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20

The reason is the history of Android: The first generation of Android devices only had a small amount of internal storage (around 100-400MiB) which was mounted under /data. Next, devices with a, at that time external, SD-card came out. The SD card was mounted under /mnt/sdcard. After that, devices with large internal storage came on the market. This ...


13

Recommended lecture: Why did /sdcard/ turn into /sdcard/0/ with 4.2?. In short: It has to do with the multi-user functionality introduced with Jelly Bean: /storage/emulated/0/: to my knowledge, this refers to the "emulated MMC" ("owner part"). Usually this is the internal one. The "0" stands for the user here, "0" is the first user aka device-owner. If ...


9

One problem I've noticed is the (at least in Android Froyo), the stock Web browser caches to the phone storage. The browser cache can quickly take up 20+ MB and therefore use up free internal storage. I've moved to using an alternate browser (Dolphin) and set it to cache to the SD card. This has removed my "low internal storage" limits; my free internal ...


8

Your OS may be taking up the remaining space. My OS is several hundred MB. There's not really anything you can do about that, although some custom ROMs might be smaller. Move apps to SD, delete data, uninstall apps, etc. Edit: To integrate system app updates into your ROM, use Titanium Backup. For example, my GMail app shows (updated) in Titanium's list: ...


8

If you are rooted, this is quite easy to find out. First you need to find the app's package name, e.g. com.swype.android.inputmethod for Swype, or com.google.android.apps.maps for Google Maps, for example. You can usually search for the app in Android Market, and the link will contain its package name, e.g. ...


8

Yes you have full 16GB for apps+data together in a single file system. You won't have to do any moving to SD card any more. Google merged both partitions. It's just one big file system now with sections for the former parts. It's completely transparent, so no worries for you. Formerly: /data and /sdcard were separate partitions Galaxy Nexus / Nexus 7 and ...


7

Use a file manager to look in the following locations: /data/app /data/app-private /system/app/ /sdcard/.android_secure (shows .asec files, not .apks) On Samsung phones: /sdcard/external_sd/.android_secure You need to be rooted to view the first three.


7

I also had similar problem with HTC Desire. My solution was to use SD card as second partition for application's dex, lib and apk files. Now I have 1GB free space for applications to install. For this you need root. If you don't have rooted follow this simple process in this guide. After that you have to partition your SD card. You can use clockwork mod ...


7

Most probably your internal memory is too low. You can't access it without rooting your device. And it won't be visible in your PC/desktop anyways with a USB connection. (it can't be mounted) From what I understand your HTC Desire device has 512 MB of internal ROM which is used for both your stock firmware and user installed apps. The 512 MB storage ...


7

Signed up to the site specifically to answer this question. I'm also using a Samsung Galaxy S2 with lots of storage but constantly full. I could not install applications or do pretty much anything. I'm using Cyanogenmod, but this applies to all Androids. What I did was using a file explorer with Root Permissions (to see all the files), navigated to the ...


6

I had a similar issue and found that it was mainly due to the contacts taking up 40mb when I enabled the Facebook and Twitter sync. I would use the DiskUsage app http://www.appbrain.com/app/diskusage/com.google.android.diskusage to find out what was taking the most space on the internal memory.


6

I don't think that this is possible. See Matthew's Post But let's have a lock on how Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory() returns the external storage directory. A quick look in android/os/Environment.java shows that all this method does, is returning a static constant File member called EXTERNAL_STORAGE_DIRECTORY. This constant is initialized by ...


6

If the displayed detailed would be complete, you'd be correct: 1.28G + 7.28G + 200K + 282M + 762M = 9.6 GB total space -- while the summary says 13.24G. Explanation is easy: The details list is not complete. It e.g. misses Cache, temporary files, log files, tombstones, and probably some more. Where to find those? In the file system, and for completeness ...


6

There are many "*2SD" methods, and they generally involve root access. My personal favorite is Link2SD. It uses symlinks, which take up (practically) no space. The actual program, data, libraries, etc are stored on a second partition on your SD card. This comes with the downside of actually having to create two partitions on your SD card (meaning it will ...


6

The "Hardware Backed Credential Storage" aka "Android Key Store" is only hardware backed when the hardware on the device has the necessary hardware components in it. When there isn't the necessary hardware available it falls back to software storage. Android also now supports hardware-backed storage for your KeyChain credentials, providing more ...


