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9

The theory is that you should not need to know. When the developer publishes an app there is a manifest.xml file that describes the required capabilities. These can be both hardware and firmware related. e.g. you need a minimum Android version or you need a specific hardware feature like GPS. Google Play then automatically filters which apps you can see ...


8

Well out of my own curiosity, I made this to start: https://github.com/dieseltravis/AndroidBuildInfo Here it is running on my Moto Flipside:


8

Watchdog will monitor your phone's performance and alert you of issues. Here's a quote from the Lifehacker article on Watchdog. Watchdog runs in the background, watching for apps to start using more than a certain percentage of CPU power that you specify (with a default of 80 percent). When it notices an app going out of bounds, it notifies you ...


5

Ok. I have found the answer, at least for that ROM: In the /system/build.prop file in the zip file, the first "section" has build properties, which details all the information that is visible in the "About Phone" part. This is an example of it here: # begin build properties # autogenerated by buildinfo.sh ro.build.id=GINGERBREAD ...


4

Try Android system Info. You will me amazed how much information this application provides.


3

The best and quickest way to use it is to obtain the tool from the Android SDK, called aapt and invoke it from the command line like this: aapt d --values badging some_apk_name.apk An example of the output is shown: package: name='foo.bar' versionCode='1' versionName='1.00' sdkVersion:'7' targetSdkVersion:'16' application: label='FooBar' ...


3

You will not be able to display this on the Home screen without 3rd party apps. You can use this app called CellID Info from Google Play Store, you may find other apps that display this info too. The CellID Info doesn't say if it has a widget (i don't think it does) but some of the other ones might.


3

There is this app called Antennas. It can't do everything you have asked for. But it can show you the tower you are connected to, the signal level, and other towers from you carrier that your phone can see/connect to and their signal level. Map the GSM/CDMA antennas in your neighborhood. This app monitors the GSM/CDMA cellular network connection; ...


3

I also wrote an app in response to this question. It's free in the market. Let me know what you think. If you want more information, please let me know and I'll add what I can. It's called "Android Information Text ".


3

Elixir is one of the most widely downloaded comprehensive system info app for android.


2

Quadrant also give me the same information that Android System Info.


2

Quick System Info is what I use (and was preinstalled in my LeeDroid ROM)


2

SeePU is another app that will monitor your phone's CPU, memory and network usage. From Lifehacker's artcile on SeePU: SeePU puts monitoring meters in your Android phone's notification area. You can monitor the CPU usage, RAM usage, and network activity. You can adjust the frequency the monitor is updated, how the data is displayed—just CPU or ...


2

As the other answers already state, requirements are stored in the .apk's Manifest. There are several tools available to help you analyze this file, as e.g. is described at StackOverflow's question How to view AndroidManifest .xml from APK file?. Examples given in the answers include: android-apktool aapt (as also explained by Dianne Hackborn) Then there ...


2

The simple answer: You cannot. The expanded answer: You cannot, unless the Developer has specified this on their site. You could also email them to ask them. The developer uses the manifest file of their app to specify certain hardware or software version requirements for their app - Google Play then uses this info so that it doesn't install an app on an ...


2

Well without some specialized program, there's always dmesg. Turn on wifi, then run dmesg in a terminal/adb shell/ConnectBot. Towards the end of the file you'll see debug statements about your wireless. dmesg | grep -i lan can be useful if you have busybox installed. I get lines like this: TIWLAN: 1251 PG 1.2 tiwlan0: no IPv6 routers present The first ...


1

The sure fire method that will work for any phone is to crack open the case, write down the name and part number of the chips, and then research them individually. That can be pretty intensive though, not to mention that you might damage your phone in the process. Manufacturers typically do not publish the parts list for their products. The product spec ...


1

Open Signal Map does some very similar stuff, its accuracy depends on how much data its got for your current area, but seems pretty good in built up areas. I used it to help work out why I always had such a terrible signal at my parents house, turned out my phone kept connecting to a cell tower on the island you can just see from the end of their road, ...



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