just a trifle. Instead, it tries to weight the benefits against the costs: switching to a different cell has some ...


4

Essentially, a lower signal strength will lead you device to use more power that in turn drains your battery faster and causes the device to heat. The farther away you are from the closest cell tower, more your device needs to put out a higher power level in order to reach the tower. Transmitting at a higher power level requires more energy from the ...


3

You can do so by having your WiFi switched off when its signal gets weak. There are several apps available on the Playstore which can watch the WiFi signal, one of them being Tasker (which is what I use). Here you can define a minimum level and tell Tasker: If WiFi signal falls below this, switch WiFi off. Of course you can make it even more detailed, and ...


3

I have several bluetooth-GPS adapters that I use with all of my devices when I need a superb signal because a specialiced receiver is almost always superior to a smartphone's internal GPS (due to integration constraints). GPS Receiver: My favourite is the Bluemax 4043 bluetooth receiver. It has more than one day uptime, it can also log 32MB of GPS data and ...


3

If nobody else is having the issue, I'd send it back for a replacement. You probably just got unlucky. Though you might also want to compare the WiFi signal strength with your other phone, and try some speed tests to see if it's actually an issue or if the number of bars is just misleading.


2

It's hard to say without knowing what specific model(s) you're thinking of, but by and large the antennas you're thinking of are probably designed for 3G/EVDO, in which case the answer is no. Sprint's WiMAX network operates on a completely different frequency than it's 3G network, so the antenna for one will not work for the other. The EVO itself has two ...


2

I believe it is related to this issue: onSignalStrengthsChanged returns unknown signal strength where android return wrong strength on Galaxy S2.


2

Your phone settings cannot possibly affect the strength of the signal produced by a wireless router. I would assume that this option just prevents Wi-Fi "sleep", seemingly confirmed by this discussion. If that's the case it will consume more power when you're not using your phone.


2

I've solved part of this issue; switching to Airplane mode and back (bring down the status bar, go to the quick settings panel, tap airplane mode twice) DOES restore signal if you're in an area with signal. So there's that at least, but it's still losing signal until a forced update. You might have to wait a second between the first and second tap of the ...


2

There are a some apps available which would answer your question. The probably best ones include... NoSignalAlert, which not only alerts you when you lost the signal, but also provides a log1 of those events, and lets you even browse those "dead zones" on a map and display the collected log information along2 OpenSignalMaps, offering similar features, ...


2

Flashing your Phone probably also changed your Modem/Baseband. Flashing another might give you better Signal. Here you can download Modems for your phone: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1158783


2

Well, it sounds like you don't want to monkey much. (Otherwise I'd recommend rooting and then installing vanilla 2.2, which is going to be the most stable of any release). It sounds like the problem you experienced is just a flat out bug and might not have anything to do with any apps you are running. On the other hand, are you using any task-killing apps, ...


2

I had similar problems and used Llama, then expanded my use of it to cover other events. It is similar to Tasker, and sufficient to my needs, while still a free app. Most automation can be triggered by entering/leaving cell tower range that is recognized as "Home". It has options to turn on Airplane mode automatically when the phone leaves a cell reception ...


2

When connected to LTE, the phone is also separately connected to the GSM network for voice. Voice does not go over LTE so switching your data to WCDMA (HSPA) won't make any difference in the quality of voice calls, unless you are using VOIP calling. There isn't much you can do to boost the signal other than not using a case or if you do, stick to a thin ...


1

I'll neither say yes or a no to this question. :) Debateable - if you're acquiring a GPS fix through Wifi, you will not get it in the woods or mountains :) However, if pulling 3G data across in order to acquire a fix, the question then steps in, how much battery juice is eaten up when trying to get a good "proper" signal (in between switching masts to ...


1

GPS eat up battery, as described in How much does “GPSing” drain the battery?. But I have no clue is poor GPS reception decreases battery significantly. And I also read this somewhere: GPS only takes up battery life when something uses the fine position permission. However, it drains more battery if you allow the GPS to be assisted by your network provider. ...


1

You are right in that it theoretically should be possible to make the switch without dropping the signal, but unfortunately we users and even CM developers can do very little to change that. The only thing the ROM does is tell the radio to switch from one mode to another, it's up to the radio's firmware to decide how to make the change. These firmwares are ...


1

Unfortunately, there's no native method for this (at least to my knowledge). But WiFi Switcher does exactly that. According to its description: The tool checks the registered WIFI networks every 20 seconds. If one of these networks has better signal strength than the currently one, the tool changes the WIFI network to this better one. But it's not that ...


1

It sounds like you may need to reset your APN settings, Your phone will be slightly different than mine, I'm using a Nexus 4. Try locating the following: Settings -> Wireless & Networks -> Mobile Networks -> Access Point Names -> and from there locate the "Reset to default" option. If that doesn't work, you can backup your device, and factory reset ...


1

BestSignal seems like the perfect solution. It offers both default configurations and also advanced configurations.


1

The Transformer Prime has a problem with its GPS all right. You can get a free external GPS adapter that fits into the docking port. http://event.asus.com/ASUSPad/TF201GPS/


1

Unfortunately, I would say you probably have a hardware issue here. I have had two phones do similar things, one did not connect at all, the other would connect only for a moment before basically shutting the GPS down. Both of these ended up being hardware issues resulting in me returning the devices. My best advice would be to try multiple apps to test GPS ...



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