5

It is most likely overkill unless you are doing a lot of write/reads to your SD card for some particular reason. The only reason I've known to buy a faster SD card is for photography, when you want to be able to reduce the time it takes to write photos from the memory buffer to the SD card so you can take more pictures at a higher FPS.


5

The find command works well in adb shell. The syntax is find /path -name file_name. For searching read only areas you will need root. If the find command is not available on your particular device, you might need to install BusyBox (search the Market.) For example, adb shell find / -name *maps* will find all files that contain word "maps" across the entire ...


5

The answer is data2sd What does it do? It basically tells Android to use the ext2 partition (once available) on the SD card as internal storage, together with HD2's internal memory. This way you can get up to 4GBs. How to install? As specified in the forum, you can grab the recovery zip (check topic if link goes down) and install it in recovery. It's not ...


5

System memory, internal memory is a mis-leading thing, its actually referring to storage space which is a very different thing to the meaning RAM often referred as memory! The reference to storage - system as in /system would be more accurate. When you download an app from the Play Store, it must be installed into the /data. From there you can actually ...


5

The easiest way to get around this is to root your device and use an app that forces apps to the SD Card (e.g. DroidSail Super App2SD). Limitations of This Apps installed on the SD Card wont have widgets - they will be broken. Apps will not be loaded until the SD Card is mounted. Some Alternatives Use the Link2SD app to move apps to the second ...


4

There is apparently an app in the Market that does this. I do not know the name. It probably requires root. However, doing so is a terrible idea. Two operating systems should NEVER access the same disk at the same time, because they do not know about each other's writes. If you do this you will lose data, possibly everything on your card. There is no ...


4

There isn't any way to get to it. It is basically turning on and off a developer facing backup feature. Each app can write what it wants to into a certain amount of space, and Google takes care of sending it back to the app when it is reinstalled. Even if you were to write an app for it, you'd only be able to access the storage linked to that developer key, ...


4

This, really, isn't an android question, it relates more to file systems. The limitation is set by the file system. FAT32 can have 65,536 entries. Each file and subdirectory takes from two to thirteen entries, depending on the length of its name. There is one entry that hold the Short (8.3) name of the file name. If the actual name doesn't fit that ...


4

It should be the applications occupying /data/ space as they are in use, mainly due to runtime files, cache, database, etc. In order to verify this, you can execute the following: adb shell su -c "du /data" | sort -n It should have a result like: ... 3792 /data/data/com.UCMobile 28399 /data/app 35647 /data/data 49374 /data/dalvik-cache 114865 ...


4

Well, to put this another way: For Gingerbread, storage space weighs around 95Mb, give or take, including Google Apps, source code 6.5GB, compilation taking up approx 14GB space. Android's storage space for ICS, weighs around 160Mb, give or take, including Google Apps, source code 9.5GB, compilation - takes up approx 20GB space. As to JB, have not yet ...


4

Your calculation is based on some misconceptions: ram is no storage. It's the memory used to run active apps (see our ram tag-wiki for details) ROM is a misleading term here (and in many other places). What's actually meant in this context ist storage. So these 4 GB is what you're looking for. Now, storage on Android devices is devided into multiple ...


3

I got this some time ago, and even after deleting all of messages (I back them up to my Gmail) I got the same thing. The problem was that when the internal memory fell below 22M or so (I forget exactly), this message appears. The SMS themselves take up very little space, so deleting them had no effect. You may also be suffering from this bug, as I was, ...


3

I checked several sources on this. Googles own help page states: The Google Play Books app automatically stores books in the location with the most free space, whether that's your device or your SD card, as of when the app was first launched. If you've upgraded your app, your books will continue to be stored in the same location they were before the ...


3

Forcing external SD mount away from /mnt/sdcard has no technical merit, it is Google's way of helping hardware vendors to create a differentiation point for phones with more internal memory. There is no reason why applications have to find a way to locate the external card when /mnt/sdcard was clearly the place the sdcard should have been and Google's ...


3

It is very possible for someone to unlock it, especially with the right skills. Here is what I don't like about pattern unlocks: I once sat next to someone at school who wiped his 'friends' phone screen off, and then waited for him to unlock it. He then stole it and looked at the smudge on the screen to get the unlock pattern. In my personal experience, ...



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